California Boating Accident Report

REPORTING

ACCIDENT REPORT FORMS

Boating Accident Report (BAR) Form
Boat Operator Use

BAR

Vessel Accident Report (VAR) Form
Law Enforcement Use

VAR-DPR128
VAR-DPR128A
VAR-2-DPR128B

Go to this link to download the form: BAR report

WHEN & HOW TO REPORT A BOATING ACCIDENT

WHEN?
According to state law, a boat owner/operator must report their boat accident to California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW) if the accident results in death, disappearance or injury to a person requiring medical attention beyond first aid, damage to a vessel or other property exceeding $500 or complete loss of a vessel, regardless of value. Boat accidents must be reported within specific time periods.

Reports must be submitted to DBW within 48 hours of an accident that involves:

Death occurring within 24 hours of the accident
Disappearance of a person
Injury beyond first aid
Reports must be submitted to DBW within 10 days of an accident that involves:

A person who dies more than 24 hours after an accident occurs
Property damage exceeding $500, or there is a complete loss of a vessel

HOW?

The operator, owner, or, if neither are able, another party involved in an accident that fits one of the above criteria should complete a boating accident report (Form BAR-1)

Bodily Injury or Vessel Damage

Send In Your Report

Reports should be signed and mailed, or faxed to:

California Division of Boating and Waterways
Attn: Boating Accident Unit
One Capitol Mall, Suite 410
Sacramento, CA 95814
Fax: (916) 327-1772

When submitting reports by mail, keep a copy for your records.

PURPOSE
DBW collects and analyzes boating accident reports to develop safety strategies and make recommendations in the interest of reducing boating accidents, injuries and fatalities on California’s waterways.

Information contained in the reports is confidential and may not be used in prosecuting any violations which may have occurred, nor in civil litigation of any kind.

Each year, DBW releases a comprehensive study of boating accidents in California, which provides information on accidents, fatalities, and injuries. This report, California Boating Accident Report, includes special topics such as personal watercraft, youth operators, and fatal alcohol-related accidents.
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Posted: 11.3.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

Public Safety Law Loan Program

Yamaha or Kawasaki ‘Law Loan Program’

Yamaha or Kawasaki ‘Law Loan Program’

This program was set up through the efforts of the PWIA (Personal Water Craft Industry Association) in partnership with the manufacturers.

This is NOT a mandatory program for dealerships, it is voluntary and up to the discretion of the participating dealership based off of past positive or negative experiences with public safety agencies or a willingness to serve the community with quality resources.

You can go to the following websites to start the investigative process:

1. Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA
Kawasaki Dealer Locator

2. Yamaha Motors Corporation USA
Yamaha Dealer Locator

Kawasaki JET SKI STX 15-F

Participating Dealerships

Locate the nearest dealerships in your region. You will be looking at a 3-seater Personal Water Craft (PWC). Prepare a list of questions to ask the dealer representative.

Some public safety agencies also request for additional assets, however we are only going to discuss the Rescue Water Craft (RWC) which is the occupational term for our type of maritime asset, known as Personal Water Craft recreationally.

1. Yamaha-WaveRunner®

2. Kawasaki-JET SKI® (Ultra LX or STX 15-F)

Be prepared to conduct investigative work!

Make a list and keep notes on your contact progress.

Or you can purchase a 2019 Ultra JET SKI® ULTRA® LX MSRP $11,199. Sometimes this is a good option after you work with the
Law Loan program.

The Law Loan Program has been going strong for several decades!

Public Safety Agency Responsibilities

Make contact with the dealer leadership and ask if they participate on the “Law Loan Program’ for public safety agencies.

3. Write a Letter of request on agency letterhead and submit back to the participating dealership.
What you may be responsible for:

• Provide a Personal Water Craft trailer that is rated to transport a 1,000 lb. craft at 11.6” inches in length. (No shorty trailers, must be a properly sized trailer for the length/weight of the craft)
• Pay for any damages during the loan period
• Remove any agency stickers (do not remove manufacturer stickers) upon return
• Insure the water vehicle
• Professional certification for Coxswains and Crew operating the RWC (Rescue Water Craft)
• Rescue boards and accessories are not included. Rescue Boards may also damage the stern deck of a RWC so be prepared to compensate for any friction damages.
• Do not drill any holes or add any hardware to the craft during loan, do not alter the craft.
• Abide by the maintenance schedule and pay for the needed maintenance such as required hourly inspections and oil changes.


