What type of Lifejacket should be used in Flood Rescue work?

PFD

A U.S.C.G. approved Type V Swiftwater type with a minimum of 22 lbs. buoyancy is what we use for flood rescue work.

The PFD (personal Flotation Devices) types are going to change soon so refer back to the USCG recommendations to stay current.

We use Force6 Swiftwater types for our water rescue work. The issue is the type of flood rescue, is it standing water or moving water with currents and what is the MPH flow and what are the surrounding hazards.

Rescue Source sells these PFD’s. Their construction is good, buoyancy rating is good and we have enjoyed using their products for years and appreciate that they care about their end user.

The Recue Ops model has 2 colors offered on a black field, yellow and red highlights.

Force 6 Lifejacket

TYPE V

The PFD needs to be properly fitted, and sized with all the straps tied back. This ensures that they are not an entrapment or catch point.

It also depends upon how much gear is tagged onto the mole points for rigging.

Honestly all the floods we have worked we have the lifejackets for our Coxswains and Crew members but they have to be destroyed after the deployment due to contaminants in the water and absorption.

Flushing with a bleach solution degrades the construction material and buoyancy factors.

Also, when we work with survivors for transport we run out of lifejackets, when transporting we don’t always get them back. It is very difficult to have a proper size for every person’s body type we would need a trailer just for that!

Most of the survivors are not wearing PFD’s during evacuations and that can be worrisome if there are currents and depending upon the type of vessel being used.

I hope this helps you gain some wisdom regarding evidence-based real world and training experience using a lifejacket in flood rescue work!

__________________
Posted: July 17, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

POWER GRID

JUICED OUT

Both citizens and First Responders have to be prepared when the lights go out. We both need a secondary source of power.

Think about the items you depend upon that require battery or electrical supply to operate from. Now think of those items for a 7-day period being non-operable.

Now we have focus on the luxuries we enjoy without realizing the impact this has on our personal and professional lives. When disaster strikes, we are admonished to be ready to take care of our own needs 100% for 72 hours. I would like to up that to a period of 2 weeks for a catastrophic event. Especially if there is a chain reaction of several events.

Consider this: When the M9.2 Great Tohoku earthquake struck near Japan, it trigged 11 tsunami waves. A volcano erupted and a nuclear disaster was created and 21,000 people died. Business, homes, industries, wiped out.

Government reeling with taking care of the needs of civilians and managing safety during a series of chain reactions. This could have happened anywhere in the world.

Insert yourself into that equation. Now add in the different stages of life, Children, Adolescents, Adults and Elderly. Now top in that medical and dietary concerns. Now add in agriculture livestock and household pets.

Perspective is not challenging, it is enlightening. This is how we create our ‘Safety Behavior’.

ELECTRICAL DEFICIENT

When we focus on our Safety Behavior, our mind begins to reshape how we view and perceive risk. This can only be positive.

Here is an important safety discussion:

1. Electrical power will be shut down intentionally
2. Electrical power will be shut down by grid failures
3. Electrical power will be shut down due to disaster

We have these three potentials of which all are realistic probabilities. We can expect the experience to occur in our area at some time. Yesterday Manhattan lost power. During #Barry blackouts were rolling through the storm path.

If a person is dependent on electrical support due to medical issues, they must solve this problem. They should consider this 'life or death' and not expect to receive assistance. Failure to have this addressed can be deadly and cause extreme hardship and stress.

Second part of that concern is even under care at a facility that is dedicated towards health care, their grid, and their backup generator system can fail.

So, the degrees of difficulty increase.

There are deeper issues at play here. Take care of your health now if you have no known issues.

Exercise daily and maintain your body needs.

You may have to find creative solutions for power supply. Know contact areas that can support and have that mapped out to be able to get yourself to that facility on your own terms and power.

Have a plan for animals. (not so easy).

POWER UP

Part of our safety behavior requires 100% responsibility. If you find yourself at the difficult moment of reality where power is crashing all around and you won't see if for a week's time. you will be compromised with no available resolution.

1. Gas Generator, spare fuel and fuel cans, funnel, fuel bibs, electrical cord (leave outside). Verify the horsepower to use ratio before purchase. Decide how much fuel you will need, and the noise levels
2. Solar Panels (portable and waterproof) You may need a lot of wattage depending upon what you want to run, so research, research and ask questions!
3. Solar Powered Generators-double the solar panel wattage for cloudy days
4. Portable Inverter Generator

If you decide to use a gas generator, then you need fuel, safely handled and stored. You cannot bring that indoors you will die or become severely ill from carbon monoxide poisoning.

