Public Safety Law Loan Program

Yamaha or Kawasaki ‘Law Loan Program’

Yamaha or Kawasaki ‘Law Loan Program’

This program was set up through the efforts of the PWIA (Personal Water Craft Industry Association) in partnership with the manufacturers.

This is NOT a mandatory program for dealerships, it is voluntary and up to the discretion of the participating dealership based off of past positive or negative experiences with public safety agencies or a willingness to serve the community with quality resources.

You can go to the following websites to start the investigative process:

1. Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA
Kawasaki Dealer Locator

2. Yamaha Motors Corporation USA
Yamaha Dealer Locator

Kawasaki JET SKI STX 15-F

Participating Dealerships

Locate the nearest dealerships in your region. You will be looking at a 3-seater Personal Water Craft (PWC). Prepare a list of questions to ask the dealer representative.

Some public safety agencies also request for additional assets, however we are only going to discuss the Rescue Water Craft (RWC) which is the occupational term for our type of maritime asset, known as Personal Water Craft recreationally.

1. Yamaha-WaveRunner®

2. Kawasaki-JET SKI® (Ultra LX or STX 15-F)

Be prepared to conduct investigative work!

Make a list and keep notes on your contact progress.

Or you can purchase a 2019 Ultra JET SKI® ULTRA® LX MSRP $11,199. Sometimes this is a good option after you work with the
Law Loan program.

The Law Loan Program has been going strong for several decades!

Public Safety Agency Responsibilities

Make contact with the dealer leadership and ask if they participate on the “Law Loan Program’ for public safety agencies.

3. Write a Letter of request on agency letterhead and submit back to the participating dealership.
What you may be responsible for:

• Provide a Personal Water Craft trailer that is rated to transport a 1,000 lb. craft at 11.6” inches in length. (No shorty trailers, must be a properly sized trailer for the length/weight of the craft)
• Pay for any damages during the loan period
• Remove any agency stickers (do not remove manufacturer stickers) upon return
• Insure the water vehicle
• Professional certification for Coxswains and Crew operating the RWC (Rescue Water Craft)
• Rescue boards and accessories are not included. Rescue Boards may also damage the stern deck of a RWC so be prepared to compensate for any friction damages.
• Do not drill any holes or add any hardware to the craft during loan, do not alter the craft.
• Abide by the maintenance schedule and pay for the needed maintenance such as required hourly inspections and oil changes.


Yamaha WaveRunner VX Cruiser HO can be purchased for $11,499.00

Make sure you have prepared an effective annual budget for the following:
1. Maintenance Schedule
2. Hourly Maintenance Schedule
3. Training
4. Personal Protective Equipment for Personnel
5. Accessory devices (rescue board, tow lines, fuel cans, etc.)
6. Return damage fees acquired during the loan period
7. Fuel & Fuel conditioner for prevention of damages from the effects of Ethanol
8. Transportation: Trailer, Vehicle, tow hitches, electrical, tires and tie downs

Participating dealerships will need to sell the water vehicle when the loan program is over. These participating dealerships are for profit businesses and need to turn over the floor stock inventory. Be sure that you return the Personal Water Craft that you have conducted a thorough review of the craft.

I would advise you to do the following:

1. When you receive the water vehicle take photos of the top, bottom, port/starboard and interior of the craft.
2. When you are ready to prepare the craft for return prior to removing decals/stickers take the same round of photos.
3. When returning the water craft take the final third round of the photos for records.

Make sure that you ask in advance what fees you will incur for the maintenance of the craft and how long the dealership will have the asset for these repairs or schedules so you can adjust your operations in the field when you take the unit(s) out of service.

Keep detailed records of your training and maintenance, focusing on the engine hours in your daily checklists.

Make sure that every team member reads the Owner’s Manual and understands the content and is able to translate it effectively and surely.

Good luck in your search! We hope you find a matching dealer who is willing to support and has the appropriate resources to do so.

This is a wonderful program started by (ret.) Roger Hagie’s Public Relations guru from Kawasaki, he is a great friend, a Wake of Fame Inductee and a champion for public safety and lifesaving!

_______________________________

Posted 11.2.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

DEAD ZONE

Rescue Water Craft Dead Zone

The 'Dead Zone' is an area astern of the third seated position of the Rescue Water Craft (RWC). It incorporates the stern eye area, stern deck and the re-boarding handle and is referred to when using a TAD.

This area is one to observe for safety due to the range of motion between the Rescue Water Craft and the Towable Aquaplane Device (TAD-Rescue Board). This area is a location that we are aware of regarding a variety of movements and therefore have termed it the 'dead zone', meaning this is an area we try not to make physical contact with our hands and are mindful of body placement. It is a 'no go' area.

We utilize a developmental attitude of behavior regarding body placement on a TAD and try our best to minimize contact areas and hazards with a concerted awareness of possible strike zones, both from using a TAD and on board the RWC.

