ACCIDENT BY SEDUCTION

HIGHER VISION

Seduction by accident has a root cause. Did it begin in training? Are the instructors knowledgeable and updated? Is the content delivered accurate? How would you know?

DO NOT allow a poor instructor to lead you to an accident. Do not endorse them and build their measures up, instead use due caution. It’s your life and others. Do not endorse dysfunction and all its variable levels.

DO endorse an instructor that cares about your professional development. Share their posts and insights. Support their training. Be vocal about their protection of reputation.

There is a hierarchy in place that is either positive or negative, you could call this good or evil. You choose which one you support and build.

Courage builds essential trust in the maritime community. Most folks attach themselves to the naivety of a damaging path and will do anything to protect it. Cynicism would serve you better, and then to move one step forward, have courage!

In courage you can reveal the betrayals extended in training. Here you can remedy the pitfalls and dangerous behaviors and stop putting your hand out to a biting dog.

RICH MAN POOR MAN

You can establish professionalism yourself by first taking control of your knowledge base and declining those who would undermine your trust in water safety.

Those who betray our water safety trust, the fundamental standard of safety that is often violated and undermines your reputation as well as the community; you have the responsibility to defend this.

The power of persuasion can be positive or negative.

You determine these results by volition and ultimately are the responsible "receiving' party for the negative or positive truths of response and team safety.

If you endorse something, you need to proceed with caution until all methods are tested and with accurate insights, not brand favoritism or ego.

And that ego……….oh yes.. that is where the trouble begins.

SCULPTURE TRUTH BY INVESTIGATION

All of you who are newer water rescue responders can change a negative culture of complacency if it exists in your association or agency - into a modern pursuit of excellence.

Give your training programs and equipment awareness Hell!

Bring people in your team up by associated methods of identification of the wrong that is in your program so you can unblock progress.

Keep your team engaged, invite their criticisms and suggestions. Listen to their advice and challenge it until you find the answers.

Usually those answers are not held within your associations and culture, do not be afraid to move outside your inner circle.

Park the ego and learn how to explore truth beyond the comfort of established programs. They may be severely outdated.

Safety is a Behavior, not an excuse.

__________________
Posted: July 14, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

Women who go the Distance on Personal Water Craft

Women Who Inspire

Meet Marta Sikora my former K38 student and friend. Marta came to the USA from K38 Poland to learn how to become a Rescue Water Craft Coxswain.

One day a call came for a request for water safety support. The event would stretch over 3 months. I got off the phone, looked over at Marta and thought a few minutes.

I got up and told her to pack her bags, you are going to Florida! She said ‘I am?’.

Key West to NYC

We began preparations as time was of the essence.

The original RWC operator had backed out and the event was in motion. Tom Jones was an extreme endurance athlete and this was his project.

Tom brought over his Rescue Water Craft and we went through it and got it ready for the journey. Marta and I went over her SPOT tracker, GPS and how to use a Marine Band radio.

She was going to be responsible for the team safety, recovery and navigation along the trek.

Marta operated a Honda Aquatrax from Key West Florida to New York City, New York. That was 1,800 miles of responsible navigation out to sea and though inlets. This was an extreme hardship.

Long Distance PWC Adventure Covered 3 Months

I know that women will be inspired by her actions. But this is not a gender specific experience, it’s a human experience.

Please listen to the video as I share her amazing story that covers three months. I am proud of her and honored to call her friend.

__________________
Posted: July 14, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

HOW MUCH DOES A SEARCH COST?

Big Crow Island, New York

How much does a search cost? How do people put themselves in these situations?

Easy to answer that - they never think it will happen to them. Then it does.

Incident date: July 10, 2019

Yes, we make mistakes. We know that. So what are you willing to do about that? Make another mistake and another?

The warning signals are flashed all over the media, but we have folks who ignore the call to action.

Seriously now, you don't want to be embarrassed or stress your loved ones out do you? Of course not!

Then prepare to stay out of the headlines and police reports.

These incidents happen for a number of reasons such as:

1. Poor preventative maintenance and inspection
2. Poor communication with family or friends on land
3. No functioning electronic communication devices
4. Unfamiliarity with the areas recreating
5. Unfamiliar with risk associated with decisions (no thinking of the worse case situation)
6. Not check the fuel level or riding distances
7. Running aground due to low visibility or not checking the tides
8. Not checking the National Weather Service or monitoring the channel underway for alerts

Naussau County police and mutual aid agencies rescued a stranded Jet Ski from the marshes Wednesday night, south of Merrick, in Merrick Bay.

A distress call was received about 8:45 pm and multiple fire departments including Merrick Fire Department responded for the search and rescue. The Jetskier was missing and his boat was unaccounted for and it was getting dark.

Merrick Fire Department Marine 1 had been searching with other agencies for nearly 2 hours. Their personnel heard a faint whistle blowing north of their location.

The three Marine 1 crew members confirmed this was a distress signal. They pointed out the area the sound was traveling from. If not for these alert crew members the outcome for this PWC operator could have been much different.

NCPD Marine 11 was notified and the NCPD helicopter flew to conduct the aerial search in the direction.

1. Nassau County Police, 7th Precinct
2. NCPD - Marine Bureau
3. Nassau Police - Aviation Bureau
4. United States Coast Guard Station Jones Beach
5. Wantagh Fire Department
6. Freeport Fire Department

ONE IS NONE

Shortly thereafter the Nassau Police helicopter located the missing person in the marsh on Big Crow Island, he was recovered and taken to Wantagh Park.

