100 FOOT WAVE

FADING LA NINA

StormSurf.com clinical analysis of Storm #8 of the year 2001

Reference date: November 21, 2001

Storm #8 generated the largest swell on record. Beating out the huge Hawaiian El Nino swell of 1/28/98.

Forecast to be a rather local and moderate storm that was to track over buoy 46006 (SE Papa). Like Storm 1 in 1999, what actually hit was beyond imagination.

Days earlier 2 storms were forecast to move in quick succession into the Gulf of Alaska.

As expected, the first one developed and followed the forecast track. Generating a swell that started to hit the outer SE Papa buoy (46006) on 11/19 at 11 AM with seas in the 20-23 ft @ 17 secs.

This swell reached Mavericks the afternoon of November 20th with seas 13-14 ft @ 14-17 secs with swell 10.5 ft @ 15.5 secs, holding through the night. Nothing noteworthy but defiantly rideable at Mavericks. While the first storm took up residence in the Gulf and slowly faded. A second storm followed quickly in its tracks on November 19th.

It developed a small but relatively intense fetch area in its south quadrant with winds at 55-60 knots blowing due east. Carried by the Jetstream and fueled by the moisture left behind by the first storm. These winds found lots of traction at the ocean’s surface, already agitated from the earlier storm.

K38 at Mavericks

MAVERICKS

The new storm also tracked east at a very fast pace. Not allowing the developing seas to escape the influence of its winds, piling more wave energy on top of an already large swell (virtual fetch).

By the morning of 11/20 winds were still being recorded with speeds at 55-60 knots.

The northern component of the resulting swell hit buoy 46006 at 9 AM and held through 7 PM with seas ranging 38.5-41.9 ft @ 17-20 seconds. Very large but not off the scale.

Clearly, this buoy did not get hit with all the wave energy this storm had produced. With much of it passing south undetected. And buoy 46059 located 350 nautical miles off Pt. Reyes was out of service, it was ripped off the ocean floor from large swell activity. Further reducing the effectiveness of the normal early warning system.

Nearshore the situation got interesting. On the morning of 11/21, the swell from the first storm was still present at buoy 46012 (Half Moon Bay) with decoded swell at 12 ft @ 15 secs. As expected, by 10 AM the second swell started to build in with combined seas 16.4 ft and the new swell at 11.1 @ 20 secs and increasing rapidly.

The paddle-in crew was out cautiously catching some bombs as the swell jumped in size with each passing set. The tow teams waited in the channel for their chance to strike. By noon they got their chance as the last paddle surfers were cleaned out and increasing south winds took a toll on conditions.

Combined seas were 19.6 ft @ 20 secs with solid energy out to 25 secs and swell 14.1 ft @ 19 secs.

One hour later swell was up to 14.9 ft @ 19 secs. By now the tow teams were only shoulder hopping the huge sets that were pouring over the reef while south winds set up a strong northerly cross chop.

Even so, Carlos Burle managed to snag the biggest wave of the year, measured at 68 ft on the face.

Shawn working rescue at Mavericks

PEAK

The swell was interacting with the 15 second swell already present, creating huge waves breaking way outside the normal outermost reefs. By 2 PM the new swell was up to 16.3 ft @ 19 seconds, then up to 19.3 ft @ 21 second one hour later.

Shawn Alladio (K38) was out in the channel on a Jet Ski® at Mavericks and reported nearly being taken out by a set of waves. The largest being upwards of 100 ft. Based on the buoys, even larger waves followed after she made it safely to shore.

By 5 PM the largest decoded swell reading hit, with swell at 19.9 ft @ 19.4 secs and combined seas to 23.98 ft.

Whitewater was visible out to the horizon at most coastal locations. And longtime locals reporting breaks they had never seen were going off, but way beyond anything that would be classified as rideable.

Carlos Burle towed into a wave early in the swell of November 21, 2001 at Mavericks. Even larger and meaner waves broke that afternoon, with no one in sight.