Be aware that not all operational situations will be possible to maintain efficiency in body placement or range of motion. These are best determined by the Coxswain training level, instructional content and familiarity with weather, vessel, TAD and not limited to being able to define the forces of action and range of motion and the objectives of training.

This requires of Coxswains and Crew members to have professional understanding and behavioral training regarding this risk area.

Items to consider during training with a TAD:

1. Type of RWC and TAD
2. Conditions of water and weather
3. Communications between Coxswain/Crew and training goals
4. Review, correction and counseling of supervisor and/or Coxswain/crew operations
5. Speed of the craft and turning radius applied with associated weight distribution on the TAD
6. TAD connectivity

It is impossible to cover everything we would normally prescribe in our training program for student candidates. We can give you some ideas to ponder and size up against common sense and water safety. Let's dig in!

Rescue Boards rest on the top transom stern deck and centerline connection point from the bow of the Towable Aquaplane
Device (TAD-Rescue Board) is typically affixed to the RWC stern eye.

We do not add any additional hardware to the upper RWC deck due to vessel and passenger safety. We would not advise
agencies or personnel to drill holes through the RWC hull and add additional bow eyes to the top deck. Especially if
working in flood environments or drawing bodies over these areas.

These could become strike points, facial contact, create entanglement or entrapment, wrap long hair (scalping) or garments and cause breaks/fractures/amputations of fingers if rings are worn.

Port and Starboard side rescue board tether points generally are affixed to the trailer tie down eye points underneath the RWC top deck bond line. The trailer tie down eyes are actually a very strong tow point, but rarely is there direct load on these two points. Generally there is a giveway or slack and shock effect depending upon the style of board, the interface of connectivity and the amount of weight pushing downward with gravitational force.

Rescue boards are not floating per se, they are dragging, pivoting, rising and lowering. They are a towable aquaplane device that rests semi forward on the stern deck of a Rescue Water Craft.

There is a pitch upward and downward at the fulcrum point of interface between the rescue board bottom deck. There is also interface of the bow tether point that can crease the topside of the rescue board if too much force is applied or if pinned against a fixed object or rolled such as in waves. Always touch check and visibly inspect your rescue board and retire when needed.

When in a training environment we coach our students as role players to understand the risks to bodily injury using a TAD such as placing their head when lying in a prone face down position to port or starboard astern of the craft and to monitor survivors body positioning or changing positions while underway.

When underway in the same fashion changes of body position will occur with the interface between water movement and Coxswain helms control and trim. There is not a lot of deck space however we have studied the most practical methods by observing RWC, board, water and human movements and have determined that the 'dead zone' is a clear reminder for personal safety.

It's easy to say and clear to remember. This is a non-operative area. No hands should be in this area between the board and the boat, these are pinch points due to the lifting up and downward motions between the two leverage points.

This takes some time for students to incorporate into their training skillsets, this does not happen as a behavior during their first rotation. It takes many reminders and self assessment to correct and enable the safety behaviors. These corrections can be mere inches and change while underway due to vessel movement or body positioning.

It is important to consider anchor points, handheld points, foot wedges (not entrapment) and the pivot or sway of the rescue board. This does not mean they are gaining any visual capabilities. This is a measure to protect the head from either lifting and rising, or dropping and striking the ‘Dead Zone’ area in case of mishap.

There are a lot of contributing factors. Video review of incorrect and correct methods may assist you in understanding the risks and determining what would be the best course of action with the make and model of RWC and board. This is a difficult discussion to harness without proper coaching, so do not use all of this as a set in stone way of operating. There are many contributing actions that apply, such as operator and crew knowledge, Rescue Board inspection, RWC inspection and a firm understanding of the waterway you will be training and working under. And then, add pressure of a real life situation.

This is also a safety consideration during transport of survivors. Another rule we would like you to consider along with the 'dead zone' is a safe speed transport set at about 25 miles per hour. There are many technical needs, so don't fixate on just one, we teach hundreds of variations that enable the operators to select their underway options.

Don't forget that wise saying 'where the head goes the body follows'.

Use Common Sense, Evaluate, Study, Learn and Correct

REVIEW YOUR PROGRAM USE

Let's recap:

1. Do not add hardware to the RWC top deck where bodies come in contact
2. Observe the Dead Zone area astern and be mindful of points of contact
3. Safe Speeds Underway (25 mph rule), crew communicates with Coxswain is speed is determined unsafe
4. Coxswains maintain a level, steady and stable RWC at all times, Crew maintains the efficiency use of survivor loading and
underway security and secures the final stop measures
5. Observe counterbalance measures between the RWC and TAD and Persons on Board (POB).

We spend a lot of focus time to work with rescue boards to gain understanding in simple physics, vessel/board type, water dynamics and operator technical abilities. We want our Coxswains and Crew to be 100% responsible for their underway actions. We believe this is possible with a strong mindset, knowledge base and policies that work for success of the mission.

