DO NOT TAKE SAFETY AT SEA FOR GRANTED

YOU ARE YOUR RESPONSIBILITY

“A Moment for Safety Will Save a Lifetime of Regret” – Wake of Fame Inductee Brian Bendix

The only reason you are reading this is because you care.

1. If you are a passenger on a Personal Water Craft (PWC) you assume your own risk of safety. Prepare, study and take responsibility for your actions underway and prior to departure.

2. If you are an operator or owner of a Personal Water Craft (PWC) you assume your own risk and safety and those you bring on board. Prepare, study and take responsibility for your actions underway and prior to departure.

Boating is a lot of fun! The pursuit of this experience bears the responsibility of being safe so you can enjoy the outing and come home safe.

There is an amazing amount of content on the internet warning people, free information, free boating courses, free downloads for Owner’s Manuals, forums and groups you can join.

Paid or free you have every opportunity to empower your experience and that of others! Make sure you invest in your personal safety and that of all you have on board your PWC.

You cannot blame the boat, the weather, the water, or your friends. Your safety begins with you!

FREE EBOOK!

If you like what you have read so far, download the FREE eBook!
Accept the terms and conditions and evaluate the content and begin your educational outreach and personal responsibility campaign!

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Book ID: #2-121-20
About this K38 eBook
15 Pages
Published January 21, 2020
Completed: January 20, 2020

Author: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost PWC authority and leading Subject Matter Expert and Founder of K38. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft coxswains. K38 is dedicated towards protecting reputation, distributing boating & water safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care and seamanship skills.
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RWC Readiness Dimension

The structure of maritime authority and governing boating and water safety rules is based on ‘safety at sea’ measures and a hierarchy of order within a risky and dangerous activity.

This is derived from an organized system of practices based off the evidence from around the world of what people did wrong, how programs failed and what those results were and the faith to make it better.

The role of instructors it to make this world wide learning experience not only safer, but to enforce the safety practices and invest in the student cadre these resolutions.

Its based on a set of skills, the integration of the manner of these practices, the mindset determination of the individual and the boating safety culture.

Training programs are broken into functional categories, and those categories are identifiable domains that reflect the carriage of the student embodiment.

The capacity to fulfill the best practices or standards that you study under also incorporate the study of who you are as an individual. The mindset of a person is the greatest domain. Its based off their complexity of experience and behavioral training and functions in the real world.

These routines are dependent on the pattern of the complexity that involves boating safety.

The maritime possibilities of risk have to be directed at individual solutions with the perceived path while underway. That is a constantly changing dynamic.

If you think you are on the edge of a moving precipice and the boundary is just off your bow, your role is to stay steady and reduce any potential mishaps.

Each time you cross over that next wave (boundary) your performance of that pattern is the realization of your performance value. Was it safe? How do you determine what safe is?

THIS IS YOUR FUTURE

Encourage yourself to look at your operations from an objective perspective. The things you have not experienced yet are not your known module, you have to transfer into the unknown potential to understand the stakes you are engaged with.

The direct encounters you have with each wave, swell, directional change, current vectors of wind force and survivors are complex causalities you must solve on those boundaries.

You find the meaning of safety at sea by the cultural context of the law, the standards, the examples and prior mishaps, possibly even your own.

When you interact with your Rescue Water Craft, TAD and Crew you begin to gain sense of those realities that are not contained within your text book manual. You have to collapse the potential of the unknown into reasonable and transferable actions.

Do not give excuses to the actions you examine. Specify what you experienced if you want to attain operational security from your past to move forward your capable response. The unknown is the manner you use with your specified education history. Use this review process to transform yourself, rather than hold yourself hostage from pathological defense.

The analysis of the objective problem is the key. Your Rescue Water Craft is your model of success, it delivers you to the point of contact desired. This vessel represents your success. However, if it suffers a failure operationally, it becomes a possible threat.

How good are your inspection methods? Do you know how to fix it, to troubleshoot and to afford the budget for repairs?

The Rescue Water Craft is only good when its functional, otherwise it’s a significant liability and a danger to the risk metrics engaged. Geographic and weather compliments will add to this challenge along with the survivor

We are territorial beings, in our regions we become protective. In our failures we become defensive. This does not serve the greater good of our maritime culture.

That territory is challenged by what you do not know, it creates a delusion of where people think they are versus what nature will prove to them in reality.

BOUNDARY OF POTENTIAL

You are only as good as you know what to do. If you do not know how to match your behaviors and place them into motion, you will not aim for the success metric of Rescue Water Craft operational security.

You need to know how to act in your territory of domain aka Rescue Water Craft operations. When operators drive outside of their known RWC territory, they begin to lose control of their situation because they have not mastered that next domain. The possibility of the unknown can have disastrous results.

They can also allow an Operator to awaken to the moment and transcend the unexpected if they maintain a safety mindset.

Being prepared means to not rest in the past, but seek the future solutions.

You can make a dangerous situation worse. Tragedy is what we strive to avoid creating.

You are reaching from familiar territory to the unexplored territory. People do not like change. They know how to behave where they recognize the actions are predictable.