Story posted here: http://stormsurf.com/page2/papers/history.html

______________________
Posted: June 23, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

THE VOICE WITHIN

GUIDANCE

Have you ever had an inner voice that rose up from a shadow area within your mind, and it shocked you during a rescue? You listened to the words presented and took the advice. It worked in your favor.

Do you think about it later and wonder if you are crazy? I have.

I’ve had this voice many times lend outstanding advice in a moment of peril. It is a simple determination of words. Albeit nothing complex or drawn out. It’s an actionable prompt usually.

This parallel voice, is it an echo of the mission or a position of the current experience? Is it an alarm to risk and changing dynamics?

There are things unknown taking place that didn’t happen in training, perhaps this is the inner permission to continue out of the scope of boundary.

It’s not the same thing as everyday thoughts that jump up like kernels of corn popping and then lay down, it is a more prominent alert.

The intuitive voice tends to orient me towards positive actions. Not ones that would cause me harm, although I could see a path to that could be fed for obverse reasons.

It seems as if its an integration of the risk assessment and a knowledge base. And this unconscious unified guide arises to help with a positive orientation. It’s a choice to make, I think.

I have listened to this unconscious awareness that is alerting my conscious behaviors.

I don’t know any other way to address this loud guiding voice.

I have given this a lot of thought and retrospective consideration. Do we call this intuition, gut instinct or a protective angel? I think that there is reason for these descriptions as well.

On November 21, 2001 at a large big wave spot called Mavericks at Princeton California, I had a memorable inner voice experience.

This was one of the largest recorded days of waves that were documented at Mav's. I was there working this historic swell on a Yamaha WaveRunner.

I had 4 of my WaveRunners being used at Mavericks, 1 by Jonathan Cahill, 1 by Paul Schulte and the last one being used by the Brazilian big wave champions Carlos Burle and Eraldo Guieros.

As the swell filled in towards the shelf off the Central California zone, the face of the waves began their temperamental approach. Outstanding big wave surfers from around the world were there proving their talent in this hectic watery plain, this is their rapture.

BLACKHAND

Approximately 1:45pm the wave faces were in stride with 70-foot faces.

The harbor department closed down the jaws of the harbor mouth for recreational boating traffic. I had a final conversations with Cary Smith a harbor deputy and I headed out again.

I got underway again, driving out to conduct another recon parallel to the jetty wall. Then across the channel, out to Mavericks and making calculated triangular search pattern for any mishaps that may have occurred.

I had conducted quite a few rescues this day and I was nearing exhaustion.

As I made another pass outside of the jaws, turning to my starboard quarter, I bounced along the jetty wall towards the inside section of the lagoon behind Sail Rock. I had a very loud and strong voice say to me in my thoughts ‘TURN LEFT NOW’.

This voice was loud. It shocked me. In fact is startled me even physically. I attributed it to fatigue and shrugged it off.

A few seconds later the voice returned “TURN LEFT NOW’.

When I looked down Blackhand Reef, it was angry and boiling.

Truly I didn’t want to go there; I had already experienced a mishap in that area before this day and I was not wanting to risk my Rescue Water Craft.

The voice returned for a third time, and it shook me. I turned left towards Blackhand as if following a command.
The water was rocking and white capping. I was alone and uncomfortable with this decision; nervous I was hoping to turn back.

Right before my decision to retreat a black head popped up. ‘Is that a seal?’ I said to myself. It was a surfer.

He did not have a surfboard. He had a black neoprene hood covering his head, his head was low in the water.

I did our trademark Johnny B and assisted him to slump over the rear seat on the re-boarding platform. I slowly drove out of the threat zone keeping an eye on him. We didn’t talk.

INTUITIVE

I passed the safety of the harbor mouth and headed over to the path that takes surfers to the dirt parking lot. The harbor water surface had a crosshatch texture to its surface from the wind, it stung my face, this cold wind chill. I could feel the cold shrug off as my adrenaline settled.