The Dead Zone is a reminder that this area is not a safe zone for us, to respect our board and rescue board use, and we must be mindful of potential impact or strike zones when operating in dynamic conditions other than calm water.

Speed is a critical component of professional marine units, safe operations mean Safe Coxswains and Crew who maintain a safe and successful program!

There are typically three ways of operations for crew to consider and train under until familiarization occurs:

1. Laying prone face down on a TAD
2. Layering weight and body positions on a TAD (multiple persons on board)
3. Kneeling-bracing position on TAD as Crew
4. Sitting position on RWC stern seat

Please consider taking a class and find out what you do not know!

It's far less expensive than the long rough road of mishap review and repair.

We hope to see you in a class!

Posted: 10.27.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

IDENTIFY YOUR WEAK OPERATORS

BECOME THE STRENGTH

Identify Your Weak Operators. Identify your role as team leader or administrator.

Strength and Weakness are reciprocal. Insert either word and we still discover the same framework of concern.

How much foundational knowledge do you possess to manage a Marine Unit?

What is an Marine Unit Administrator? What is a Coxswain? They are the Operator. They are the Captain. They are in charge of the Crew. They are in charge of the ship (Rescue Water Craft). It is important to identify your weak Coswains for a variety of reasons:

1. Reduction of liability through competence
2. Teaming (building a cohesive unit)
3. Safety at Sea
4. Operational Integrity
5. Mentoring
6. Operational Acumen

It is the precision of opposites we identify. We can easily state this is the same 6 criterion needs for a strong operator or crew!

LACK OF EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT

When you can identify the weakness in your Operators you have a distinct advantage to identify the complimentary strengths in your team. This is something that needs to be conducted periodically.

How can you make an assessment?

1. Review the condition of the Rescue Water Craft(s)
2. Review the condition of the trailering and Transport equipment
3. Quiz the Operators
4. Skillset assess monthly the technical ability of your team
5. Rate the level of competency and assign the rating in the database
6. Describe the shortcomings and capabilities, make improvement on both!
7. Assign degrees of performance related to service work

If you have an Operator that is identified as problematic in techincal skills, but is high in managing equipment, perhaps a reassignment is necessary? Where are their strengths? What are they comfortable doing? What are the uncomfortable doing?

Provide an honest counseling session regarding performance, executive and completion of all tasks. Ask them if they would be willing to take on another level and manage that specific area of the program. Correlate that with documentation that will verify their factual performance and related success or defaults.

It is important that an administrator oversees and inspects the performance of the team, leaders and program guidelines.

You may need an outside program assessor to partner with who is unbiased but willing to check deficiencies that could lead to a lawsuit, injury, death or program destruction. There is nothing wrong with this, but everything goes wrong when it's not in place and considered important.

K38 Jet Ski Training

STRENGTH

Strength is a needed ingredient in program management and sustainability, but how do we measure strength?

Is id conducted by setting a program and essentially abandoning it year after year because its always been that way or do we determine to investigate the program failures and success?

That begins with the personnel in charge. Whether administrators, operators, crew or mechanics the teaming aspect is critical for future safety as well as present safety and program sustainability.

Make a commitment right now to review your Rescue Water Craft program.

Interview your team.

Ask them what they think is working well and what areas they would like to see changes.

Be courageous and represent integrity, as you may be saving one of your team members reputation or your own.

Care About Your Team

EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP CARES ABOUT RESULTS

Conduct periodic program reviews. Inspect equipment. Look at mishap or injury reports. Get the entire team together and ask them to share with you their concerns. Do they have adequate budget? Do they have the right equipment? Is the service of the boats adequate? Do they believe their skills are competent?

Review other mishaps. Can you see your team in the video or storyline?

...Otherwise the door is open for a mishap.

Don't wait until you have to learn from a lesson.

Take the lessons now and make a plan. A solid plan.

People do not have to get hurt, Rescue Water Craft do not have to be damaged to learn a lessonM, nor reputations damaged.

Backing up and slowing down your program flow can save your department and your staff intense grief and discouragement.

Review your mishaps. The story is in the actions and the subsequent behaviors can be alerted.

Ask us how we know?

Good luck, we wish you a safe and noble program that you are proud of and your people are operating safely!

_______________________________
Posted: 10.27.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

IDENTIFY YOUR STRONG OPERATORS

COXSWAINS

Identify Your Strong Coxswains.

What is a Coxswain? They are the Operator. They are the Captain. They are in charge of the Crew. They are in charge of the ship (Rescue Water Craft). It is important to identify your strong Coswains for a variety of reasons:

1. Reduction of liability through competence
2. Teaming (building a cohesive unit)
3. Safety at Sea
4. Operational Integrity
5. Mentoring
6. Operational Acumen

MANAGEMENT

When you can identify the strength in your Operators you have a distinct advantage to identify the complimentary deficiencies in your team. This is something that needs to be conducted periodically.

How can you make an assessment?