The risk areas in training are to prepare Coxswains for those areas that are unknown and unpredictable.

We are engaged with the chaotic and unpleasant measures of how we can die in an aquatic environment. When we use our training structure, we have to manage our mindset with reasonable balance.

Every time you train you are familiarizing yourself with the new behaviors, and this takes time. You have to associate new actions.

You are working with the danger imposed to make sense from it though your own behaviors. There are multiple pathways of learning, narrow your analysis to attend to necessary results.

Be careful about the abstract ideas of unchallenged methods, do not be distracted from the realities of risk in the maritime environment.

In training you compare results. Pay close attention.

That is the structure a good instructor will deliver and nature will defend. It is your role to make sense of it.

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Posted: January 21, 2020

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards:
Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost PWC authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft coxswains. K38 is dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

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Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

History of the WNY PWC Challenge Coins

THE HISTORY

Craig R. Witt is the founding member of the WNY PWC club based in the Buffalo, New York area.

Back in 2017, the first recreational WNY PWC (Personal Watercraft) event began gaining traction within the PWC community.

This was due to the work that was generated from previous years local events.

These community events gained industry support through the motto ‘We Support Those Who Support Us’.

#WeSupportThoseWhoSupportUs

One of the outstanding supporters was Ken KGees. He had reached out from a military based PWC club, looking to support these efforts. He secured a monetary donation that was gifted to WNY PWC.

TEAMWORK

WNY PWC was inspired by this generosity and decided to “pay it back” through activities that honored a military tradition of mutable respect.

Enter Craig R. Witt. ‘As former veteran myself, I had a challenge coin in my night stand and began searching how to have these made for our PWC events’.

Ken Gees agreed with the concept and together they began working on the original design.

Each year WNY PWC carries on this tradition by having an amazing sponsor cover the cost of this highly collectible challenge coin, These WNY PWC challenge coins show the event ride logo on one side and the donating sponsors logo on the opposite side!

These challenge coins are a club and rider tradition that is carried on each year

STAY TUNED

We can’t wait to see how many coins their members will collect moving forward this outstanding tradition. They have structured some fun opportunities for their members who present their challenge coins at future events.

Stay tuned for those stories…….

For more information please visit: Follow the Club on their Facebook page

Special thanks to Craig for sharing the club information and KGees for his dedication.

To sign up for the free K38 e-book History of Challenge Coins and Memorabilia - Book One, you will find this story in the book: Sign up for FREE e-book!
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Posted: January 20, 2020

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

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Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

WHAT YOU DO NOT KNOW IS THE PLACE TO START

WHAT IS THE DUNNING - KRUEGER EFFECT?

“People tend to hold overly favorable views of their abilities in many social and intellectual domains. The authors suggest that this overestimation occurs, in part, because people who are unskilled in these domains suffer a dual burden:

Not only do these people reach erroneous conclusions and make unfortunate choices, but their incompetence robs them of the metacognitive ability to realize it.

Across 4 studies, the authors found that participants scoring in the bottom quartile on tests of humor, grammar, and logic grossly overestimated their test performance and ability. Although their test scores put them in the 12th percentile, they estimated themselves to be in the 62nd.

Several analyses linked this miscalibration to deficits in metacognitive skill, or the capacity to distinguish accuracy from error. Paradoxically, improving the skills of participants, and thus increasing their metacognitive competence, helped them recognize the limitations of their abilities.”
– Dunning/Krueger

Source: Semantics Scholar

FALLING AND FAILING IN THE RESCUE WATER CRAFT CULTURE

You can see them in videos and all over the internet, making claims that you know are reckless, dangerous and negligent, but they are oblivious to. You see it in organizations, associations, departments, teams and instructors.

How can obvious warning signs that are unsafe practices be so easily ignored or unrecognized? This behavior lies in the individual’s self-assessment of over inflated value. This can lead to poor estimation of actual capabilities and lure an Operator into a false sense of security.

This is where we view frequent accidents on videos of Operators using a PWC beyond their actual capabilities. The relevant skills are missing. These detrimental behaviors are costly and only serve a self serving bias and do not reflect our professional operations.

We never arrive at the pinnacle of our objective. We are constantly striving for the horizon of knowledge. This is a mighty journey, do not over place yourself.

When asked do I consider myself an advanced RWC Coxswain, I respond ‘yes, but I have so much more to learn’.

Our enthusiasm for using a Rescue Water Craft and diminishing the boating safety requirements for competency has become a maritime cultural whitewash. It has brought all of us to this monolith at some point in our career.

Usually the wake-up call is a fatality in training or destruction in the field during a call-out. This is where lessons will be learned rather than taught to prevent.

People who are not able to recognize their RWC operational incompetency if tested could not fulfill the reciprocal RWC skills necessary to become competent.

Their logic of performance is based upon the very flaws lacking in their scope even though they boast confidence based on ‘feelings’ rather than ‘facts’, they are a time bomb ticking.

SIGN HERE PLEASE

Why does this matter? Because safety is not a word it is a behavior in place for providing consistent boating operations. We have many predecessors in our ancestral maritime culture who have given us the path towards success. It should not be ignored by the new generation of RWC operators.