When I pulled up to the inside of the jetty wall and landed, he climbed off the PWC. He crawled his way out of the water, stood up, waved and at me at started his slow walk back to his vehicle.

He was trapped in his thoughts and my internal dialogue was waking up. We didn’t talk.

I was having a vivid conversation in my mind about this experience as I drove away. I looked back at his shadowy form to affirm he was not an apparition and this was a true experience.

I would never have gone down to Blackhand Reef on that day. Waves were barreling at 30’ all along that edge. I was alone, with no backup.

That voice has visited me often throughout my life. Is this what makes heroes? Is this the evidence of integrating experience with the choice of believing that everything will be okay if there is trust?

That voice saved his life. And mine many times.

I have been fascinated with the internal universe of our mind. As a trainer this is what I have done my best to make friends with to gain understanding of others to become a better instructor. To become a better woman.

I would encourage you to explore the decisions you make. Why do you make them? How have they benefited you and others? Did you clearly see results that stopped a mishap or prevented tragedy? Is it noticeable?

I believe that awareness becomes a part of a purpose driven life. Isn’t that where the essence of ‘a calling’ derives from?

Possible, at least I would like to think so.

______________________
Posted: June 23, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Sidenote: On 11.21.2001 the largest set came through Mav's later on this day. I was on the water with my dear friend Paul Schulte and Jonathan Cahill during that time. Carlos Burle and Eraldo Gueiros surfed the largest wave that year on this day. They won the XXL Big Wave category. The photo is from Pablo, whom has saved my life in many ways. I am indebted to his spirit.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

PERSONAL WATER CRAFT TOWING SKIERS

KNOW BEFORE YOU TOW

Personal Water Craft used for the purpose of towing and aquaplane device are to be of the three-seater capacity.

Three-seater Personal Water Craft designed for towing will have rear-view mirrors. Single and Tandem use Personal Water Craft are not permitted or designed to tow an aquaplane device with.

Some of the equipment types defined as a towable aquaplane device (TAD)

1. Foils
2. Inner tubes/floats
3. Wakeboard
4. Water Skiers

Do not drive or reverse back over the tow line. It will foul the driveline and cause damage to the water jet pump and the vessel will have to be placed under tow not faster than 8 miles per hour to prevent engine damage for some models.

All occupants on board must be wearing a USCG approved properly fitted and sized lifejacket.

Towing can only be done with 3 persons for a 3-seater Personal Water Craft and not exceed the manufacturer recommended weight load. For instance, as example a Kawasaki Ultra LX Jet Ski is 496 lbs. or up to three persons on board.

Towing can be accomplished with 4 persons with the older two stroke 4-seater watercraft which are no longer manufactured (date of this publication 6.23.2019).

In some states the Observer or Flagger is to sit reverse on the rear seat to maintain observation of the safety of the towing person and equipment. They are to keep a lookout. They are to have a required safety flag ready to display in case of traffic, an emergency or recovering the towable aquaplane device and person in the water.

Be mindful of the tow rope snapback and wrapping hands and fingers, which can lead to serious injury.

Wear protective equipment and a wetsuit to protect vaginal, orifice or rectal tears and impact from the water jet thrust. Pay attention to all the manufacturer’s warning labels of the towing equipment and the Personal Water Craft.

A few more suggestions for safety underway:

• Take a safe boating course
• File a float plan
• Learn how to right a capsized Personal Water Craft
• Keep intake clearing tools on board
• Bring a waterproof GPS and communication device
• Monitor weather on the NOAA weather channel

Make sure the people you bring on-board your Personal Water Craft are briefed on safety and the boating rules and regulations in your area. Practice in a safe area, observe for boating traffic and practice good communication skills with your team.

Inspect your equipment for damage. Inspect your rope and attachment points. Clean, wash and stow when completed.