1. Review the condition of the Rescue Water Craft(s)
2. Review the condition of the trailering and Transport equipment
3. Quiz the Operators
4. Skillset assess monthly the technical ability of your team
5. Rate the level of competency and assign the rating in the database
6. Describe the shortcomings and capabilities, make improvement on both!
7. Assign degrees of performance related to service work

If you have an Operator that is identified as problematic in techincal skills, but is high in managing equipment, perhaps a reassignment is necessary? Where are their strengths? What are they comfortable doing? What are the uncomfortable doing?

Provide an honest counseling session regarding performance, executive and completion of all tasks. Ask them if they would be willing to take on another level and manage that specific area of the program. Correlate that with documentation that will verify their factual performance and related success or defaults.

It is important that an administrator oversees and inspects the performance of the team, leaders and program guidelines.

K38 Jet Ski Training

STRENGTH

Strength is a needed ingredient in program management and sustainability, but how do we measure strength?

Is id conducted by setting a program and essentially abandoning it year after year because its always been that way or do we determine to investigate the program failures and success?

That begins with the personnel in charge. Whether administrators, operators, crew or mechanics the teaming aspect is critical for future safety as well as present safety and program sustainability.

Make a commitment right now to review your Rescue Water Craft program.

Interview your team.

Ask them what they think is working well and what areas they would like to see changes.

Be courageous and represent integrity, as you may be saving one of your team members reputation or your own.

Care About Your Team

PROGRESS IS EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP

...Otherwise the door is open for a mishap.

Don't wait until you have to learn from a lesson.

Take the lessons now and make a plan. A solid plan.

People do not have to get hurt, Rescue Water Craft do not have to be damaged to learn a lesson.

Today there are service providers such as K38 who have gone through the scale of difficulty and formatted procedures that
protect reputation, reduce risk of injury and accident and are on the frontline of knowledge.

If you do not have a subject matter expert on your staff who is invested in the Rescue Water Craft community and can represent 100 questions that are accurate about a Rescue Water Craft, 200 questions about the environment and 500 questions about how this lines up accidents, you may need to reach out and have your program reviewed.

Backing up and slowing down your program flow can save your department and your staff intense grief and discouragement.

Review your mishaps. The story is in the actions and the subsequent behaviors can be alerted.

Ask us how we know?

Good luck, we wish you a safe and noble program that you are proud of and your people are operating safely!

_______________________________
Posted: 10.27.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

Constitutional Value

What Constitutes Your Rescue Water Craft Value?

What is your fundamental Rescue Water Craft fact presented to you filtered to a specific point of your actions and your agency perception? Can you decide what reduction or increase you allow or is compromised? Value can be determined as personnel safety and competency, financial, the importance, worth or usefulness of your RWC program, your program principles or standards, the benefit, gain or merit of your program.

These values are interpretive. To the extent of which is perceived by the group or measured by the instructor cadre and the expectation of the public for a reliable service to be performed. We care about your reputation and your program. We have posted information to rally the community to take responsibility and contribute to reducing the injury accident rate by competent behaviors. First you have to know what you are doing for it to be a secondary benefit.

I have said before ‘Safety Means Danger’, and this means that each of us are placing ourselves in grave danger. Grave is an Old English word for ditch and in the sense of burial ‘graf’ is a Germanic language for grave meaning for heavy or gravity, if we base the saying ‘grave danger’ in etymological roots for us we can use it as a reminder to be prepared to avoid the grave through mistake. Of course this is my interpretation and you are welcome to select your own.

How do you rank?

The facts we have are in the domain of education and distributed through information outlets entrusted to instructors. Or for the modern push we can say for those who view YouTube videos and attempt to imitate what they best determine to be the ‘facts’. Is this reliable and if so how do we account for leveraging the facts to interpret if they are determinable for our increase of safety and our reduction of danger?

Risk management is a solid aim, its truth lies in the details. For this we must remain constantly vigilant for our personal safety and to ensure our program stays in step with current changes in our equipment.

Yes, accidents will happen and so can injuries. There are RWC answers and information that is credible that can assist your department in mitigating these risks significantly. Conduct effective RWC research and do your homework, both at the inception of a Rescue Water Craft program and with an annual review. You will feel better knowing that you applied your best effort to the facts at hand.

Perception and facts can be targeted by groups, hubris, and the individual who reduces the structure of facts to a single point of values in the agency, community or individuals facts. How are these gauged? Usually after an accident or an injury. So once again, conduct effective research and be prepared to present facts vs. perceptions when the occasion arises.

Rescue Board Training and Inspection

MANAGEMENT

Any accident is a story that tells our behavioral trackline. Typically a lot of mishaps can be prevented simply by incorporating an effective preventative maintenance and inspection program. Often the facts are obvious, but ignored. Such as a crease in the rescue board or its anchor points are frayed, or the Rescue Water Craft hours are not maintained according to the manufacturer recommendations for inspection, replacement and care.

Compromise eventually catches up to us. It’s not easy to maintain a Marine Unit. It requires a lot of dedication towards program management, team building and a strong knowledge base.