The fix for this would be to challenge an Operator as a Coxswain, because the standards are askew between the two.

Stiff regulations of evolutionary boating knowledge are determined by a Coxswain. An Operator is basically anyone at the helm of a Personal Watercraft.

How to avoid the pitfalls of your own meta cognition regarding Rescue Water Craft competency? You have to be critical of yourself; actions, motives, skills and knowledge base.

This is why the scrutineers of instructors must be thoroughly tested based on the science of evidence, fact and performance.

In our boating safety culture, Instructors are the first round of success or failure. If they are not competent in their own scrutiny of the knowledge base, they will turn out the next generation of lower than average Coxswains and Crew members.

However, If an Instructor has been examined after intensive Coxswain training and has the ability to consistently apply themselves to learning and knowledge annually with their recertification, they will be avoiding what is called the Dunning-Kruger effect.

Instructors are not immune to self-inflation. This is why we should all question the content and challenge it for professional development. That type of scrutiny is valid for our safety and those we serve.

KNOWLEDGE IS A PROCESS FOR THE IGNORANT

When a person first engages in learning the RWC knowledge foundation, they previously did not harness now becomes inspiration.

Their prior ignorance of the subject of Rescue Water Craft operations and subsequent instruction afterward, they may feel the invigoration of knowledge.

This is a wonderful experience of inspired purpose, but you are just beginning, it’s the baseline of promise. It is not the destination.

This ignorance can be dangerous if they believe they are an immediate expert.

That takes years of cognitive reasoning with practical applications in the scope of the domain regarding these small power craft. It cannot happen with one class, or one year or even five years.

To master the knowledge base is an intensive process and progress laden struggle, and you should not do this alone. Ask for help. Ask for evaluations, research and study. (Keep repeating that)

Group misconceptions are also on the rise mainly due to the rapid post firing of internet posts that are not scrutinized by governing bodies of education or expertise.

Taking an RWC course does not make you an expert after a few hours or days. Keep training, get on the boat on the water and develop the skills your instructor warned you about.

TO BE OR NOT TO BE

Behavioral training is a significant influencer on our skills, and this can go in an upward or downward trend. Poor imitation is not success.

Knowing something does not make you an expert. Understanding the realities, history and physics behind it with real world data and scrutiny does.

You can be the nicest person on a Personal Watercraft, and well-liked by your friends and colleagues.

But-If you cannot conduct a positive pivot point secure stop on a Rescue Water Craft 50 times, you don’t know what you are doing. And both port and starboard side swings please! After that we will move onto 25 other skill assessments to determine your competency.

This absence of operational knowledge can ruin reputations, damage equipment and injure or kill people.

Isn’t that enough to scare you into a self-evaluation process of your skills? Probably not.

If you are humble and willing to professionally develop your skills, begin here: Focus on your analytic skills. Look at past historic accidents and videos with repetitive operators creating mishaps. Have you missed something? Do you see yourself in the video?

The ethernet universe is cursed with misinformation regarding Rescue Water Craft operations. It is impossible to correct the dangerous operators and educate their adoring fans.

First red flag: Do not seek negative attention from an accident (mishap).

CONSIDER THE OBVERSE

If a Subject Matter Expert who is internationally recognized points out the flaws of safety or operation, listen to them.

Challenge the advice. Be open to the support you are receiving.

You may even help them. Ask me how I know? I had to admit my own shortcomings in knowledge when I stacked up against seasoned boat Captains and Coxswains in the early 1990’s. I quickly realized how little I know about power boating from a technical maritime advantage. I soon wised up and altered course.

‘Criticism in the scope of learning and is the gateway to progress’. (A good affirmation I use)

This is how we construct our positives from our negatives; where failure can endure the process of capacity unfulfilled or neglected.

Be your own Devil’s Advocate. Be hard on yourself, because you care about your reputation.

Write down the opposing views of the positive ones you embrace. What could go wrong? Why would that take place? What sets the pattern in motion for an accident? Do you know what a mishap is and what to consider?

If you changed one thing in your RWC pattern of operations, how much more effective do you think you would be? Are you open to change? Do you have courage to make improvements?

You won’t know until you go.

Reference the Authors: Unskilled and unaware of it: how difficulties in recognizing one's own incompetence lead to inflated self-assessments.

By Justin Kruger and David Dunning (Authors)

Source: Download the Study Here

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Posted: January 19, 2020

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

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Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

THE LANGUAGE OF YOU

Your body language is your connection to those who can see and are willing to listen

You want to get the attention of others? Watch your body language!

When we work in the water you can forget the pitch of sound for articulate conversation. You can demand your body language to compensate and overhaul communication and direction.

When the search is on, our survivors may have their ears covered in water or they may only hear muffled sounds. Their level of conscious being may be diminished.

Are you ready for some constructive advice?

Are you asking that compromised person to ‘put their hand in the air’? Don’t be a poor imitator or at least do not give permission to mislead your potential. You deserve to know the difference.