The Personal Water Craft Operator refused medical attention.

This was a significant mutual aid call-out requiring multiple assets to determine the location of the survivor.

Calls at night in remote areas such as this type of terrain are not always easy to access. There may be safety limitations placed on responders to make contact. Night operations are an entirely higher level of risk for responders.

BE THE ONE WHO HAS PREPARED

This Personal Water Craft operator and all others need to take heed to the lessons learned here. This incident should not be repeated but used as a case example for personal safety and preservation of life.

1. Bring a Marine VHF radio and have it connected to your lifejacket
2. Use a tracking device such as SPOT or inReach. Buy the Search and Rescue insurance. These have built in
GPS
3. File a float plan!
4. Make sure you are familiar with the area of operation
5. Do not operate 30 minutes prior to sunset, night riding is illegal and if you get into trouble you just
complicated your survival rate drastically due to exposure and low visibility
6. Do not ride alone! One is None!
7. Attach a high pitch whistle to your lifejacket strap. That is exactly what saved this individual, but the
search time could have been limited by better preparation of the Operator.
8. Carry on board all the Federal, State required or suggested signaling devices:
• Handheld Flare
• Electronic Flare
• Smoke Flare
• Water Whistle
• Signaling mirror
• Fog horn aerosol can
• Stowage protective case

Do not rely on a cell phone. You may drop it overboard, get it wet or the battery will fail, this is not your first choice for communication, but a Marine Band radio set to Channel 16 is!

If we count all the individuals involved from multi agency support through the command we are looking at over 100 trained persons having influenced this recovery to some degree. Not to mention the millions of dollars in assets used. We are thankful to have outstanding support from departments such as these.

But it is a relationship. The recreational boater needs to take responsibility for their choices.

Everyone must be prepared. If you are not prepared, don't launch.

There is no exception and no excuse to entertain.

You are 100% responsible for everything that takes place once you launch your Personal Water Craft.

Research your boating laws, don’t just take a course, make your behavior part of lifesaving.

How much is your life worth?

A whistle? You bet it is!

__________________
Posted: July 11, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

PREVENT ILLNESS

COVER UP

DO NOT EXPOSE SKIN

We work in a water world and its rift with hazards and dangers. Many of these are obvious, from predators to inclement weather and dangerous water conditions. We cannot protect ourselves from everything that is possible or probable, otherwise nobody would ever enter the water, yet we go to help others and assume that risk.

Our skin becomes soft and easy to chafe from friction on the seat or re-boarding, with the physical load of being a Rescue Water Craft Coxswain or crew member we require full protection for personal safety. It's really a 'no brainer'. Cover up so you can reduce the risk of abrasion or lacerations.

We need to know what we are dealing with and understand the things we can do to mitigate the risk measures that are in our control. Take care of your personal protective equipment!

K38 requires that students come to class prepared with their Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). This means full coverage to protect their body from scrapes and cuts. We do not allow board shorts, or students who are barefoot.

We know waterways are contaminated after rainfall when counties issue health alerts. These alerts are directed to microorganisms called pathogens.

Exposure to sewage-polluted water is the most common source of illness in recreational water users, even swallowing a small amount may induce sickness. Sewage makes its way to waterways most commonly through sewage overflows, polluted storm water urban runoff, malfunctions in treatment plants, boating waste, and septic systems malfunctions.

This is why we hear the recommendation to avoid contact with waterways for 72 hours after a rain event, especially near a storm water drain. Seventy-two hours is used as a general rule because natural processes help return bacteria levels to normal during this time period.

Ocean currents play an important role by diluting and dispersing stormwater runoff, which is why elevated bacteria levels can remain persistent at enclosed beaches with little circulation.

However, as RWC first responders we do not always have a choice when the call comes to deploy for a mission. We are boat based, but we can be splashed by water and maintain water contact. But we do have a choice in maintaining our personal protective equipment and ensuring it is ready to go.

ILLNESSES
We have all had one or several of these throughout our career. None of us have come out of the water without some kind of impact. It could be as simple as not cleaning your PPE and allowing an environmental for bacteria to breed.

They are a wide range of non-enteric and enteric illnesses. The most common is gastrointestinal illness (AGI).

These symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, fever and stomachache. Different types of polluted water pathogens such as viruses, protozoa and bacteria can cause serious infectious disease of AGI
Non-enteric illnesses include ear, eyes, nose, and throat infections

Some of the most common bacteria causing soft tissue infection after water exposure include Aeromonas species, Edwardsiella tarda, Erysipelothrix spp., Vibrio vulnificus and Mycobacterium marinum. But that is not all, we have unknown or unseen pollution to contend with.

A Streptococcus (GAS) bacteria
Group A streptococcus (GAS) is a bacterium that is often found in the throat and on the skin of people. GAS is most often associated with “strep throat” and impetigo (blisters on the skin). On rare occasions, GAS can cause severe, life-threatening illness like toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis (flesh eating disease).

Sometimes described as "the flesh-eating bacteria"

Staphylococcus (or "staph") Bacteria
Staph is resident flora of the human skin, meaning that it normally resides on the skin but does not cause disease. Staph is a gram-positive bacterium that can enter the body through cuts, abrasions, or by coming in contact with the mucous membranes of the nose, eyes, and nostrils causing disease and infection.