Yamaha WaveRunner VX Cruiser HO can be purchased for $11,499.00

Make sure you have prepared an effective annual budget for the following:
1. Maintenance Schedule
2. Hourly Maintenance Schedule
3. Training
4. Personal Protective Equipment for Personnel
5. Accessory devices (rescue board, tow lines, fuel cans, etc.)
6. Return damage fees acquired during the loan period
7. Fuel & Fuel conditioner for prevention of damages from the effects of Ethanol
8. Transportation: Trailer, Vehicle, tow hitches, electrical, tires and tie downs

Participating dealerships will need to sell the water vehicle when the loan program is over. These participating dealerships are for profit businesses and need to turn over the floor stock inventory. Be sure that you return the Personal Water Craft that you have conducted a thorough review of the craft.

I would advise you to do the following:

1. When you receive the water vehicle take photos of the top, bottom, port/starboard and interior of the craft.
2. When you are ready to prepare the craft for return prior to removing decals/stickers take the same round of photos.
3. When returning the water craft take the final third round of the photos for records.

Make sure that you ask in advance what fees you will incur for the maintenance of the craft and how long the dealership will have the asset for these repairs or schedules so you can adjust your operations in the field when you take the unit(s) out of service.

Keep detailed records of your training and maintenance, focusing on the engine hours in your daily checklists.

Make sure that every team member reads the Owner’s Manual and understands the content and is able to translate it effectively and surely.

Good luck in your search! We hope you find a matching dealer who is willing to support and has the appropriate resources to do so.

This is a wonderful program started by (ret.) Roger Hagie’s Public Relations guru from Kawasaki, he is a great friend, a Wake of Fame Inductee and a champion for public safety and lifesaving!

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Posted 11.2.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

CHECK YOUR MEDICATIONS

BECAUSE WE CARE

WHAT MEDICATIONS WILL PREVENT FIELD TRAINING PARTICIPATION?

While most medications don't affect driving ability, some prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) medicines can cause reactions that may make it unsafe to drive. This includes operating a Rescue Water Craft (RWC).

These reactions may include:
• Sleepiness/drowsiness
• Blurred vision
• Dizziness
• Slowed movement
• Fainting
• Inability to focus or pay attention
• Nausea
• Excitability

Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist what medications could prevent your participation during training days.
Driving or operating a RWC while on medications can also be a legal issue. State laws differ, but being found driving under the influence of certain medications (prescription and OTC products) could get you in the same kind of trouble as people caught driving under the influence of alcohol.

Products That Require Caution

Knowing how your medications—or any combination of them—affect your ability to drive is clearly a safety measure involving you, your passengers, and others on the road.

Products that could make it dangerous to drive include

• Prescription drugs for anxiety
• Some antidepressants
• Products containing codeine
• Some cold remedies and allergy products
• Tranquilizers
• Sleeping pills
• Pain relievers
• Diet pills, "stay awake" drugs, and other medications with stimulants (e.g. caffeine, ephedrine, pseudoephedrine)

Responsibility

Products that contain stimulants may cause excitability or drowsiness. Also, never combine medication and alcohol while driving.
Medical marijuana and cigarette smoking are prohibited during training hours.

We may working with flammable or combustible materials nearby and smoking is therefore not allowed. Please limit alcohol content after hours.

There will be no buzzed or drunk driving during the course training dates. This is to ensure not only your safety and reputation but that of the program and other students as well as the host agency.

Operations should be similar to your general work duties and requirements. Reading the warning labels and paying attention to your body's response to medications will help you greatly. Training is a demanding requirement for professional development. There are a lot of external stressors that take place as well as mental focus required.

The more we know, the better we can go after our goals.