Start thinking about what you are doing and the results, don’t just assume its proper or the best method. You may discover a disappointment in your past assessments. And that is a good place to start!

What you can expect if you were trained behaviorally in that worn out catch phrase is to assist your survivor in starting their own drowning process if they are using their arms to stay afloat. Don’t listen to people who tell you that because it’s a corrupt behavior.

You must do all the work for our survivors, 100% of the action, it is not a shared 50/50 split! Behavior shift of expected effort with a better resolution to maintain your tempo of lifesaving time.

Time stated as the race against drowning.

EXPAND POTENTIAL - DO NOT CRUSH IT

Don’t allow corruption to be an invitation to a person who is trying to survive, lend them hope by your actions, how you behave and what you do next for them in the water is what they need to rely upon.

Give yourself permission to provide humanity with your best measure, not your restrictions. You have the influence of authority and action, use it with compassion, kindness, strength and knowledge.

Study every day, don’t stop gathering knowledge and perspective.

Part of your navigational role is to try your best to get their attention, but not by reckless operations.

When was the last time you went into the water you work wearing a pair of swim trunks or clothing and floated for 45 minutes, alone? Like a survivor.

That is part of the language you will be speaking and we say it like this:

Think like the survivor but act like the boat coxswain.

You captain the delivery of an asset you can both depend upon because you care.

Remember this you tell your story by your actions, ways and deeds. Practice being mindful of your body movements.

Does the Rescue Water Craft appear stable when you move?
Do you place the craft precisely where it needs to be?
Do you make contact with the survivor before your boat or TAD does?

PAY ATTENTION

Remember, what people can see they will respond. Those movements may be simple, tapping your hand against the hull, reaching out to them, touching them, how your face looks.

Think about your facial expressions. What does your face look like to others? You are wearing a helmet, maybe a balaclava, perhaps eye protection, what else? Can they see your eyes, are you yelling?

Film them and study your response and others, practice using your facial expressions as a way to make contact, an impression.

The tone of your voice, simple and direct words. Where do survivors eyes track? What are they focused on? Can they hear you or are they in shock, which words would be symbolic to their soul at that moment?

Our behaviors are a constant work in progress.

That means the love you have for your job, for survivors and yourself are the divine of our purpose.

Do not be afraid, be amazing!

Download this article here:


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Posted: December 6, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

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Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

WHEN YOU DECIDE

When You Want Excellence in Your Operations, You Express Gratitude.

Want some real-life water rescue advice? This is a compassionate question.

To instill excellence in your rescue boat operations you have to give more than the instructor guidance, more than the workbooks and be ready for the water and weather.

This means you need to decide who you are going to be and what you are willing to give.

You need a hunger or a model of inspiration to drive your will towards goals that exemplify ‘excellence’.

That does not mean you take a course and resign yourself to the certificate issued. Many courses hand them out freely without scrutiny that cares about your functionality. Start caring about your performance.

Were you challenged and corrected, measured and critiqued with sincere discernment? Seek out the critics!

You are just beginning to learn- post training, you now have a place to start. You certainly have not arrived!

It’s time to continue taking steps towards navigating your reputation, spirit, beliefs, strengths and fears.

Don’t succumb to the methods of educational or instructive mediocrity or your last class, even mine. Move ahead on a continuum of developing a structured reasoning of water rescue knowledge. Don’t be brand favorited.

Explore fearlessly the things you embrace or ignore. Tell yourself with sincere conviction: I CAN DO THAT

You may allow yourself to be confined and restricted from creative opportunities that hold your potential hostage.

You have to give more. Put in more time. Sacrifice and possibly use additional resources of financial commitment or travel.

GET CONNECTED

Find a trusted mentor. Do they care about your reputation? How does that measure in action and output?

The only life that provides a spiritual and physical balance is one lived with purpose.

Remember this do not seek praise as your justification of excellence. No, refrain from the praise and seek the encouragement of improvement where you are not excelling! Those critical assessments even if they seem harsh to you, if you don’t get it, you are not trainable. You are emotional.

If you are feelings are hurt from an instructor comment, you need to keep practicing till you get it right! Listen to them and don’t waste their time or yours. You must be trainable or you are looking for the wrong results.

If you have selected the field of rescue as a work discipline, whether volunteer or paid staff, you have eclipsed a spiritual calling, it is simply not a job.

It requires of us that strive for excellence a deeper understanding of the fear associated with dire circumstances, the unknown human condition, our courage and bravery and our foremost skills and tools.

We must keep a measure of continued seeking knowledge to maintain that sacred trust.

We are seekers, searchers and problem solvers, we think for two, three or ten. It is not just about us.

WHO IS YOUR MENTOR?

When I teach in my audience, I see the prospective student in front of me. Spiritually I recognize my burden. It is their parents, teammates, agency, children, wife, husband or beloved, their brothers or sisters or those who depend upon them.

It is the manufacturers of the equipment we train with and use, it is their employees, all who laid a hand on the production and we trust their efforts and tools.

There are thousands of people in my classroom. And my ancestors are watching me. Am I a good steward of their trust, faith and determination? Do I wield their failures and warnings and guidance with respect, duty and honor?