The infection often begins with a little cut, which gets infected with bacteria. This can look like honey-yellow crusting on the skin.

These staph infections range from a simple boil to antibiotic-resistant infections to flesh-eating infections.

The difference between all these is the strength of the infection, how deep it goes, how fast it spreads, and how treatable it is with antibiotics. The antibiotic-resistant infections are more common in North America, because of our overuse of antibiotics.

LEGIONELLA

The deadly bacteria species, legionella, thrives in the mist of warm freshwaters and enters the lungs when tiny legionella-containing water droplets are inhaled. It is most often found in public spas, hot springs, rivers, and lakes, but outbreaks have occurred at beach shower facilities.

Cellulitis
One type of staph infection that involves skin is called cellulitis and affects the skin's deeper layers. It is treatable with antibiotics.

The signs of cellulitis are those of any inflammation -- redness, warmth, swelling, and pain. Any skin sore or ulcer that has these signs may be developing cellulitis. If the staph infection spreads, the person may develop a fever, sometimes with chills and sweats, as well as swelling in the area.

Infection-producing germs that can lurk in water include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which causes swimmer's ear (an infection of the outer ear canal, known medically as otitis externa) and skin rash (dermatitis). Others include cryptosporidium, Giardia lamblia, shigella, and E. coli, which can cause diarrhea.

Diarrhea may occur when contaminated water is swallowed and driven into the mouth or nose. (do not swallow water)

What is Vibrio vulnificus?

Vibrio vulnificus is a bacterium that normally lives in warm seawater and is part of a group of vibrios’ that are called "halophilic" because they require salt.

How do persons get infected with Vibrio vulnificus?

People can get infected with Vibrio vulnificus when they eat raw shellfish, particularly oysters. Occurring naturally in the warm coastal waters, particularly during the summer months, Vibrio vulnificus has the potential to cause serious illness.

Persons who have wounds, cuts or scratches and wade in estuary areas or seawater where the bacteria might be present can become ill. There is no evidence of person-to-person transmission of Vibrio vulnificus.

What type of illness does Vibrio vulnificus cause?

Symptoms of Vibrio vulnificus in wound infections typically include swelling, pain and redness at the wound site. Other symptoms of Vibrio vulnificus infection include; nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, chills and the formation of blistering skin lesions.

Individuals experiencing these symptoms should contact a physician immediately for diagnosis and treatment.

ERYSIPELAS
Erysipelas is a bacterial infection that occurs in the top two layers of skin. It is also commonly referred to as St. Anthony's Fire because it can be very painful and cause an intense, burning sensation.

Erysipelas is similar to cellulitis but affects different skin layers. Streptococcus is the usual culprit.

With erysipelas, the skin infection is usually very red and swollen, and there will be a sharply defined border between the normal and infected skin tissue.

FOLLICULITIIS
Folliculitis is a relatively common infection of the hair follicles. It may be caused by bacteria and fungus and is characterized by tiny, red bumps that are filled with pus.

BLADDER INFECTION

A bladder infection is a type of urinary tract infection (UTI). This refers to an infection anywhere in the urinary tract, such as the bladder, kidneys, ureters, or urethra.

Most cases of bladder infections are acute, meaning they occur suddenly. Other cases may be chronic, meaning they recur over the long term. Early treatment is key to preventing the spread of the infection.

What causes a bladder infection?
Bacteria that enter through the urethra and move into the bladder cause bladder infections. Normally, the body removes the bacteria by flushing them out during urination.

Bacteria can sometimes attach to the walls of the bladder and multiply quickly. This overwhelms the body’s ability to destroy them, resulting in a bladder infection.

INFECTIONS

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), most bladder infections are caused by Escherichia coli (E. coli). This type of bacteria is naturally present in the large intestines.

An infection can occur when bacteria from the stool get onto the skin and enter the urethra. In women, the urethra is short and the outside opening is not far from the anus, so bacteria can easily move from one body system to another.

Cuts, Scrapes or lacerations

• Wear a full personal protective equipment that is properly sized, cleaned, fitted and no tears or holes
• Clean lacerations immediately
• Use good hygiene
• Wash you hands with warm water and mild soap and rinse with water after changing a wound bandage
• Use waterproof bandages for cuts and scrapes larger than the damage area, replace as needed
• Avoid touching other people’s wounds
• Don’t share razors, toothbrush or other personal items
• Use clean towels, bedding and clothing.
• Shower after each training session, scrub and clean skin, hair and under fingernails/toenails
• Clean your booties, wetsuits gloves and gear after every use
• Contact your doctor immediately if you have a skin, nasal, eye, ear or respiratory infection
• Be aware of alerts or advisories and monitor the weather in your area of operation.
• Do not train or be in the water with any open wound or scrape

Suggested Cleaning Agents
(please consult with your personal doctor, conduct your own research)

1. Water & soap
2. Vinegar
3. Bleach solution diluted 10:1
4. Isopropyl Alcohol
5. Antibiotic ointment and fresh bandages
6. Hydrogen Peroxide (sometimes not recommended for wound care)
7. Iodine
8. Colloidal Silver
9. Oregano Oil

Investigate the products listed above. See if they apply to you and how you would incorporate them or not. Safety is a behavior and its a huge responsibility. We need to look out for ourselves first.