PWC SAFETY

Does your state allow Personal Water Craft to pull water skiers?

If answered "Yes" to the previous question, are there any restrictions?

Alabama Yes Must have 2 mirrors, with a minimum viewing area of 10 square inches each, measuring a minimum of 2.5 inches tall and 4.0 inches wide. These mirrors must be mounted, one on each side, on the body (not the steering mechanism) of the PWC in such a way as to maximize the rear viewing of the operator.

Alaska Yes

American Samoa No

Arizona Yes Watercraft cannot be overloaded. All requirements apply.

Arkansas Yes Must have onboard an observer at least 12yrs or older and the PWC must be able to ride 3 or more persons. Mirrors are not allowed in lieu of an observer.

California Yes There is no exemption from having an observer with a ski flag that must be available for use on board the vessel.

Colorado yes An observer must be onboard the PWC and a skier down flag must be used.

Connecticut Yes 3 and 4 person PWC's only - must have a backward facing observer

Delaware Yes yes

District of Columbia Yes Must have a mirror and an observer facing the skier

Florida Yes PWCs must have a person, in addition to the operator, in a position to observe the progress of the skier or have a wide-angle rearview mirror mounted in such a way as to permit the operator to see the progress of the skier.

Georgia Yes Must be a three-seater with one observer.

Guam Yes Same as any water ski operations

Hawaii
Yes same as any vessel towing water skiers

Idaho Yes Cannot exceed capacity, skiers must wear PFDs, and must have an observer and flag.

Illinois Yes PWC must have seat for skier (no overloading) and PWC must have lifejacket onboard for skier if not wearing it...

Indiana
Yes PWC must be at least 9 feet in length and designed for 3 occupants. Must also have observer on board when towing a skier or tuber.

Iowa
Yes Must be a three passenger PWC.

Kansas Yes Must have an observer or mirrors to obtain a maximum view behind and hoist skier down flag

Kentucky Yes A wide-angle mirror or observer

Louisiana Yes must have a mirror or an observer

Maine Yes In addition to the operator, must have a person onboard at least 12 years of age, who is in a position to continually observe the person being towed.

Maryland Yes PWC's must be able to carry operator, observer and skier (at least 3pob capacity)

Massachusetts No

Michigan Yes Must have an observer and everyone wearing a PFD.

Minnesota Yes Must have observer or factory installed or factory authorized rear view mirrors.

Mississippi Yes Must have observer

Missouri Yes Must have an observer aboard.

Montana Yes must have an observer

Nebraska Yes skier counts as part of the capacity of the vessel/PWC

Nevada Yes Vessel must be rated to hold 3 people

New Hampshire Yes Must have an operator and observer on board.

New Jersey Yes follow all ski laws, including ski flag, observer must face aft to tend to skier. PWC must hold at least 3 people

New Mexico Yes Mandatory PFD wear, observer on board, seat for skier.

New York
Yes must be a three person or greater machine

North Carolina
Yes No person shall operate a personal watercraft towing another person on water skis, a surfboard, or similar device unless: (1) The personal watercraft has on board, in addition to the operator, an observer who shall monitor the progress of the person or persons being towed, or the personal watercraft is equipped with a rearview mirror; and (2) The total number of persons operating, observing, and being towed does not exceed the number of passengers identified by the manufacturer as the maximum safe load for the vessel.

North Dakota Yes Must have an observer on board and must not operate between one hour after sunset to one hour before sunrise.

Northern Mariana Islands No none

Ohio Yes Must have an observer at least 10 yrs. old on board.

Oklahoma Yes Must be designed to accommodate two or more persons and must have proper observer 8 YOA or older or two convex rear-view mirrors so placed so the operator can face the direction traveled and observe the progress of the person being towed.