How do I determine that? By humility and service, being a servant of the past to move the future.

These students are either there by their own volition or assigned to take my training. They come in blind faith, or with judgement and negative attitudes. How do we move beyond our own prejudices and expectations and arrive at trust?

We earn it by evidence and historical tempering.

We are the most difficult and opportunistic beings alive; we choose every minute how and what we will do.

In training, we cannot be selfish to a fault, we have to encompass all personalities, maturity levels and egos.

That takes trust, genuine influence of your explored and unique soul-and an open mind who is willing to listen.

But the training content must deliver.

I will keep learning. I invite you to join me and thousands of others in the pursuit of excellence as a way of being.

The world needs your competence and abilities. Let’s get busy!

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Posted: December 6, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

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Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

REGIMENTED RISK

Life is Risk Be Ready

Public Safety Agencies that restrict outside professional influencers from the field by those who are doing the work, getting into or on the water and taking the risks to learn the risks at risk level, are holding their program safety hostage.

Many training programs restrict their personnel from being in the proper conditions of water flow for proficiency or from learning from industry influencers. Pride, ego, fear and program doldrums protect this hubris. Does this sound like your department?

When the water is running high, when its flowing, when its cold, when its night or when the surf is up! The times most call-outs occur are during these types of weather and water episodes.

Why would a department not want their personnel fully ready to go? I have witnessed personnel bring up their concerns with their administration and they are strongly admonished for asking. They get put back in their place and surrender to the status quo. Their leadership teaches them ‘don’t ask-don’t tell’.

Programs need to look at the difference between technical work and the need to go where time is of the essence. Simple rescue techniques that allow a team member to execute a fast moving and dynamic situation that is not in their textbook, nature will require it!

Reality avoidance is a huge liability.

GET ON YOUR BOAT

Technical work requires time, survivor(s) are not always able to afford that. There are times you go quicker than the training tempo, but personnel are ready to do so. Because they trained from a modern reality. They are not stuck in the past and they don’t stare at it.

This is really telling in the world of swift moving and surf rescue, where the conditions are not static but in constant stages of evolution.

Who takes those risks? Who takes the bigger risks? Identify those people. Empower them with the ability to compliment the risk. Because safety is not a word or a training manual, it’s a behavior in our world of risk.

Is your team physically fit? Does their PPE work, are they flexible wearing it, are they comfortable moving in the water wearing their PPE and moving through the water, back and forth, in and out, up and down, pulling, drawing and heaving? Ask yourself: Who is a liability and how is that being managed?

Public Safety Agencies should not be competitive against private service providers.

People who do this within the hierarchy of an agency structure must be exposed and removed from public service. They do not care about their teammates and their fear should not become a public liability.

Do not restrict these education gurus from the opportunity to enable agency team members to learn and glean new information and warnings that their team could not afford to learn - unless there was a mishap or a death involved from their own team actions. Why allow this to happen? The answers are laid our clearly here.

The calling for lifesaving lies within the spiritual fabric of an individual, or it’s a void and just a job.

Lifesaving is considered a sacred action throughout history. We gift medals to hero’s and laud their risks. Make sure you are not gifting a medal to somebody merely because they survived not killing themselves during a callout. We don’t need dead heroes!

Stop that negative potential and reprogram your training methodology, mindset and execution now, do not delay.

LAZINESS IS AN ENDING

Consultants and evaluators are the key to program security and safe practices. Unless your program has individuals, who are operating at 4,000 hours annually and specifically gleaning intel, connected with others who are doing so, comparing notes and results based off evidence, your program is at risk!

We will continue to see mishaps, deaths and equipment failures where agencies will say ‘we will learn lessons from this’. When in fact they should have taken the risk to prevent the liability when they knew it existed in the first place. It’s hard to accept the truth. It is even harder to hear it.

It seems impossible to change, but there are those brave few who will risk ridicule to ensure that their conscious is clear.

Does your program need an outside scrutineer to evaluate your program pitfalls? Is your program lazy, lax or lagging? I’m not talking about hiring surfers or kayakers, but professionals who are industry icons, proven and tested by the evidence they support and know the business of risk to protect reputation.

I will leave you with this observation from years of working with public safety agencies.

Do not be afraid of the water you work in. Make sure your personnel are ready for it. Vet your program attendees on physical fitness, and mental toughness so they can be comfortable working in the environment, under pressure.

Stop encouraging personnel to do ‘brain dead’ evolutions that do not allow them to be challenged for reality. Seek out your partners in water safety that are not within your normal scope of contact and listen to them. Research and have your program annually inspected, equipment with minimum carriage requirements and maintain certification expirations.

Review you program and be honest in your assessments of personnel response and functionality. Ensure your budget is in accordance with the need and you put the hours in for security.

Protect reputation. Handle program pitfalls, be better problem solvers, be willing to accept your problems and remedy them before the next call.

If someone challenges your program, celebrate that individual, take up their case.

Do not be afraid. Be brave, because courage is contagious.

Your people want to learn, give them permission.