Unfortunately often due to the demands of budget limits many programs are greatly reduced or in the process of reduction from a functional structure. Time is a big part of the Rescue Water Craft structure. Applying the appropriate amount of time to create a rule based program and to enforce its governing principles is key. This will require that effective checklists are generated for not only the Rescue Water Craft, but all the accessory equipment, training and maintenance needs.

If you are open to a suggestion, think about the amount of time allocated for maintaining your program. List the following:

1. Annual budgets: Vessels, accessories, maintenance, training
2. Replacement budget for losses/damage
3. Training hours focused on ‘training with purpose’. Make sure you are training for the results you can expect in the field. Forget YouTube videos for a while and look at your agency or neighboring agency past incidents and revisit the actions of the survivors you worked with and start from there.
4. Practice the ending! The transport, care and extrication of your survivors and gear.
5. Join the Rescue Water Craft Association and get connected with Subject Matter Experts
6. Attend the WaterRescueCon-the only RWC conference in the world.

When you take the lead, you are helping an entire team, their families and the public at large. There is no greater accomplishment knowing that you have spread a protective layer over many, including yourself. Not easy, but you can do this!

_______________________________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

WHAT IS YOUR CURRENT PROGRAM STATUS?

CHECK!

Program status matters! It's how you ensure reputation and efficiency.

As a qualified Rescue Water Craft Coxswain what are your operational responsibilities?
They are a composite of equipment and personnel needs.


Ask yourself how many of these are incorporated in your Rescue Water Craft Program?
Let’s survey now! Select the number of program plans you already have in effect:

1. Rescue Water Craft Maintenance Records
2. Training Records
3. Inspection Records
4. Certifications, Re-certifications (Physical standard requirements)
5. Incident Histories
6. Mishap Reviews
7. Dated Revisions
8. Weather/Environmental Notes
9. Training Videos
10. PPE Records
11. TAD Records
12. Trailer Inspection Records

How do you rank?

1 to 4 - AT RISK

5 to 8 - NEEDS IMPROVEMENT

9 to 12 - SECURE

Rescue Board Training and Inspection

MANAGEMENT

It is a significant responsibility to maintain a professional marine RWC unit. It requires first of all a proper budget. Second effect training for the areas of response. Thirdly it requires inspection, maintenance and updates.

If you scored below 9 as a minimum it’s time to get to work! Make a list of the areas you need support in. If you need your program reviewed, we can assist you with that. Programs should be reviewed every three years, and assessed annually.

We wish you a safe and secure season and we know you care about your program or you wouldn’t be reading this story. You are the direct link to your team’s safety and public confidence, we are glad you are in our community. Let’s get to work!

_______________________________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

MINDSET OF DENIAL

CHOOSE WELL

The deliberation to not act and go against standards of care, or the best practice is a serious violation of trust. Both personal, and public.

What motivates people to accept cutting corners, excuses, lack of leadership, budget and fatigue of not driving a program to successful completion?

Routines can be familiar but when one operator in a crew decides to deviate from the practices that were put in place, they open the liability door. Somebody pays the price. Others hide and live with grief and regret.

Sometimes personal character of an individual supersedes the motivation to serve the public instead of serving oneself. Manipulating a system for ulterior reasons, that are personal and not for the oath of service.

 When was the last time a mishap was reviewed in your department or group?
 How was the process engaged?
 Did you permit an outside subject matter expert to evaluate the data?
 Was the information distributed to enact change and address the identifiable issues?
 When a mishap occurs the obvious is determined. What did the operator, crew, mechanic or instructor miss?

Reputation can be evaluated on social media in a viral scope from all corners of the world and reference posters who may never have operated a Rescue Water Craft. Those posts will last a career span. Oftentimes they point out things that operators obviously missed, and its repeated hundreds of times, or memes and gifs go viral.

Many of the mishaps I review through social media had definite steps of setting up the accident that were clearly avoidable. But if the team instructor is not trained properly, and the student follows the same advice from the instructor, and there is no determination to challenge the training methods, it’s inevitable. Is this what people line up for?

Accidents, how often do we say ‘preventable’? It’s comedic, like ‘don’t do drugs’, or ‘don’t drive drunk’, or ‘turn around don’t drown’, phrases that have effect but are not practiced to stop the flow of risk. What does risk management mean? Safety is not a word, it is a way of being.

Many agencies should not have RWC programs. They are not ready. They have not conducted proper homework and they do not have the appropriate budget. But mainly they do not respect the craft or the usage.

Oftentimes those who created mishaps are rewarded with medals of heroism. This protects the mishaps from gifting the reward of progress and reducing risk for the next mission. In fact it enables the next disaster to go into effect.

Rescue Water Craft Training for Night Qualification

THESE QUESTIONS HAVE TO BE ASKED

Personalities are selected through a vetting process to match up to a specific job description, attitude and capability. They are put through paces, educated, corrected and evaluated to see if they have what it takes to qualify. Or not.