This is a justification to clean out the bilge and wash down the craft. We cannot fully decontaminate a boat due to the foam and rubber components, but we can maintain a clean vessel and a dry bilge and make sure our PPE is ready for us to wear.

Our personal health and safety matters, so don't delay to conduct your research. Now is the time, don't wait until after the fact.

Reference:
https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/swimming/swimmers/rwi.html

https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Fact-Sheets/Meningitis-and-Encephalitis-Fact-Sheet

https://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/1981/0848d/report.pdf

______________________
Posted: June 30, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE – ENGINE EXHAUST COOLING SYSTEM

PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE

WHAT IS PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE?

It is a thorough understanding regarding relationship value of care and inspection.

Three Suggestions of interest:

1. Conduct proper water flush procedures for the exhaust cooling system and purge the lines.

2. Drain/dry all remaining standing water out of the engine compartment and bilge area. We like to use a reverse dry/water vac when the engine has cooled down, or simply sponge by hand and towel dry, ventilate with the seat off, or slightly cracked for airway flow.

3. Inspect and tighten hose clamps. Inspect gaskets and hoses for pressure release.

Corrosion inspection for the exhaust system

DRY BILGE

Do not store like this outside with your seats removed in a marine environment due to salt droplets, debris, wind and dust/dirt.

Make sure your post operations inspections are thorough.

You have metal to water conductivity with standing water.

Gaskets can become damaged along with metal parts.

Do not allow your craft to sit in water for extended ranged days.

INSPECTION LIST

Observe your hourly maintenance chart per the make, model and year of product of Rescue Water Craft you are operating.

I have suggested to you before to make a binder for your Jet Ski to maintain your inspection records and engine hours, so if you haven't gotten after that now is the time!

Metal sitting in water can corrode from salt contact

That binder you maintain accurately can save you $$.

Regarding cleaning/flushing: Some folks like using Salt Away, some use Simple Green and some use Dawn Detergent, regardless, effective preventative maintenance is your Jet's Skis best friend both internally and externally.
I make my own flush/wash.

Kawasaki Ultra LX 2018 Muffler system

Make sure you take care of your muffler system

You cannot go wrong by keeping your bilge dry!

______________________
Posted: June 29, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

HOW TO CHANGE AN OIL FILTER CARTRIDGE

OIL FILTER INSPECTION

KAWASAKI JET SKI® OIL FILTER INSPECTION

In our K38 courses our students are conducting the tune ups on their training Jet Skis. They will change the oil and when needed replace the oil filter cartridge. I'll run you through a quick review of what we have them do.

Sometimes the cartridge wasn't set right the previous time and it can be challenging to remove. Don't stress, you can get that project done with a little advice.

The inspection discovers there is oil leaking from the oil filter. Do not use the Jet Ski®.

Immediately take it out of service. If you see oil in the bottom of the engine compartment, or notice oil splaying around the oil filter or leaking, or the warning indicator light on the LCD flashes the code: OIL), the ECU will place the craft in ‘safe mode’ due to low oil pressure (3 000 rpm).

TOOLS

Cause of oil leak: Oil filter was not installed properly.

It is important take grease and coat the rim edge with the rubber gasket.

Putting the oil filter on the threads must be lined up appropriately.

The oil filter needs to be put on with the correct torque specifications.

Example: Kawasaki STX-15 Jet Ski® 2014 model.

OIL

ENGINE OIL REVIEW (Marine Grade)

It is important to follow the manufacturer’s recommendations. If the craft is under warranty have the dealership maintain the craft during this period.

However, it is important to know how to change the oil and oil filter in case of water immersion or ingestion. You will need specialty tools.

Oil it to be replaced every 50 hours. Engine Oil Filter every 100 hours or as needed

First Step
You will need to complete an oil change.

• Remove the engine cut off switch from the ignition post.
• Level the Jet Ski® on the trailer or shop cart.
• Remove the oil dip stick (When you replace make sure the O section of the finger pull is facing the cylinder)
• Place the oil removal tube (straw) down the dip stick opening.
• Four Stroke SAE 10W-40 Marine grade oil, 5 US quarters or 5.0 L.

When you drain the oil, make sure you replace as much oil as you removed. Do not overfill!

OIL FILTER REMOVAL TOOLS

The manufacturer recommends that you use the following tools for oil filter installation and removal:

1. Funnel
2. Eye protection/gloves
3. Ratchet
4. Oil filter removal tool

TROUBLESHOOTING

When the oil filter is frozen in place and is difficult to remove you will have to take aggressive removal measures.

Due caution must be used to not damage the threads of the lower-case unit.

You will struggle a bit to do this procedure. (Put some muscle into it!)

You will have to use the stubby claw hammer and ram the Philips head screwdriver through the can, and the can will have to be crushed.

You may ruin the screwdriver so don’t use a high-quality tool This is being done on an angle.

Make sure you are working on the angle of the threads to the casing to not cause damage.

Remember to hold the oil filter in an upright position because residual oil may be inside the cartridge.

Place an absorbent pad below the working area of the oil filter cartridge.

TOOLS FOR REMOVING A STUCK OIL FILTER CARTRIDGE

1. Phillips head screwdriver
2. Stubby claw hammer
3. Channel Locks
4. Fuel/oil spill bibs


When replacing the oil filter use the torque specifications: 18 N-m (1.8 kgf-m, 13 ft-lb)

Replace oil as stated above. Test the water craft using the water flush mount and flush instructions.