__________

Posted: December 3, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

PWC COMPETITION SOLUTIONS

CHOICES

We are imperfect in our power, drama and expectations. It is possible to control and navigate specific behaviors and expectations based on leadership and team principles. This is a mutable relationship built upon trust and enforcement.

This trust is dependent upon expected exchanges agreed upon by determined rules and regulations. Trust on the racetrack is also lifesaving and sportsmanlike conduct for competitor, staff and spectator.

These relationships are specific between several entities, associate governing bodies and staff members, sponsors, competitors and their supporting teams, regional and national pride, culture, boating rules and regulations, maturity, spiritual presence, equipment compliance, physical ability, sanctioned rule books and expectations.

This is a complicated blend of human directives.

Racing has a distinct pattern to it. Racing is a game. In the game there are rules, actions, weather and water conditions, human interaction, equipment demands and dialogue. In this game there are liabilities, and risks. This game holds disappointments, tragedy, success, ambition, fulfillment and enforcement.

Facts are important because they decipher truth. It takes an interview process based on facts and where those facts are derived from and how they are interpreted to arrive at plausible conclusions. The truth must be accepted. Otherwise corruption is given allowance.

A person can have all the answer that are appropriate in the room, but if the audience denies the answers, then the neglect will continue to operate with poor results the audience demands.

Race preparation is an extensive process. It is costly and bears aspirations from both staff and participants. The demands are vast and complicated, when fatigue is an admixture a lot of volatile patterns can evolve, some are in the imagination and some are concrete fact.

The content that evolves and is transmitted for racing is complicated. It requires study, proper training, vetting and education.

Fundamental understandings and expectations may be in conflict. To move forward as a competent race community, we face a myriad level of chaotic events, and structures that are based in factual domains.

There are many people serving towards the goal of a podium finish. Only a select few individuals will attain the elevation of a Championship attempt let alone bear the #1 plate.

On Friday, the IJSBA Awards for Amateur Ski Lites were to be gifted their trophies. These competitors raced on the previous Wednesday, which means they wait an additional 2 days for their awards ceremony.

They were not called to the stand up on the podium in front of their race peers to receive their due recognition for World Championship earned placings. After waiting through the entire awards program for their class to be called up. How could this happen? We have to perceive a lot of contributing causes and reactions.

The awards announcer and responsible staff for the awards did a poor job reflecting sincerity regarding the lack of accountability and a deserved explanation and public apology from complaints received. They may not have been aware of the situation regarding the trophies.

This could be due to multiple factors, such as staffing issues, fatigue, it could have been a communication error, or the chain of command may have failed. Trophies were stated to have been stolen after the Awards were completed.

However, once the alarm was raised by the competitors themselves emergency actions could have taken place at that time to make amends and modify some solution for petition of error or acknowledgement. Who would be responsible for this action?

Staffing hierarchy structure would need to be clearly outlined with operational guidelines to ensure program success.

Along with the Amateur Ski Lites Champions, likewise the Pro Runabout 1100 Stock Class Champions did not receive their trophies.

This is intolerable at a World Championship event from what appears to be incompetence in managing an awards program in hindsight. Staff needs to make admission on this and not cower in ego defense. Admit the wrongs, identify the issues and fix them, now.

PREPARATION IS EXPENSE

There are also Technical Inspection calls that are in dispute. My question to staff is how familiar are you with the 2019 IJSBA Rule book and the interpretation of those rules? Who mentored you and signed you off after a vetting process? How were you tested and what evaluations occurred? What are your qualifications?

I also extend this responsible accountability to the competitors. Many who do not have English skills and staff has limited international language skills, do you understand the rules and the spirit of the rules? Did you experience frustration in understand and comprehension of rules or expressing them to others?

When we look at a problem you must also look at ourselves to find the answer. Communication is the best place to start.

Interpretations must be fact based. This begins with the Technical Inspection crew and Race Director along with Scoring or Registration (if that applies). It relies on the documents and inspection lists that are filled out for each entry. This is also a responsibility of those in Staging to be looking for any infractions as the race vessels come to the line. How is this noted and conducted if at all?

It is also a responsibility of the racer themselves, and their teammates to understand and ask effective questions far in advance if they are not understanding a specific issue.

This also means that the IJSBA needs a dedicated staff member who is highly trained in human relations communications (able to handle stressful situations and communicate with compassion and stand grand when needed) to be accessible on the race site from start to finish with language skills. This person needs an iPad to document each question and answer and load it into a database for access. This can support evidence based appeal processing. This iPad can also assist in language translations as needed.

However, in the IJSBA defense there may be secondary issues not exposed here that should be taken into consideration. This is the only way to gain understanding and equitable solutions. Blame is easy to project, solutions are what people step away from, because its uncomfortable to be held responsible, it requires time and effort.

We do not have the full story, only the expressions of competitors who did not receive the benefits of their efforts. There was a press release from the IJSBA stating that trophies were stolen and misappropriated, this could explain a lot, however the racers whose trophies were stolen should have been contacted as soon as this came to light individually. People understand hardship, they can deal with it.