Oregon Yes PWC must be able to carry operator, observer, and skier

Pennsylvania Yes one skier only must have an observer

Puerto Rico No

Rhode Island Yes observer over age of 12 required- must be designed for and capable of carrying the skier and observer and operator

South Carolina Yes PWC must have wide angled rearview mirrors or an observer. PWC must be rated for 3 people if and observer is on board.

South Dakota
Yes

Tennessee Yes Observer and/or mirrors

Texas
Yes Must not exceed passenger capacity

Utah Yes same law as traditional boats

Vermont Yes Must have an observer.

Virginia Yes Capacity of the PWC must be able to legally accommodate the operator, passengers, and those being towed.

Washington Yes None.

West Virginia Yes Must have an observer or mirror

Wisconsin Yes PWC's designed for 3.

Wyoming
Yes No. Same as boats

When referencing the rules above, please check in with your State Boating Law Administration to see if any changes or updates have been made.
______________________
Posted: June 23, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

PWC WAKE JUMPING LAWS BY STATE

WAKE JUMPING

Are you familiar with your State rule regarding Personal Water Craft (PWC) wake jumping?

Each State has different regulations referring to this activity. The ruling came about due to unsafe and negligent operations of Personal Water Craft riders. They would misjudge andjump into the back of the boat they were following.

Risk are heavy and complaints were numerous from boaters who were intimidated by this behavior. Striking a boat, man overboard or the operator causing serious injury to themselves and passengers.

Here is a list of USA States boating law regarding Personal Water Craft / Rescue Water Craft wake jumping.

Be sure to check in with your State boating law administrator to ensure the rulings are updated and you are current in your knowledge base.

Alabama
33-5-51(d) ....jumping the wake of another vessel travelling in the same direction in close proximity to the vessel...crossing at right angles in close proximity to the stern of another vessel or when visibility around the other vessel is obstructed...

Arizona
A PWC cannot head into the wake of a motorboat that is within a zone of proximity closer than sixty feet and cause one-half or more of the length of the personal watercraft to leave the water.

Arkansas
Unsafe PWC operation shall include but not be limited to: becoming airborne or completely leaving the water while crossing the wake of another vessel within 100ft of the vessel creating the wake.

California
No wake jumping within 100 feet of the another vessel creating the wake.

Colorado
Careless boating is defined to include wake jumping at an unsafe distance or whenever visibility is obstructed.

Connecticut
can't jump within 100' behind a boat if it causes you to go airborne.

Delaware
must be 100 yards slow no wake in incorporated area, no jumping shore break

District of Columbia
No operator of any personal watercraft while underway and within one hundred (100) yards of another vessel shall jump any other vessel´s wake while operating or in physical control of watercraft while on the District of Columbia´s waterway. When two (2) or more personal water operators are operating at a speed greater than ten (10) miles per hour, the operators shall steer their craft so as to be at least twenty-five (25) yards apart from any vessel to include any other personal watercraft.

Florida
Jumping the wake of another vessel unreasonably or unnecessarily close to such other vessel or when visibility around such other vessel is obstructed is prohibited.

Georgia
Within 100 feet of another vessel

Hawaii
per federal regs

Idaho
Can be considered negligent operation under some circumstances

Indiana

It is unlawful to jump the wake of another watercraft.

Kansas
Must maintain a reasonable and prudent distance behind the vessel.

Kentucky
A person operating a PWC shall not jump a wake in a way tha endangers human life, human physical safety or property.

Louisiana
Careless Operation

Maine
A person is guilty of imprudent operation of a watercraft if that person engages in prolonged circling, informal racing, wake jumping or other continued and repeated activities that harass another person.

Maryland
Pwc's may not jump or attempt to jump the wake of another vessel within 100' of the vessel. This is considered negligent operation

Massachusetts
The "unreasonable" jumping the wake of another boat is prohibited.

Minnesota

No wake jumping within 150 feet of the stern of the other boat.

Missouri
Jumping the wake of a vessel when visibility is obstructed. Becoming airborne while crossing the wake of another motorboat within 100 feet of that motorboat.