Warning: Refer to manufacturer’s settings and recommendations. Use at your own risk.
This review is not to be relied up 100%, have a qualified Kawasaki mechanic perform all inspections and maintenance on your Personal Water Craft to ensure a safe operable vessel. Reference materials: KMC

______________________
Posted: June 26, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

100 FOOT WAVE

FADING LA NINA

StormSurf.com clinical analysis of Storm #8 of the year 2001

Reference date: November 21, 2001

Storm #8 generated the largest swell on record. Beating out the huge Hawaiian El Nino swell of 1/28/98.

Forecast to be a rather local and moderate storm that was to track over buoy 46006 (SE Papa). Like Storm 1 in 1999, what actually hit was beyond imagination.

Days earlier 2 storms were forecast to move in quick succession into the Gulf of Alaska.

As expected, the first one developed and followed the forecast track. Generating a swell that started to hit the outer SE Papa buoy (46006) on 11/19 at 11 AM with seas in the 20-23 ft @ 17 secs.

This swell reached Mavericks the afternoon of November 20th with seas 13-14 ft @ 14-17 secs with swell 10.5 ft @ 15.5 secs, holding through the night. Nothing noteworthy but defiantly rideable at Mavericks. While the first storm took up residence in the Gulf and slowly faded. A second storm followed quickly in its tracks on November 19th.

It developed a small but relatively intense fetch area in its south quadrant with winds at 55-60 knots blowing due east. Carried by the Jetstream and fueled by the moisture left behind by the first storm. These winds found lots of traction at the ocean’s surface, already agitated from the earlier storm.

K38 at Mavericks

MAVERICKS

The new storm also tracked east at a very fast pace. Not allowing the developing seas to escape the influence of its winds, piling more wave energy on top of an already large swell (virtual fetch).

By the morning of 11/20 winds were still being recorded with speeds at 55-60 knots.

The northern component of the resulting swell hit buoy 46006 at 9 AM and held through 7 PM with seas ranging 38.5-41.9 ft @ 17-20 seconds. Very large but not off the scale.

Clearly, this buoy did not get hit with all the wave energy this storm had produced. With much of it passing south undetected. And buoy 46059 located 350 nautical miles off Pt. Reyes was out of service, it was ripped off the ocean floor from large swell activity. Further reducing the effectiveness of the normal early warning system.

Nearshore the situation got interesting. On the morning of 11/21, the swell from the first storm was still present at buoy 46012 (Half Moon Bay) with decoded swell at 12 ft @ 15 secs. As expected, by 10 AM the second swell started to build in with combined seas 16.4 ft and the new swell at 11.1 @ 20 secs and increasing rapidly.

The paddle-in crew was out cautiously catching some bombs as the swell jumped in size with each passing set. The tow teams waited in the channel for their chance to strike. By noon they got their chance as the last paddle surfers were cleaned out and increasing south winds took a toll on conditions.

Combined seas were 19.6 ft @ 20 secs with solid energy out to 25 secs and swell 14.1 ft @ 19 secs.

One hour later swell was up to 14.9 ft @ 19 secs. By now the tow teams were only shoulder hopping the huge sets that were pouring over the reef while south winds set up a strong northerly cross chop.

Even so, Carlos Burle managed to snag the biggest wave of the year, measured at 68 ft on the face.

Shawn working rescue at Mavericks

PEAK

The swell was interacting with the 15 second swell already present, creating huge waves breaking way outside the normal outermost reefs. By 2 PM the new swell was up to 16.3 ft @ 19 seconds, then up to 19.3 ft @ 21 second one hour later.

Shawn Alladio (K38) was out in the channel on a Jet Ski® at Mavericks and reported nearly being taken out by a set of waves. The largest being upwards of 100 ft. Based on the buoys, even larger waves followed after she made it safely to shore.

By 5 PM the largest decoded swell reading hit, with swell at 19.9 ft @ 19.4 secs and combined seas to 23.98 ft.

Whitewater was visible out to the horizon at most coastal locations. And longtime locals reporting breaks they had never seen were going off, but way beyond anything that would be classified as rideable.

Carlos Burle towed into a wave early in the swell of November 21, 2001 at Mavericks. Even larger and meaner waves broke that afternoon, with no one in sight.

Story posted here: http://stormsurf.com/page2/papers/history.html

______________________
Posted: June 23, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

THE VOICE WITHIN

GUIDANCE

Have you ever had an inner voice that rose up from a shadow area within your mind, and it shocked you during a rescue? You listened to the words presented and took the advice. It worked in your favor.

Do you think about it later and wonder if you are crazy? I have.

I’ve had this voice many times lend outstanding advice in a moment of peril. It is a simple determination of words. Albeit nothing complex or drawn out. It’s an actionable prompt usually.

This parallel voice, is it an echo of the mission or a position of the current experience? Is it an alarm to risk and changing dynamics?

There are things unknown taking place that didn’t happen in training, perhaps this is the inner permission to continue out of the scope of boundary.

It’s not the same thing as everyday thoughts that jump up like kernels of corn popping and then lay down, it is a more prominent alert.

The intuitive voice tends to orient me towards positive actions. Not ones that would cause me harm, although I could see a path to that could be fed for obverse reasons.

It seems as if its an integration of the risk assessment and a knowledge base. And this unconscious unified guide arises to help with a positive orientation. It’s a choice to make, I think.