Staff and Management need to be educated on the protocols and procedures of problems that may occur from unforeseen circumstances and have what is called an ‘action plan’ or what others would simply say ‘damage control’. Sincere apologies go a long way.
People can handle the truth, but not to be dismissed.

Here is a Pro Tip for the IJSBA staff and other venues: I propose a meeting, take notes, race stakeholders’ public comments, structure the complaints and the timeline of problems faced at the venue. Evaluate the issues that took place with fearless courage. Issue public apologies. Ensure these athletes, their teams and their sponsors are given a platform for recognition after the fact for their earned efforts.

Secondly; IJSBA needs to responsibly train staff members to a higher level of functionality with organizational solutions for secondary controls. Staff members need to be vetted, tested, evaluated and assessed. Some people may not be the right fit for this job and they have to go away. Their Character and principles may not align with altruistic work. Others deserve more support and encouragement.

These people deserve a stronger leadership platform to assist them in the safe and competent production of a legacy event.

Perhaps it will take novice and seasoned IJSBA staff will take this into consideration and care about their constituents they represent with a higher level of professionalism. It would be helpful if staff would remember these simple pressures that people are placed under.

There are emotional and physical demands, lack of language translations from staff to teams that lead to frustration and misunderstandings. Many competitors who travel from all over the world, pay high costs throughout the year to compete for qualifying for this event, acquiring equipment, funding, sponsorship and travel demands.

It is demanding for both the supporting staff as it is for the athletes and their teams. There is a lot of emotion, hopes, aspirations and disappointments that are experienced during an event like this. There is the political climate, territorial issues and personality conflicts to navigate.

The IJSBA has disenfranchised many seasoned race event staff personnel and competitors. Some are deserving and some are incompetent rulings.

There may be financial considerations in these changes, personality or management conflicts. Whatever it is, solutions are potential for advancing the mission, vision and goals of Championship race events. It takes both parties to work together, like a marriage it is not about both sides, it is about the sum of the whole.

This problem is not just for Havasu, but worldwide. This has left a great void in mentorship, safety and event flow from crews and leaders. The time is now to address these concerns that have been voiced publicly by participants and former staff for a few years and organize a stakeholder meeting.

In defense of the current and past IJSBA staff, many are not paid high salaries, or they are volunteering their time, taking away from their work, livelihood and families. They sacrifice a lot to be a part of this amazing venue! They work long hours, in adverse conditions, and perhaps only once a year, or at local events, they may not have any training. Some of the rules and manners of racing may be different from where they are coming from in relation to this event.

Staff, you must hear the things you do not want to hear, you may shut down and become adversarial, that is not to your advantage.

Some of you may not be as great as you think you are. This goes the same for competitors. If you want to look at integrity in motorsports it begins with you.

Fearless review and inventory of your mistakes is the only way to grow the sport in unity. It’s not one against the other, it is everyone combined as a community invested in the culture and spirit of a dangerous and stressful motorized power sport. Otherwise carry on with the ‘Clown Down’ and drama, because it will only continue to slide downward with you driving it. It is your reputation you should be concerned about, not ego.

Do not expect affirmation or fame, expect sacrifice, hard work and personal achievement.

There are intolerable personalities who will continue to be a determinant to themselves and the race community by their own contempt and avoidance. There is nothing we can do to support folks such as this, they are unable to evolve.

LAZINESS IS AN ENDING

However, we as a culture can evolve by addressing known problems or recurring problems without ego or spitefulness. It will take effort and that is the problem. Some will inflict politics and strategy into dominance to undermine control. That is and has always been a challenge, but with personalities focused on unity a lot of that can be enforced and subsequently dismissed.

This is a strong justification for staff training and mentorship. Instead of focusing on the negativity, I have addressed concrete issues to solve. You may have others to bring to light. What are the solutions?

I am offering a solution.

If any noble IJSBA staff member who is willing and has the volition to further their competition event management skills, I would like to offer free training, mentorship and guidance to assist you in professionally developing your skill sets. I have the answers.

I also extend this same invitation to any race competitors who are interested in professionally developing their race career. This invitation will stand until the deadline of October 24, 2019 to allow enough time for sincerity in considering the truth of these matters for those who care and are willing to be constructive in resolution.

This is not about ego, company, nation or team bias or political affiliation, it is about competency in race management for both staff and competitors for power sport safety and competence. This commentary is positive in spirit and driven for the purpose of creating solutions and to deny future drama, blaming, shaming and mistrust of a sport that I helped develop along with my colleagues. Stand with us.

I have a strong pedigree in racing events and event management. However, I acknowledge that I have in the past made mistakes and I did make corrective measures after the fact. Today I remain in regret over some of my decisions that had negative effects on others. However, I determined not to make them again which I did not, and to apply myself towards a higher level of dedication to service, safety, accountability and communication towards others.

It is not easy to change, but it is the only way to move forward. Otherwise expect the same results. These are not new issues, they are just growing. In 2012 these same concerns were presented to the race community by myself and others, its now 7 years later and the issues are deteriorating. Many new racers have a sub-par race platform they enjoy today because they have nothing to scale it against. Those of us who are legacy pioneers know the difference.