There are definite draws to the various water rescue disciplines from a variety of agency personnel from military to lifesaving. Certain personality types are easier to lead into excellence, while others may be less mature, or disciplined. Most of that is from peer influence and personal influences of upbringing, values, culture and spiritual commitments.

Some rescue minded persons are motivated to excel for personal gain, team effort, community support, private psychological drive and stacking up a value to the worth behind effort and the altruistic or personal rewards.

Experience and perspective come into play with the hours in the field, research and study, practice and industriousness. A conscientious person will pay attention to fulfillment of the mission full circle. Industrious people work very hard and can be irritated with the unproductive team members.

Sharing the labor load of the rescue scene is a conscientious person is going to work really hard, put in very long hours and be the last to leave. Persons who are orderly like to have everything in order and are always cleaning up behind everyone else, usually women tend to fill that role.

Sometimes they are over concerned about details and they may be disappointed in the personalities who are productive because they may be making more of a mess. Know how to orchestrate agreeable persons and disagreeable persons to try to balance out the complexities of teamwork.

Personal traits are a big source of conflict in teams. This can relate to mission work in tension, conflict and friction.

Knowing the various personalities it is imperative to place tested persons who thrived in the specific roles needed. For instance: It is important for an RWC Operator to be comfortable in the water they work in. If they are not comfortable, it may be time to replace this operator and bring them to shore support.

How do you identify a mishap or rate accidents? Moderate to significant or got lucky?

Oftentimes after reviewing serious mishaps that I know were preventable, I have to say, how could this department not recognize the potential for harm?

It usually comes down to a lack of boating knowledge. They may have knowledge that is excellent in other stages of rescue, but when it comes to operating or implementing a power water craft program, they have assessed a casual program when in fact this is a high risk marine operation.

Who are your Subject Matter Experts? How were they tested and selected? What world experience do they have that is recent within the past 30 days and 30 years?

Oftentimes when I review a program, the organization was not prepared to have a marine unit. They lacked knowledge of the craft, maintenance schedules and budget. But mainly they lacked follow through after training to ensure their program was sustainable.

Acquiring a certificate will not protect you. The entire program needs to be reviewed annually. All mishaps must be reviewed and adjusted. Outside sources should be sought for additional knowledge based on modernizing any loopholes. Personal Protective Equipment has to be effective and replaced as needed along with RWC accessory devices.

Boating rules and regulations are constantly broken by public safety agencies using Rescue Water Craft. Lifejackets are not worn, rules of the road and not utilized, boating basics are not incorporated properly. Most of this is because training programs are outdated and incomplete.

Who is the program instructor and who backs their certification. Did your department determine if their certification was current and verifiable? Who wrote their training program, what type of craft and program management needs were resourced? How was this data entered and how is the program monitored and by whom?

How are the operators evaluated and why is their certification not revoked from a mishap and they get rolled back to training? How is the discipline process protected for teams, and who is the person monitoring and enforcing the program?

Rescue Board Training and Inspection

The community is fragmented by not conducted effective research. Instructors are self-proclaimed, self appointed or appointed by the agency and not evaluated annually. Instructors need to be assessed annually. Where does a RWC operator go for new content? Are they stepping outside their domain and going to where the value structure is: private enterprise.

People like to belong to something. They will affiliate with personalities that correspond with their own. Sometimes this is negative instead of creative. Creatures of comfort may protect hubris and not allow the science of physics to advance our culture.

Are you willing to let one of your team mates die and possibly yourself? Forget about the survivor, lets talk about the team. You cannot afford to be rescued during a rescue. How valuable is your career and reputation to you and your family? If you start with these simple values and expand them, it will be much easier to tune a program.

The Rescue Water Craft Association (RWCA) is the sole governing body for the RWC community. There is no other sole source that offers advances in the generation of knowledge. Others are taking micro steps. The best predictor for structure and rules applied comes from not only pioneers but those connected to the industry and a variety of water way needs, agency perspectives and direction.

The RWCA is our community peer group, it scales iinternationally. What we do is dangerous. It’s extremely dangerous. Think about it and let that sink in. Once you surrender to the risk involved it will be easier to being the process of engaging this risk to mitigate the flaws that exist and to clearly determine where they are and what can happen.

Because You Care.

Join today: RESCUE WATER CRAFT ASSOCIATION

Document Your RWC Program Results

A SWIM IN THE PARK

USCG RESCUE SWIMMER TRAINING PROGRAM

A Swim in the Park is a story from our friend David.

David Pu'u is a K38 alumni and also a friend. He has chronicled many of a K38 Way of Training course through his lens.

He is a professional photographer and husband to Donna Pu'u who owns Betty Belts which is also my jewelry sponsor. Both of these humans are outstanding representations of what is right in humanity.

Take a moment to get to know David................