If any creative ideas come into your mind that you fit any of this criterion its time you put a plan of action together and practice it.

This type of dialogue is required, it cannot be ignored.

You will feel better when you start taking action. And the bonus is you have goals which make a plan, which will ensure the hardship is drastically lessened!

__________________
Posted: July 16, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

SAFETY BEHAVIOR BEGINS WITH YOU

Safety is Not a Word

SAFETY IS A BEHAVIOR

When our Earth lives its cycle of life, it has measures it must undertake. You do not have to be a First Responder to train and prepare. As a citizen you can adopt the same mindset.

Earth is in a constant evolution pattern, if it's not an earthquake, tsunami or a flood, it will be a volcanic eruption.

Certainly, we recognize that? Or do we focus on the sensationalism and hype? Not taking our own safety into consideration. Trust me, you don't want to wait to find out!

Sensationalism feeds definitive emotional responses in our physiology and thoughts.

I would say make a choice.

1. Educate or support Anxiety.
2. How can you reduce the anxiety?

It's an oxymoron: EDUCATE!

The Power of Choice

You know that old adage ‘knowledge is power’. Well we think knowledge is also lifesaving.

You will feel much better getting to learn about the planet we call our habitat.

Truly this is the only way to be at peace with the variety of natural elements that control the life cycle
You will experience great rewards.

Did you know that K38 hosts an Education for Disaster Preparation group on Facebook? You can join here if you have a desire to learn how to manage duress when natural events occur.

INVEST

Education for Disaster Preparation

If you join the group, we have a lot of varied subjects that hold downloadable materials for your review. Please visit our UNITS section where this information is stored!

You can consider it like an educational vault!
Or you can conduct an online search of your topic of interest, the internet has everything available to you.

All you have to do is take action.

I suggest that you do that now, rather than in a panic when the first rain band or tremor strikes!

You will feel better!

__________________
Posted: July 15, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

EXPOSE THE WRONG

Maximize the Wrong to protect Safety and the Community

You expose the wrong in your program by focusing on it and identifying all that can create damage. It may be time for inspection if your department experienced a recent mishap.

Maximize the wrong in your training or instructor presentations to protect the safety, reputation and outcome of water rescue response. If you fail to do this you will endorse failure, and that his high associated costs.

Expose damage, have courage to discuss it and take criticism, be brave! Do not endorse lies, fight to defend with honesty and integrity results.

None of us should be learning from mistakes, we should be training to prevent them.

The best advice I have for those willing to learn is to ‘LISTEN”. This is where you’re learning power engages or is dismissed for refusal.

If you really love your job and your colleagues there is no way you could tolerate allowing them to be less than best, set to fail, set to be harmed or killed, damage their reputation and department image.

HIGHLIGHT DAMAGE DON'T EXCUSE IT

What the heck is wrong with people when they allow that? Plenty is wrong. Be willing to give attention to conflict. Don’t be willing to allow you or your colleagues to fall down and fail. Prevention is not a word, it’s a lot of hard effort.

Even when people block the road, there is still a way forward. Take a moral inventory of your team.

If you want to increase efficiency to improve, you will discover you are very wrong about something.

This will be painful to recognize and fix it. Research what you don’t like the most, look for the recognition of error in your program or personal behaviors underway.

INVEST

The devaluation is that you must also research what you listen to! You have to put time into it and research, test, question and review.

 Evaluate your instructors
 Does something seem to be wrong?
 Use your imagination in the pros and cons

When you come to terms with the negatives you can spend more time away from dysfunction in your program and more time in efficient actions.

The multiplicity of complications is what we so easily call a ‘chain reaction’. Make sure it’s a creative strategy interpreted by the mission and vision of Rescue Water Craft operations and not a status quo.

Interpret the wrong to increase the right.

Aim high on your program efficiency.

Someday it’s going to mean everything.

__________________
Posted: July 14, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

ACCIDENT BY SEDUCTION

HIGHER VISION

Seduction by accident has a root cause. Did it begin in training? Are the instructors knowledgeable and updated? Is the content delivered accurate? How would you know?