What I learned about my mistakes was that I was not fully prepared to meet the demands I wanted to manage; I did not receive training because there was no source for such competency.

I had to retrain myself. In owning a mistake, the goal is not to repeat it. Once negligence is established as an awareness it is up to us collectively and individually to alter course. This means we must hear the truth, the hard facts, the mistakes and the full understanding of the situation and its reciprocal effects.

We must admit that these problems may have ancillary options we can understand and should. Ignorance is not an excuse. Safety is a behavior. Racing is not Fair. Staffing cannot rely merely on having a good heart, one must have competence and structure. Racers must come to an event fully prepared.

Not all racers are ready for the race track, they may not belong on a race track and therefore their scrutiny is most important. Do your homework, study, prepare, find a mentor or a coach, don't just show up to the starting line. Show up as a representative that understands the history, rulebook, water and your boat.

There is no value in pointing out problems if a solution is not offered. It is up to us as individuals to decide right now, what kind of a staff or competitor do we want to be? Do you want to be the person in the room or on the racetrack others will be able to depend upon?

The real question here is what are you willing to do to make effective changes? What effort are you willing to exert for solutions?

The past cannot be changed, but the future can be addressed. It begins with you, or it ends with you.

Private message this page PWC Competition if you are interested in accepting my proposal.
Those who do will not be disappointed, be prepared to roll up your sleeves and get to work.
Shawn Alladio
10.16. 2019

Take the Survey and Contribute to Change

KAWASAKI MOTORS CORP., U.S.A. Press Release

APPOINTS NEW PRESIDENT AND CEO

Foothill Ranch, CA – Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A. (KMC) welcomes Mr. Eigo Konya as President and CEO effective immediately.

After three and a half successful years leading KMC to industry-leading retail and market share growth, Mr. Yoshi Tamura has returned to Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. in Japan.

Mr. Konya first joined KMC from 2001 to 2007 contributing to record sales revenues in the U.S, which led to his appointment as General Manager of Kawasaki Motors Shanghai, Ltd.

Mr. Konya led the team that built the Kawasaki brand in mainland China, establishing the company, developing the sales structure and strategy, growing the dealer network and emerging annual revenue over a five year period.

Returning to KMC, Mr. Konya is excited to continue the success the company has achieved in recent years and looks to continue growing retail sales and market share in the U.S.

“It is a very exciting time to return to KMC,” said Mr. Konya.

“Kawasaki has seen fantastic retail growth in the United States thanks to the best dealer network in the industry and new, exciting models each year. I look forward to leading such a top-tier company.”

Mr. Konya will address the U.S. dealer network at the Kawasaki Dealer Business Meeting, October 7-12th, 2019 in Palm Desert, California, where Kawasaki will launch multiple new models for 2020.

Kawasaki Website for more information
__________________

Posted: October 14, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

TAKE ON DIFFICULT LEARNING

CHOICES

Stop taking the easy cheap route. That is a fast track to misery.

This is how you stop progress and cheapen the results. Don’t do marginal inspections. Use good quality and proper personal protective equipment (PPE).

Operate your Rescue Water Craft in a manner that your ancestors would be proud of.

Behave as if you read about yourself in a history book and the ending was good.

Our world demands the strongest, bravest and most educated to have the wits to surmount disaster.

PREPARATION IS EXPENSE

It’s no joke to be prepared! Maybe right now by reading this post it will motivate you to pick up and move onward.

Do not feel justified if you took on marginal training. You are just beginning.

Keep moving ahead with your education. If you settle you lost the argument.

Winning generates increase.

Losing declines potential.

When you give less there is no challenge, there is nothing you can do to elevate your opportunity. That is the essence of giving up.

This is not what any of us can afford in the dynamic and often times terrifying situations we will respond to that survivors place themselves in.

LAZINESS IS AN ENDING

If you are lazy you will never possess the capability to do anything that is challenging and requires of your efforts. Your team will not be able to depend upon you.

You will easily find the objections and excuses needed to say ‘I don’t need that, I’m better than that, nobody can teach me nothing’. This is how people filled with errors hide their potential and they give far less than their very best.

This elusive behavior becomes complicated quickly. It prevents that person from opportunity.

So ask yourself this? Do you have a goal of how you want to operate?

What is it? You cannot own it if you are not capable of defining it.

Then you must admit to yourself you have to throw your sorry ass head to toe into discovering that capability!
You should fear greatly with a terrible recognition to pursue your operational goals rather than being afraid to do so!

1. Articulate your goals
2. Write your goals down and expand 3 additional needs from each
3. Learn to negotiate for your maritime heritage
4. Learn how to protect seamanship skills
5. Know who you are
6. Understand what it is you want and what will be required to access it
7. Make sure you have other options, courses, opportunities and learning directions
8. Follow a mentor and honor their advice and person
9. The ocean will win because you have to be able to negotiate its reality
10. Know your boat as you know yourself

If you want to be a competent Coxswain, you have to practice being competent.

Otherwise you are practicing by your own volition constant failure.

And that is not something you should aspire towards in your career, ever.

__________________

Posted: September 9, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.