Jet Pump

Instructor Shawn Alladio

ASTORIA

I found myself in a wary mindset as the Air Alaska jet lifted off an Arizona runway. Shawn Alladio and I watched the desert recede below us. We are both speed junkies, so found ourselves smiling as we accelerated into the blue morning sky on the last leg of our flight to Portland Oregon.

We were enroute to Astoria and our ultimate destination, the USCG Station at Tongue Point. Shawn sometimes invites me along as she engages her job as head of K38 Rescue, a global ocean safety and training organization, which is an internationally recognized specialist in PWC (personal watercraft, aka jet ski) operations.

Jet Pump

RWC Lifesavers

PARTICIPATE

This week, Shawn was on assignment to work with the USCG STAN Team, which consisted of Five Advanced Rescue Swimmers who were building a course for the USCG on PWC operations, a new direction for the Coast Guard.

I was wary, because I knew we would be working in the Colombia River foul area off Cape Disappointment which is a series of sand bars in open ocean. I also had seen the film The Guardian, which was shot where we were going, and which documented the life and death of one of the best Advanced Rescue Swimmers ever. Then there are the countless videos of Rescue Boat training I have watched, which were filmed there.

The Bar is an infamous and legendary training ground for the CG. It would be cold, have weather, and the conditions would be whatever the Northern Pacific decided. Knowing the ocean. I was thinking about this. The proverbial running into the pit, with the best watermen and operators in the world as they acquired new skills.

Shawn has mentored me well over the years. My deep understanding of the ocean and skill in it were morphing as age is want to do to one. And here I was, seated alongside a woman who would be supervising the elite of our country’s rescue personnel. I guess that is why I would call this an adventure: some unknowns existed, and conditions could be anything.

To read the rest of the story please go to:

A Swim In The Park

LAW LOAN PROGRAM

PWC LAW LOAN PROGRAM

Yamaha and Kawasaki Public Safety Law Loan Program.

Personal Watercraft Industry Association Law Loan Program This program was set up through the PWIA for public safety agencies to receive loaner craft through participating dealerships

The following information is intended to help your agency to apply for use of Yamaha Water Vehicles in your boating related Public Safety work. The focal point of the program is the local Yamaha Dealer.

Once your documents are prepared you should contact the local Yamaha Water Vehicle dealer in your region.

They in turn will endorse the application and forward it to Yamaha Motors Corporation USA, with their approval to order the unit or units specified in your request. The exceptions to this otherwise straight forward process are the limitations of Yamaha's inventory (a seasonal consideration), and the willingness of the local Yamaha dealer whose participation is strictly voluntary.

In 2018, the PWIA Law Loan Program entered its 30th year supporting public and federal safety agencies with personal watercraft from Yamaha Motors Corporation USA, and Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA. The program began in 1989.

This program has essentially the same terms and conditions in 2012 that it had at its beginnings in 1989, when it was launched. In just the past year over 100 agencies acquired loan units through their local Kawasaki JET SKI® watercraft dealers.

K38 Training Kawasaki TS Jet Ski

CELEBRATING 30 YEARS

In the 22 years of operation, the program has loaned approximately 4000 machines to well over 700 individual agencies. The value of these loans reaches over $20 million.

This program has been a big supporter of American communities saving taxpayers monies and supporting our local law enforcement and Search and Rescue groups.

K38 has been providing Rescue Water Craft boat operations qualification training for these agencies in concert with the PWIA Law Loan Program since 1989.

K38 has assisted hundreds of public safety agencies and thousands of personnel in competency training for these unique small boats.

K38 Training Rescue Water Craft

KAWASAKI PUBLIC SAFETY LAW LOAN PROGRAM

POINTS TO COVER

1. Contact Information: Name, Address, Fax, Email, Agency Name and Contact Person

2. Contact Name and Number of the day (hours of operation) office of the day-to-day officer responsible for the loaned units

3. A brief statement regarding the proposed use or application of the vessel(s), (units)

4. A statement that the agency will be responsible for the routine maintenance and repair of the craft

5. A statement that the units will be returned in a condition of normal wear. Any damages the dealership notes beyond that will be the responsibility of the agency to repair.

6. A statement that the agency will assume all liability for the operation of the craft while in their possession.
As mentioned above, take this letter to your local Yamaha or Kawasaki Water Vehicle Dealer. They will add their endorsement and forward it to our office here in California or Georgia so the machine can be ordered once approved.

You can find a local Yamaha or Kawasaki dealer through their respective websites. Use your area code to conduct a search.

With the recent economic downturn many local dealerships have moved or closed, or perhaps are not participating on the law loan program. You will have to be assertive in your search if your local dealership has closed.

You do not have to stay within your city, you can roam for other surrounding areas to contact dealerships. A dealership will only have so many units available for the program.

POINTS TO COVER

1. Contact Information: Name, Address, Fax, Email, Agency Name and Contact Person

2. Contact Name and Number of the day (hours of operation) office of the day-to-day officer responsible for the loaned units

3. A brief statement regarding the proposed use or application of the vessel(s), (units)

4. A statement that the agency will be responsible for the routine maintenance and repair of the craft

5. A statement that the units will be returned in a condition of normal wear. Any damages the dealership notes beyond that will be the responsibility of the agency to repair.