DO NOT allow a poor instructor to lead you to an accident. Do not endorse them and build their measures up, instead use due caution. It’s your life and others. Do not endorse dysfunction and all its variable levels.

DO endorse an instructor that cares about your professional development. Share their posts and insights. Support their training. Be vocal about their protection of reputation.

There is a hierarchy in place that is either positive or negative, you could call this good or evil. You choose which one you support and build.

Courage builds essential trust in the maritime community. Most folks attach themselves to the naivety of a damaging path and will do anything to protect it. Cynicism would serve you better, and then to move one step forward, have courage!

In courage you can reveal the betrayals extended in training. Here you can remedy the pitfalls and dangerous behaviors and stop putting your hand out to a biting dog.

RICH MAN POOR MAN

You can establish professionalism yourself by first taking control of your knowledge base and declining those who would undermine your trust in water safety.

Those who betray our water safety trust, the fundamental standard of safety that is often violated and undermines your reputation as well as the community; you have the responsibility to defend this.

The power of persuasion can be positive or negative.

You determine these results by volition and ultimately are the responsible "receiving' party for the negative or positive truths of response and team safety.

If you endorse something, you need to proceed with caution until all methods are tested and with accurate insights, not brand favoritism or ego.

And that ego……….oh yes.. that is where the trouble begins.

SCULPTURE TRUTH BY INVESTIGATION

All of you who are newer water rescue responders can change a negative culture of complacency if it exists in your association or agency - into a modern pursuit of excellence.

Give your training programs and equipment awareness Hell!

Bring people in your team up by associated methods of identification of the wrong that is in your program so you can unblock progress.

Keep your team engaged, invite their criticisms and suggestions. Listen to their advice and challenge it until you find the answers.

Usually those answers are not held within your associations and culture, do not be afraid to move outside your inner circle.

Park the ego and learn how to explore truth beyond the comfort of established programs. They may be severely outdated.

Safety is a Behavior, not an excuse.

__________________
Posted: July 14, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

Women who go the Distance on Personal Water Craft

Women Who Inspire

Meet Marta Sikora my former K38 student and friend. Marta came to the USA from K38 Poland to learn how to become a Rescue Water Craft Coxswain.

One day a call came for a request for water safety support. The event would stretch over 3 months. I got off the phone, looked over at Marta and thought a few minutes.

I got up and told her to pack her bags, you are going to Florida! She said ‘I am?’.

Key West to NYC

We began preparations as time was of the essence.

The original RWC operator had backed out and the event was in motion. Tom Jones was an extreme endurance athlete and this was his project.

Tom brought over his Rescue Water Craft and we went through it and got it ready for the journey. Marta and I went over her SPOT tracker, GPS and how to use a Marine Band radio.

She was going to be responsible for the team safety, recovery and navigation along the trek.

Marta operated a Honda Aquatrax from Key West Florida to New York City, New York. That was 1,800 miles of responsible navigation out to sea and though inlets. This was an extreme hardship.

Long Distance PWC Adventure Covered 3 Months

I know that women will be inspired by her actions. But this is not a gender specific experience, it’s a human experience.

Please listen to the video as I share her amazing story that covers three months. I am proud of her and honored to call her friend.

__________________
Posted: July 14, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

HOW MUCH DOES A SEARCH COST?

Big Crow Island, New York

How much does a search cost? How do people put themselves in these situations?

Easy to answer that - they never think it will happen to them. Then it does.

Incident date: July 10, 2019

Yes, we make mistakes. We know that. So what are you willing to do about that? Make another mistake and another?

The warning signals are flashed all over the media, but we have folks who ignore the call to action.

Seriously now, you don't want to be embarrassed or stress your loved ones out do you? Of course not!

Then prepare to stay out of the headlines and police reports.

These incidents happen for a number of reasons such as:

1. Poor preventative maintenance and inspection
2. Poor communication with family or friends on land
3. No functioning electronic communication devices
4. Unfamiliarity with the areas recreating
5. Unfamiliar with risk associated with decisions (no thinking of the worse case situation)
6. Not check the fuel level or riding distances
7. Running aground due to low visibility or not checking the tides
8. Not checking the National Weather Service or monitoring the channel underway for alerts

Naussau County police and mutual aid agencies rescued a stranded Jet Ski from the marshes Wednesday night, south of Merrick, in Merrick Bay.