I have listened to this unconscious awareness that is alerting my conscious behaviors.

I don’t know any other way to address this loud guiding voice.

I have given this a lot of thought and retrospective consideration. Do we call this intuition, gut instinct or a protective angel? I think that there is reason for these descriptions as well.

On November 21, 2001 at a large big wave spot called Mavericks at Princeton California, I had a memorable inner voice experience.

This was one of the largest recorded days of waves that were documented at Mav's. I was there working this historic swell on a Yamaha WaveRunner.

I had 4 of my WaveRunners being used at Mavericks, 1 by Jonathan Cahill, 1 by Paul Schulte and the last one being used by the Brazilian big wave champions Carlos Burle and Eraldo Guieros.

As the swell filled in towards the shelf off the Central California zone, the face of the waves began their temperamental approach. Outstanding big wave surfers from around the world were there proving their talent in this hectic watery plain, this is their rapture.

BLACKHAND

Approximately 1:45pm the wave faces were in stride with 70-foot faces.

The harbor department closed down the jaws of the harbor mouth for recreational boating traffic. I had a final conversations with Cary Smith a harbor deputy and I headed out again.

I got underway again, driving out to conduct another recon parallel to the jetty wall. Then across the channel, out to Mavericks and making calculated triangular search pattern for any mishaps that may have occurred.

I had conducted quite a few rescues this day and I was nearing exhaustion.

As I made another pass outside of the jaws, turning to my starboard quarter, I bounced along the jetty wall towards the inside section of the lagoon behind Sail Rock. I had a very loud and strong voice say to me in my thoughts ‘TURN LEFT NOW’.

This voice was loud. It shocked me. In fact is startled me even physically. I attributed it to fatigue and shrugged it off.

A few seconds later the voice returned “TURN LEFT NOW’.

When I looked down Blackhand Reef, it was angry and boiling.

Truly I didn’t want to go there; I had already experienced a mishap in that area before this day and I was not wanting to risk my Rescue Water Craft.

The voice returned for a third time, and it shook me. I turned left towards Blackhand as if following a command.
The water was rocking and white capping. I was alone and uncomfortable with this decision; nervous I was hoping to turn back.

Right before my decision to retreat a black head popped up. ‘Is that a seal?’ I said to myself. It was a surfer.

He did not have a surfboard. He had a black neoprene hood covering his head, his head was low in the water.

I did our trademark Johnny B and assisted him to slump over the rear seat on the re-boarding platform. I slowly drove out of the threat zone keeping an eye on him. We didn’t talk.

INTUITIVE

I passed the safety of the harbor mouth and headed over to the path that takes surfers to the dirt parking lot. The harbor water surface had a crosshatch texture to its surface from the wind, it stung my face, this cold wind chill. I could feel the cold shrug off as my adrenaline settled.

When I pulled up to the inside of the jetty wall and landed, he climbed off the PWC. He crawled his way out of the water, stood up, waved and at me at started his slow walk back to his vehicle.

He was trapped in his thoughts and my internal dialogue was waking up. We didn’t talk.

I was having a vivid conversation in my mind about this experience as I drove away. I looked back at his shadowy form to affirm he was not an apparition and this was a true experience.

I would never have gone down to Blackhand Reef on that day. Waves were barreling at 30’ all along that edge. I was alone, with no backup.

That voice has visited me often throughout my life. Is this what makes heroes? Is this the evidence of integrating experience with the choice of believing that everything will be okay if there is trust?

That voice saved his life. And mine many times.

I have been fascinated with the internal universe of our mind. As a trainer this is what I have done my best to make friends with to gain understanding of others to become a better instructor. To become a better woman.

I would encourage you to explore the decisions you make. Why do you make them? How have they benefited you and others? Did you clearly see results that stopped a mishap or prevented tragedy? Is it noticeable?

I believe that awareness becomes a part of a purpose driven life. Isn’t that where the essence of ‘a calling’ derives from?

Possible, at least I would like to think so.

______________________
Posted: June 23, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Sidenote: On 11.21.2001 the largest set came through Mav's later on this day. I was on the water with my dear friend Paul Schulte and Jonathan Cahill during that time. Carlos Burle and Eraldo Gueiros surfed the largest wave that year on this day. They won the XXL Big Wave category. The photo is from Pablo, whom has saved my life in many ways. I am indebted to his spirit.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

PERSONAL WATER CRAFT TOWING SKIERS

KNOW BEFORE YOU TOW

Personal Water Craft used for the purpose of towing and aquaplane device are to be of the three-seater capacity.

Three-seater Personal Water Craft designed for towing will have rear-view mirrors. Single and Tandem use Personal Water Craft are not permitted or designed to tow an aquaplane device with.

Some of the equipment types defined as a towable aquaplane device (TAD)

1. Foils
2. Inner tubes/floats
3. Wakeboard
4. Water Skiers

Do not drive or reverse back over the tow line. It will foul the driveline and cause damage to the water jet pump and the vessel will have to be placed under tow not faster than 8 miles per hour to prevent engine damage for some models.

All occupants on board must be wearing a USCG approved properly fitted and sized lifejacket.

Towing can only be done with 3 persons for a 3-seater Personal Water Craft and not exceed the manufacturer recommended weight load. For instance, as example a Kawasaki Ultra LX Jet Ski is 496 lbs. or up to three persons on board.