6. A statement that the agency will assume all liability for the operation of the craft while in their possession.
As mentioned above, take this letter to your local Yamaha or Kawasaki Water Vehicle Dealer. They will add their endorsement and forward it to our office here in California or Georgia so the machine can be ordered once approved.

You can find a local Yamaha or Kawasaki dealer through their respective websites. Use your area code to conduct a search.

With the recent economic downturn many local dealerships have moved or closed, or perhaps are not participating on the law loan program. You will have to be assertive in your search if your local dealership has closed.

You do not have to stay within your city, you can roam for other surrounding areas to contact dealerships. A dealership will only have so many units available for the program.

K38 RECOMMENDS: THINGS TO KNOW IN ADVANCE

Good thing you are reading this! I am going to save you frustration and give you what you need:

PERSPECTIVE

1. Trailers are not included, you will need to supply your own transportation and tie downs

2. You will need to supply additional lanyards for each person on your team and replace them if worn or damaged. If you have a Bombardier, Sea Doo, you will need to have each digital lanyard coded alike off their MPEM program so your lanyards can be keyed the same. Digital keys and lanyards are not interchangeable! If you lose or break them you will not be able to start your craft.

3. Bathing suits are not to be worn, your crew must be wearing full PPE protection, and a USCG approved lifejacket, properly fitted and sized

4. Enter into effective dialogue with your loaner dealership. Do not make any make any
assumptions. Your department is held responsible for any damages to the craft upon return. Put aside an amount of money for repairs or maintenance for your program.

5. Depending upon the make, model, year and agreement, your watercraft will need a tune-up and oil change every 30-50 hours of use. (Oil filter, spark plugs, oil change)

6. Your team will need to understand how to maintain and care for craft.

7. Keep hourly logs on the boats so you can keep your maintenance hours in check.

8. Your operators need to be physically fit. This is an active ride.

9. Your operators need to know how to swim and should be evaluated wearing their full PPE kit

10. Your operators need to have their basic boating skills and current credentials in order. Our K38/NASBLA/NSBC instruction program endorses certification for a period of three years upon expiration. This is a boating standard. No exemptions! Equipment, laws, rules and regulations change, you must stay current with all your operational needs

PWC Manufacturers
1. BRP Sea Doo
2. Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA
3. Yamaha Motors Corporation USA

ABOUT PWIA

Personal Watercraft Industry Association (PWIA) represents U.S. personal watercraft manufacturers. Founded in 1987, the organization was created to promote the safe and responsible operation of personal watercraft. PWIA provides a unified voice for the segment, and represents the interests of personal watercraft manufacturers in legislative and regulatory concerns.

Content Creator - Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Personal Watercraft Industry Law Loan Program

PUBLIC AGENCY LAW LOAN PROGRAM

In 2018, the PWIA Law Loan Program entered its 30th year supporting public and federal safety agencies with personal watercraft from Yamaha Motors Corporation USA, and Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA. The program began in 1989.

This program has essentially the same terms and conditions in 2012 that it had at its beginnings in 1989, when it was launched. In just the past year over 100 agencies acquired loan units through their local Kawasaki JET SKI® watercraft dealers.

The history of the Public Agency Law Loan Program began in Southern California. The champion of the Public Agency Law Loan Program came through the efforts of Mr. Roger Hagie. Roger was an employee of Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA (KMC) and determined in the late 1980's that this program needed to be implemented to serve public safety. He had the vision to determine that these unique small power craft would become a patrol and lifesaving mainstay.

He worked along with fellow Kawasaki staff member Ms. Jan Plessner in Public Affairs and Mr. John Donaldson from Yamaha Motors Corporation USA to support programs across the United States, of which K38 was an early participant as a supporting instructor.

K38 Surf Rescue Training Kawasaki TS Jet Ski

CELEBRATING 30 YEARS

In the 22 years of operation, the program has loaned approximately 4000 machines to well over 700 individual agencies. The value of these loans reaches over $20 million.

This program has been a big supporter of American communities saving taxpayers monies and supporting our local law enforcement and Search and Rescue groups.

K38 has been providing Rescue Water Craft boat operations qualification training for these agencies in concert with the PWIA Law Loan Program since 1989.

K38 has assisted hundreds of public safety agencies and thousands of personnel in competency training for these unique small boats.

K38 Training Kawasaki Tandem Sport Jet Ski Sacramento Sheriff

KAWASAKI PUBLIC SAFETY LAW LOAN PROGRAM

Regardless if an agency has a seasoned marine unit or are at their conceptual program design, we can assist you in answering the question and concerns you have for the development of your RWC Marine Unit (Rescue Water Craft).

K38 along with the American Watercraft Association (AWA) have provided free training programs to select agencies nationwide through the H20 Responder Safety Days.

Content Creator - Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care