A distress call was received about 8:45 pm and multiple fire departments including Merrick Fire Department responded for the search and rescue. The Jetskier was missing and his boat was unaccounted for and it was getting dark.

Merrick Fire Department Marine 1 had been searching with other agencies for nearly 2 hours. Their personnel heard a faint whistle blowing north of their location.

The three Marine 1 crew members confirmed this was a distress signal. They pointed out the area the sound was traveling from. If not for these alert crew members the outcome for this PWC operator could have been much different.

NCPD Marine 11 was notified and the NCPD helicopter flew to conduct the aerial search in the direction.

1. Nassau County Police, 7th Precinct
2. NCPD - Marine Bureau
3. Nassau Police - Aviation Bureau
4. United States Coast Guard Station Jones Beach
5. Wantagh Fire Department
6. Freeport Fire Department

ONE IS NONE

Shortly thereafter the Nassau Police helicopter located the missing person in the marsh on Big Crow Island, he was recovered and taken to Wantagh Park.

The Personal Water Craft Operator refused medical attention.

This was a significant mutual aid call-out requiring multiple assets to determine the location of the survivor.

Calls at night in remote areas such as this type of terrain are not always easy to access. There may be safety limitations placed on responders to make contact. Night operations are an entirely higher level of risk for responders.

BE THE ONE WHO HAS PREPARED

This Personal Water Craft operator and all others need to take heed to the lessons learned here. This incident should not be repeated but used as a case example for personal safety and preservation of life.

1. Bring a Marine VHF radio and have it connected to your lifejacket
2. Use a tracking device such as SPOT or inReach. Buy the Search and Rescue insurance. These have built in
GPS
3. File a float plan!
4. Make sure you are familiar with the area of operation
5. Do not operate 30 minutes prior to sunset, night riding is illegal and if you get into trouble you just
complicated your survival rate drastically due to exposure and low visibility
6. Do not ride alone! One is None!
7. Attach a high pitch whistle to your lifejacket strap. That is exactly what saved this individual, but the
search time could have been limited by better preparation of the Operator.
8. Carry on board all the Federal, State required or suggested signaling devices:
• Handheld Flare
• Electronic Flare
• Smoke Flare
• Water Whistle
• Signaling mirror
• Fog horn aerosol can
• Stowage protective case

Do not rely on a cell phone. You may drop it overboard, get it wet or the battery will fail, this is not your first choice for communication, but a Marine Band radio set to Channel 16 is!

If we count all the individuals involved from multi agency support through the command we are looking at over 100 trained persons having influenced this recovery to some degree. Not to mention the millions of dollars in assets used. We are thankful to have outstanding support from departments such as these.

But it is a relationship. The recreational boater needs to take responsibility for their choices.

Everyone must be prepared. If you are not prepared, don't launch.

There is no exception and no excuse to entertain.

You are 100% responsible for everything that takes place once you launch your Personal Water Craft.

Research your boating laws, don’t just take a course, make your behavior part of lifesaving.

How much is your life worth?

A whistle? You bet it is!

__________________
Posted: July 11, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

PREVENT ILLNESS

COVER UP

DO NOT EXPOSE SKIN

We work in a water world and its rift with hazards and dangers. Many of these are obvious, from predators to inclement weather and dangerous water conditions. We cannot protect ourselves from everything that is possible or probable, otherwise nobody would ever enter the water, yet we go to help others and assume that risk.

Our skin becomes soft and easy to chafe from friction on the seat or re-boarding, with the physical load of being a Rescue Water Craft Coxswain or crew member we require full protection for personal safety. It's really a 'no brainer'. Cover up so you can reduce the risk of abrasion or lacerations.

We need to know what we are dealing with and understand the things we can do to mitigate the risk measures that are in our control. Take care of your personal protective equipment!

K38 requires that students come to class prepared with their Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). This means full coverage to protect their body from scrapes and cuts. We do not allow board shorts, or students who are barefoot.

We know waterways are contaminated after rainfall when counties issue health alerts. These alerts are directed to microorganisms called pathogens.

Exposure to sewage-polluted water is the most common source of illness in recreational water users, even swallowing a small amount may induce sickness. Sewage makes its way to waterways most commonly through sewage overflows, polluted storm water urban runoff, malfunctions in treatment plants, boating waste, and septic systems malfunctions.