Towing can be accomplished with 4 persons with the older two stroke 4-seater watercraft which are no longer manufactured (date of this publication 6.23.2019).

In some states the Observer or Flagger is to sit reverse on the rear seat to maintain observation of the safety of the towing person and equipment. They are to keep a lookout. They are to have a required safety flag ready to display in case of traffic, an emergency or recovering the towable aquaplane device and person in the water.

Be mindful of the tow rope snapback and wrapping hands and fingers, which can lead to serious injury.

Wear protective equipment and a wetsuit to protect vaginal, orifice or rectal tears and impact from the water jet thrust. Pay attention to all the manufacturer’s warning labels of the towing equipment and the Personal Water Craft.

A few more suggestions for safety underway:

• Take a safe boating course
• File a float plan
• Learn how to right a capsized Personal Water Craft
• Keep intake clearing tools on board
• Bring a waterproof GPS and communication device
• Monitor weather on the NOAA weather channel

Make sure the people you bring on-board your Personal Water Craft are briefed on safety and the boating rules and regulations in your area. Practice in a safe area, observe for boating traffic and practice good communication skills with your team.

Inspect your equipment for damage. Inspect your rope and attachment points. Clean, wash and stow when completed.

PWC SAFETY

Does your state allow Personal Water Craft to pull water skiers?

If answered "Yes" to the previous question, are there any restrictions?

Alabama Yes Must have 2 mirrors, with a minimum viewing area of 10 square inches each, measuring a minimum of 2.5 inches tall and 4.0 inches wide. These mirrors must be mounted, one on each side, on the body (not the steering mechanism) of the PWC in such a way as to maximize the rear viewing of the operator.

Alaska Yes

American Samoa No

Arizona Yes Watercraft cannot be overloaded. All requirements apply.

Arkansas Yes Must have onboard an observer at least 12yrs or older and the PWC must be able to ride 3 or more persons. Mirrors are not allowed in lieu of an observer.

California Yes There is no exemption from having an observer with a ski flag that must be available for use on board the vessel.

Colorado yes An observer must be onboard the PWC and a skier down flag must be used.

Connecticut Yes 3 and 4 person PWC's only - must have a backward facing observer

Delaware Yes yes

District of Columbia Yes Must have a mirror and an observer facing the skier

Florida Yes PWCs must have a person, in addition to the operator, in a position to observe the progress of the skier or have a wide-angle rearview mirror mounted in such a way as to permit the operator to see the progress of the skier.

Georgia Yes Must be a three-seater with one observer.

Guam Yes Same as any water ski operations

Hawaii
Yes same as any vessel towing water skiers

Idaho Yes Cannot exceed capacity, skiers must wear PFDs, and must have an observer and flag.

Illinois Yes PWC must have seat for skier (no overloading) and PWC must have lifejacket onboard for skier if not wearing it...

Indiana
Yes PWC must be at least 9 feet in length and designed for 3 occupants. Must also have observer on board when towing a skier or tuber.

Iowa
Yes Must be a three passenger PWC.

Kansas Yes Must have an observer or mirrors to obtain a maximum view behind and hoist skier down flag

Kentucky Yes A wide-angle mirror or observer

Louisiana Yes must have a mirror or an observer

Maine Yes In addition to the operator, must have a person onboard at least 12 years of age, who is in a position to continually observe the person being towed.

Maryland Yes PWC's must be able to carry operator, observer and skier (at least 3pob capacity)

Massachusetts No

Michigan Yes Must have an observer and everyone wearing a PFD.

Minnesota Yes Must have observer or factory installed or factory authorized rear view mirrors.

Mississippi Yes Must have observer

Missouri Yes Must have an observer aboard.

Montana Yes must have an observer

Nebraska Yes skier counts as part of the capacity of the vessel/PWC

Nevada Yes Vessel must be rated to hold 3 people

New Hampshire Yes Must have an operator and observer on board.

New Jersey Yes follow all ski laws, including ski flag, observer must face aft to tend to skier. PWC must hold at least 3 people

New Mexico Yes Mandatory PFD wear, observer on board, seat for skier.

New York
Yes must be a three person or greater machine

North Carolina
Yes No person shall operate a personal watercraft towing another person on water skis, a surfboard, or similar device unless: (1) The personal watercraft has on board, in addition to the operator, an observer who shall monitor the progress of the person or persons being towed, or the personal watercraft is equipped with a rearview mirror; and (2) The total number of persons operating, observing, and being towed does not exceed the number of passengers identified by the manufacturer as the maximum safe load for the vessel.

North Dakota Yes Must have an observer on board and must not operate between one hour after sunset to one hour before sunrise.

Northern Mariana Islands No none

Ohio Yes Must have an observer at least 10 yrs. old on board.

Oklahoma Yes Must be designed to accommodate two or more persons and must have proper observer 8 YOA or older or two convex rear-view mirrors so placed so the operator can face the direction traveled and observe the progress of the person being towed.

Oregon Yes PWC must be able to carry operator, observer, and skier

Pennsylvania Yes one skier only must have an observer

Puerto Rico No

Rhode Island Yes observer over age of 12 required- must be designed for and capable of carrying the skier and observer and operator

South Carolina Yes PWC must have wide angled rearview mirrors or an observer. PWC must be rated for 3 people if and observer is on board.