Montana
crossing or jumping the wak of another vessel when within 100 yards of the vessel or within 100 yards of a waterskier being towed by a vessel

Nebraska
PWC cannot jump the wake of a boat pulling skiers or tubers. PWC cannont jump wake of a boat within 50 yards of the boat.

Nevada
Vessels must stay 5 lengths away from longest vessel.

New Hampshire
Vessel cannot be totally airborne when jumping wakes.

New Jersey
cannot jump wake w/i 100' of vessel creating wake

New Mexico
within 150 feet of any other cruising vessels.

New York
g. Every personal watercraft and specialty prop-craft shall at all times be operated in a reasonable and prudent manner. Maneuvers which unreasonably or unnecessarily endanger life, limb, or property, including, but not limited to, (i) weaving through congested vessel traffic, or (ii) jumping the wake of another vessel unreasonably or unnecessarily close to such other vessel or when visibility around such other vessel is obstructed, or (iii) swerving at the last possible moment to avoid collision shall constitute reckless operation of a vessel.

North Carolina
A personal watercraft must at all times be operated in a reasonable and prudent manner. Maneuvers that endanger life, limb, or property shall constitute reckless operation of a vessel as provided in G.S. 75A

North Dakota
Jumping the wake of another watercraft within one hundred feet of the other watercraft.

Ohio
Becomming air borne while crossing the wake of another vessel within 100 ft or unsafe distance.

Oklahoma
No person shall operate any vessel in a reckless or negligent manner so as to endanger life or property of any person. No person shall operate any vessel at speeds over ten MPH while within 50 feet in proximity to another vessel.

Please check in each year with your State in case new laws are regulations have been udpated.

http://uscgboating.org/regulations/state-boating-laws.php

______________________
Posted: June 23, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

DAY OF THE LEG DRAG

RED FLAG WARNING

I was racing at Long Beach at the Marine Stadium with the world’s greatest Jet Skiers. Many of my friends know this place well as first generation Jet Skiers; that was our hallowed ground for RPM loads! We all have race stories. This is one that helped me climb the ladder we call life.

To be on a track during that time was high energy! The competitive spirit and drive was a birthplace of everything that came after in Personal Water Craft racing.

New engines, pipes, pumps, anything you can think of was being engineered, designed and tested, curiosity was a fever. Development was a weekly high. This was part of the Jet Ski Fever.

I was a weekend stand up Jet Ski® racer; meaning I was a mother first, had my own business and was working hard to get the time and funds to compete on the weekends. And how we raced!

We had qualifiers, heats, last chance qualifiers and main events. Easily up to 50 women would vie for the limited top positions for the mains. Every main event was earned.

Racers with amazing talent across the nation would drive hundreds to thousands of miles to compare themselves to others. They represented 50% of the equation, the powerhouse gamble was their custom build and race teams.

Women were on these tracks. Lots of women!

These women opened the door for motorsports. They are Jet Ski icons and mavens. They gave a gift to this generation that should be determined in honor and gratitude.

Some day this current generation of female racers needs to do the same for those coming up behind them and we encourage them increase and not decrease the worth of our efforts. We gave a lot to this sport for 'future generations'.

We determine this to represent a code of honor for racing to rest upon. And for those who built it before me, I thank you.

Prominent Race Names come to mind:
Brenda Burns, Celeste Peterson, Bonnie Burns (Brenda's mother), Kelly Koster, Bonnie Gordon, and Cindy Coffman.

There was a race every weekend in California. BC Racing was our Region 1 promoter and I would enter 4-5 events. Whatever they had to offer I signed up: freestyle, closed course, obstacle, slalom and the gran prix (long distance).

My Jet Ski® was salvation. It kept me sane with the hectic pace of life I adopted as an adult juggling a lot of responsibilities. This was therapy for me. My Jet Ski® taught me about myself, racing was the delivery of tempered emoti