This is why we hear the recommendation to avoid contact with waterways for 72 hours after a rain event, especially near a storm water drain. Seventy-two hours is used as a general rule because natural processes help return bacteria levels to normal during this time period.

Ocean currents play an important role by diluting and dispersing stormwater runoff, which is why elevated bacteria levels can remain persistent at enclosed beaches with little circulation.

However, as RWC first responders we do not always have a choice when the call comes to deploy for a mission. We are boat based, but we can be splashed by water and maintain water contact. But we do have a choice in maintaining our personal protective equipment and ensuring it is ready to go.

ILLNESSES
We have all had one or several of these throughout our career. None of us have come out of the water without some kind of impact. It could be as simple as not cleaning your PPE and allowing an environmental for bacteria to breed.

They are a wide range of non-enteric and enteric illnesses. The most common is gastrointestinal illness (AGI).

These symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, fever and stomachache. Different types of polluted water pathogens such as viruses, protozoa and bacteria can cause serious infectious disease of AGI
Non-enteric illnesses include ear, eyes, nose, and throat infections

Some of the most common bacteria causing soft tissue infection after water exposure include Aeromonas species, Edwardsiella tarda, Erysipelothrix spp., Vibrio vulnificus and Mycobacterium marinum. But that is not all, we have unknown or unseen pollution to contend with.

A Streptococcus (GAS) bacteria
Group A streptococcus (GAS) is a bacterium that is often found in the throat and on the skin of people. GAS is most often associated with “strep throat” and impetigo (blisters on the skin). On rare occasions, GAS can cause severe, life-threatening illness like toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis (flesh eating disease).

Sometimes described as "the flesh-eating bacteria"

Staphylococcus (or "staph") Bacteria
Staph is resident flora of the human skin, meaning that it normally resides on the skin but does not cause disease. Staph is a gram-positive bacterium that can enter the body through cuts, abrasions, or by coming in contact with the mucous membranes of the nose, eyes, and nostrils causing disease and infection.

The infection often begins with a little cut, which gets infected with bacteria. This can look like honey-yellow crusting on the skin.

These staph infections range from a simple boil to antibiotic-resistant infections to flesh-eating infections.

The difference between all these is the strength of the infection, how deep it goes, how fast it spreads, and how treatable it is with antibiotics. The antibiotic-resistant infections are more common in North America, because of our overuse of antibiotics.

LEGIONELLA

The deadly bacteria species, legionella, thrives in the mist of warm freshwaters and enters the lungs when tiny legionella-containing water droplets are inhaled. It is most often found in public spas, hot springs, rivers, and lakes, but outbreaks have occurred at beach shower facilities.

Cellulitis
One type of staph infection that involves skin is called cellulitis and affects the skin's deeper layers. It is treatable with antibiotics.

The signs of cellulitis are those of any inflammation -- redness, warmth, swelling, and pain. Any skin sore or ulcer that has these signs may be developing cellulitis. If the staph infection spreads, the person may develop a fever, sometimes with chills and sweats, as well as swelling in the area.

Infection-producing germs that can lurk in water include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which causes swimmer's ear (an infection of the outer ear canal, known medically as otitis externa) and skin rash (dermatitis). Others include cryptosporidium, Giardia lamblia, shigella, and E. coli, which can cause diarrhea.

Diarrhea may occur when contaminated water is swallowed and driven into the mouth or nose. (do not swallow water)

What is Vibrio vulnificus?

Vibrio vulnificus is a bacterium that normally lives in warm seawater and is part of a group of vibrios’ that are called "halophilic" because they require salt.

How do persons get infected with Vibrio vulnificus?

People can get infected with Vibrio vulnificus when they eat raw shellfish, particularly oysters. Occurring naturally in the warm coastal waters, particularly during the summer months, Vibrio vulnificus has the potential to cause serious illness.

Persons who have wounds, cuts or scratches and wade in estuary areas or seawater where the bacteria might be present can become ill. There is no evidence of person-to-person transmission of Vibrio vulnificus.

What type of illness does Vibrio vulnificus cause?

Symptoms of Vibrio vulnificus in wound infections typically include swelling, pain and redness at the wound site. Other symptoms of Vibrio vulnificus infection include; nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, chills and the formation of blistering skin lesions.

Individuals experiencing these symptoms should contact a physician immediately for diagnosis and treatment.