South Dakota
Yes

Tennessee Yes Observer and/or mirrors

Texas
Yes Must not exceed passenger capacity

Utah Yes same law as traditional boats

Vermont Yes Must have an observer.

Virginia Yes Capacity of the PWC must be able to legally accommodate the operator, passengers, and those being towed.

Washington Yes None.

West Virginia Yes Must have an observer or mirror

Wisconsin Yes PWC's designed for 3.

Wyoming
Yes No. Same as boats

When referencing the rules above, please check in with your State Boating Law Administration to see if any changes or updates have been made.
______________________
Posted: June 23, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

PWC WAKE JUMPING LAWS BY STATE

WAKE JUMPING

Are you familiar with your State rule regarding Personal Water Craft (PWC) wake jumping?

Each State has different regulations referring to this activity. The ruling came about due to unsafe and negligent operations of Personal Water Craft riders. They would misjudge andjump into the back of the boat they were following.

Risk are heavy and complaints were numerous from boaters who were intimidated by this behavior. Striking a boat, man overboard or the operator causing serious injury to themselves and passengers.

Here is a list of USA States boating law regarding Personal Water Craft / Rescue Water Craft wake jumping.

Be sure to check in with your State boating law administrator to ensure the rulings are updated and you are current in your knowledge base.

Alabama
33-5-51(d) ....jumping the wake of another vessel travelling in the same direction in close proximity to the vessel...crossing at right angles in close proximity to the stern of another vessel or when visibility around the other vessel is obstructed...

Arizona
A PWC cannot head into the wake of a motorboat that is within a zone of proximity closer than sixty feet and cause one-half or more of the length of the personal watercraft to leave the water.

Arkansas
Unsafe PWC operation shall include but not be limited to: becoming airborne or completely leaving the water while crossing the wake of another vessel within 100ft of the vessel creating the wake.

California
No wake jumping within 100 feet of the another vessel creating the wake.

Colorado
Careless boating is defined to include wake jumping at an unsafe distance or whenever visibility is obstructed.

Connecticut
can't jump within 100' behind a boat if it causes you to go airborne.

Delaware
must be 100 yards slow no wake in incorporated area, no jumping shore break

District of Columbia
No operator of any personal watercraft while underway and within one hundred (100) yards of another vessel shall jump any other vessel´s wake while operating or in physical control of watercraft while on the District of Columbia´s waterway. When two (2) or more personal water operators are operating at a speed greater than ten (10) miles per hour, the operators shall steer their craft so as to be at least twenty-five (25) yards apart from any vessel to include any other personal watercraft.

Florida
Jumping the wake of another vessel unreasonably or unnecessarily close to such other vessel or when visibility around such other vessel is obstructed is prohibited.

Georgia
Within 100 feet of another vessel

Hawaii
per federal regs

Idaho
Can be considered negligent operation under some circumstances

Indiana

It is unlawful to jump the wake of another watercraft.

Kansas
Must maintain a reasonable and prudent distance behind the vessel.

Kentucky
A person operating a PWC shall not jump a wake in a way tha endangers human life, human physical safety or property.

Louisiana
Careless Operation

Maine
A person is guilty of imprudent operation of a watercraft if that person engages in prolonged circling, informal racing, wake jumping or other continued and repeated activities that harass another person.

Maryland
Pwc's may not jump or attempt to jump the wake of another vessel within 100' of the vessel. This is considered negligent operation

Massachusetts
The "unreasonable" jumping the wake of another boat is prohibited.

Minnesota

No wake jumping within 150 feet of the stern of the other boat.

Missouri
Jumping the wake of a vessel when visibility is obstructed. Becoming airborne while crossing the wake of another motorboat within 100 feet of that motorboat.

Montana
crossing or jumping the wak of another vessel when within 100 yards of the vessel or within 100 yards of a waterskier being towed by a vessel

Nebraska
PWC cannot jump the wake of a boat pulling skiers or tubers. PWC cannont jump wake of a boat within 50 yards of the boat.

Nevada
Vessels must stay 5 lengths away from longest vessel.

New Hampshire
Vessel cannot be totally airborne when jumping wakes.

New Jersey
cannot jump wake w/i 100' of vessel creating wake

New Mexico
within 150 feet of any other cruising vessels.

New York
g. Every personal watercraft and specialty prop-craft shall at all times be operated in a reasonable and prudent manner. Maneuvers which unreasonably or unnecessarily endanger life, limb, or property, including, but not limited to, (i) weaving through congested vessel traffic, or (ii) jumping the wake of another vessel unreasonably or unnecessarily close to such other vessel or when visibility around such other vessel is obstructed, or (iii) swerving at the last possible moment to avoid collision shall constitute reckless operation of a vessel.

North Carolina
A personal watercraft must at all times be operated in a reasonable and prudent manner. Maneuvers that endanger life, limb, or property shall constitute reckless operation of a vessel as provided in G.S. 75A

North Dakota
Jumping the wake of another watercraft within one hundred feet of the other watercraft.

Ohio
Becomming air borne while crossing the wake of another vessel within 100 ft or unsafe distance.

Oklahoma
No person shall operate any vessel in a reckless or negligent manner so as to endanger life or property of any person. No person shall operate any vessel at speeds over ten MPH while within 50 feet in proximity to another vessel.

Please check in each year with your State in case new laws are regulations have been udpated.

http://uscgboating.org/regulations/state-boating-laws.php

______________________
Posted: June 23, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.