ERYSIPELAS
Erysipelas is a bacterial infection that occurs in the top two layers of skin. It is also commonly referred to as St. Anthony's Fire because it can be very painful and cause an intense, burning sensation.

Erysipelas is similar to cellulitis but affects different skin layers. Streptococcus is the usual culprit.

With erysipelas, the skin infection is usually very red and swollen, and there will be a sharply defined border between the normal and infected skin tissue.

FOLLICULITIIS
Folliculitis is a relatively common infection of the hair follicles. It may be caused by bacteria and fungus and is characterized by tiny, red bumps that are filled with pus.

BLADDER INFECTION

A bladder infection is a type of urinary tract infection (UTI). This refers to an infection anywhere in the urinary tract, such as the bladder, kidneys, ureters, or urethra.

Most cases of bladder infections are acute, meaning they occur suddenly. Other cases may be chronic, meaning they recur over the long term. Early treatment is key to preventing the spread of the infection.

What causes a bladder infection?
Bacteria that enter through the urethra and move into the bladder cause bladder infections. Normally, the body removes the bacteria by flushing them out during urination.

Bacteria can sometimes attach to the walls of the bladder and multiply quickly. This overwhelms the body’s ability to destroy them, resulting in a bladder infection.

INFECTIONS

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), most bladder infections are caused by Escherichia coli (E. coli). This type of bacteria is naturally present in the large intestines.

An infection can occur when bacteria from the stool get onto the skin and enter the urethra. In women, the urethra is short and the outside opening is not far from the anus, so bacteria can easily move from one body system to another.

Cuts, Scrapes or lacerations

• Wear a full personal protective equipment that is properly sized, cleaned, fitted and no tears or holes
• Clean lacerations immediately
• Use good hygiene
• Wash you hands with warm water and mild soap and rinse with water after changing a wound bandage
• Use waterproof bandages for cuts and scrapes larger than the damage area, replace as needed
• Avoid touching other people’s wounds
• Don’t share razors, toothbrush or other personal items
• Use clean towels, bedding and clothing.
• Shower after each training session, scrub and clean skin, hair and under fingernails/toenails
• Clean your booties, wetsuits gloves and gear after every use
• Contact your doctor immediately if you have a skin, nasal, eye, ear or respiratory infection
• Be aware of alerts or advisories and monitor the weather in your area of operation.
• Do not train or be in the water with any open wound or scrape

Suggested Cleaning Agents
(please consult with your personal doctor, conduct your own research)

1. Water & soap
2. Vinegar
3. Bleach solution diluted 10:1
4. Isopropyl Alcohol
5. Antibiotic ointment and fresh bandages
6. Hydrogen Peroxide (sometimes not recommended for wound care)
7. Iodine
8. Colloidal Silver
9. Oregano Oil

Investigate the products listed above. See if they apply to you and how you would incorporate them or not. Safety is a behavior and its a huge responsibility. We need to look out for ourselves first.

This is a justification to clean out the bilge and wash down the craft. We cannot fully decontaminate a boat due to the foam and rubber components, but we can maintain a clean vessel and a dry bilge and make sure our PPE is ready for us to wear.

Our personal health and safety matters, so don't delay to conduct your research. Now is the time, don't wait until after the fact.

Reference:
https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/swimming/swimmers/rwi.html

https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Fact-Sheets/Meningitis-and-Encephalitis-Fact-Sheet

https://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/1981/0848d/report.pdf

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Posted: June 30, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE – ENGINE EXHAUST COOLING SYSTEM

PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE

WHAT IS PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE?

It is a thorough understanding regarding relationship value of care and inspection.

Three Suggestions of interest:

1. Conduct proper water flush procedures for the exhaust cooling system and purge the lines.

2. Drain/dry all remaining standing water out of the engine compartment and bilge area. We like to use a reverse dry/water vac when the engine has cooled down, or simply sponge by hand and towel dry, ventilate with the seat off, or slightly cracked for airway flow.

3. Inspect and tighten hose clamps. Inspect gaskets and hoses for pressure release.

Corrosion inspection for the exhaust system

DRY BILGE

Do not store like this outside with your seats removed in a marine environment due to salt droplets, debris, wind and dust/dirt.

Make sure your post operations inspections are thorough.

You have metal to water conductivity with standing water.

Gaskets can become damaged along with metal parts.

Do not allow your craft to sit in water for extended ranged days.

INSPECTION LIST

Observe your hourly maintenance chart per the make, model and year of product of Rescue Water Craft you are operating.

I have suggested to you before to make a binder for your Jet Ski to maintain your inspection records and engine hours, so if you haven't gotten after that now is the time!

Metal sitting in water can corrode from salt contact

That binder you maintain accurately can save you $$.

Regarding cleaning/flushing: Some folks like using Salt Away, some use Simple Green and some use Dawn Detergent, regardless, effective preventative maintenance is your Jet's Skis best friend both internally and externally.
I make my own flush/wash.

Kawasaki Ultra LX 2018 Muffler system

Make sure you take care of your muffler system

You cannot go wrong by keeping your bilge dry!

______________________
Posted: June 29, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

HOW TO CHANGE AN OIL FILTER CARTRIDGE

OIL FILTER INSPECTION

KAWASAKI JET SKI® OIL FILTER INSPECTION

In our K38 courses our students are conducting the tune ups on their training Jet Skis. They will change the oil and when needed replace the oil filter cartridge. I'll run you through a quick review of what we have them do.

Sometimes the cartridge wasn't set right the previous time and it can be challenging to remove. Don't stress, you can get that project done with a little advice.

The inspection discovers there is oil leaking from the oil filter. Do not use the Jet Ski®.

Immediately take it out of service. If you see oil in the bottom of the engine compartment, or notice oil splaying around the oil filter or leaking, or the warning indicator light on the LCD flashes the code: OIL), the ECU will place the craft in ‘safe mode’ due to low oil pressure (3 000 rpm).

TOOLS

Cause of oil leak: Oil filter was not installed properly.

It is important take grease and coat the rim edge with the rubber gasket.

Putting the oil filter on the threads must be lined up appropriately.

The oil filter needs to be put on with the correct torque specifications.

Example: Kawasaki STX-15 Jet Ski® 2014 model.

OIL

ENGINE OIL REVIEW (Marine Grade)

It is important to follow the manufacturer’s recommendations. If the craft is under warranty have the dealership maintain the craft during this period.

However, it is important to know how to change the oil and oil filter in case of water immersion or ingestion. You will need specialty tools.

Oil it to be replaced every 50 hours. Engine Oil Filter every 100 hours or as needed

First Step
You will need to complete an oil change.

• Remove the engine cut off switch from the ignition post.
• Level the Jet Ski® on the trailer or shop cart.
• Remove the oil dip stick (When you replace make sure the O section of the finger pull is facing the cylinder)
• Place the oil removal tube (straw) down the dip stick opening.
• Four Stroke SAE 10W-40 Marine grade oil, 5 US quarters or 5.0 L.

When you drain the oil, make sure you replace as much oil as you removed. Do not overfill!

OIL FILTER REMOVAL TOOLS

The manufacturer recommends that you use the following tools for oil filter installation and removal:

1. Funnel
2. Eye protection/gloves
3. Ratchet
4. Oil filter removal tool

TROUBLESHOOTING

When the oil filter is frozen in place and is difficult to remove you will have to take aggressive removal measures.

Due caution must be used to not damage the threads of the lower-case unit.

You will struggle a bit to do this procedure. (Put some muscle into it!)

You will have to use the stubby claw hammer and ram the Philips head screwdriver through the can, and the can will have to be crushed.

You may ruin the screwdriver so don’t use a high-quality tool This is being done on an angle.

Make sure you are working on the angle of the threads to the casing to not cause damage.

Remember to hold the oil filter in an upright position because residual oil may be inside the cartridge.

Place an absorbent pad below the working area of the oil filter cartridge.

TOOLS FOR REMOVING A STUCK OIL FILTER CARTRIDGE

1. Phillips head screwdriver
2. Stubby claw hammer
3. Channel Locks
4. Fuel/oil spill bibs


When replacing the oil filter use the torque specifications: 18 N-m (1.8 kgf-m, 13 ft-lb)

Replace oil as stated above. Test the water craft using the water flush mount and flush instructions.

Warning: Refer to manufacturer’s settings and recommendations. Use at your own risk.
This review is not to be relied up 100%, have a qualified Kawasaki mechanic perform all inspections and maintenance on your Personal Water Craft to ensure a safe operable vessel. Reference materials: KMC

______________________
Posted: June 26, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.