Thank you for your participation and understanding.

Reference
https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm107894.htm

_____________________

Posted: 10.27.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

JAPAN PROFESSIONAL BOAT OPERATOR TRAINING CENTER 2018

JAPAN PROFESSIONAL BOAT OPERATOR TRAINING CENTER

2018 JpBOT

This JPBOT seminar is a course to train small boat operators (Captains) who have acquired necessary knowledge and skills with a view to a safe and effective public use of small vessels, and the graduates are qualified in small boat operations. This is a seminar organized by JBPOT to certify as a professional (Professional Operator).

1. What is JPBOT?

JPBOT (Japan Professional Boat Operator Training Center) contributes to water safety and safe operations through the training of pilots who publicly use small vessels to develop water-saving rescue boats, and is aiming to prevent water- accidents.

(Partnership) It is a cooperative management organization by three organizations:
- Japan Marine Recreation Association (JMRA)
- Marine Sports Foundation (MARIS)
- Rescue Water Craft Association Japan (RWCAJ)

Thank you to Yamaha Motors Corporation on the JPBOT 1st training introduction in Hamamatsu.

2. Course Training

Small salvage pilot boat pilot • Awareness & basic level course (RWC: Rescue Water Craft)

(1) Stage 1: Awareness Level
① Attitude as captain
② Knowledge and skills required as pilots of small hydraulic rescue boat

(2) Stage 2: Basic level
① Handling of small boats required for pilots of small hydraulic rescue boat
② Small boat pilot boat pilot required for pilots

* This seminar will be subject to completion examination of department and practical skills to confirm knowledge · skill acquisition status when approving.

3. Date and time
2 days
(1) November 3 (Saturday): Stage - 1 8: 30 ~ 17: 00
(2) November 4 (Sun): Stage -2 9: 00 ~ 17: 00

4. Location
Shizuoka prefectural three-day youth house Shizuoka prefecture Hamamatsu city Kita-ku Tsuzuki Town Tsuzuki 523-1
Our facilities can accommodate meals • stay (shared room). We will inform you after applying.

5. Attendance qualification
· Be a holder of a water licensee's motorized driver's license
· Be over 18 years old

6. Amount of money
50,000 yen (tax included)

7. Payee
Mitsubishi UFJ Bank Shintomicho Branch Normal 0000837
Marine Sports Foundation of Public Interest Foundation

8. Application · Inquiries
Marine Sports Foundation of Public Interest Foundation
Officer: Yoshimura

TEL: 03-3454-1151 / FAX: 03-3454-1152
Application for attendance download
Please fill in the necessary information and send it to fax or email (information@maris.or.jp).

National Boat Education

当講習会は、小型船舶の安全で効果的な公的利用を目指し、必要となる知識と技術を修得した小型船舶操縦者(船長)を養成するコースであり、修了者を小型水難救助艇操縦士(プロフェッショナル•オペレーター)として認定する、JBPOTが実施する講習会です。
1. JPBOTとは?
JPBOT(Japan Professional Boat Operator Training center)は、公的に小型船舶を使用する水難救助艇操縦士の育成を通じて水上安全や安全運航に貢献し、水難•海難事故の防止を図る事を目的とした、(一財)日本海洋レジャー安全•振興協会、(一社)日本小型水難救助艇協会、(公財)マリンスポーツ財団の3団体連携による協同運営組織です。
2.コース・トレーニング
小型水難救助艇操縦士•アウェアネス&ベーシックレベルコース(RWC:水上オートバイ)
(1)ステージ1:アウェアネスレベル
①船長としての心構え
②小型水難救助艇操縦士として求められる知識及び技術
(2)ステージ2:ベーシックレベル
①小型水難救助艇操縦士に求められる小型船舶の取扱
②小型水難救助艇操縦士に求められる小型船舶の操縦
※当講習会は認定に際し、知識•技能の修得状況を確認する学科及び実技の修了審査を行います。
3.日時
2日間
(1)11月3日(土):ステージ-1  8:30~17:00
(2)11月4日(日):ステージ-2  9:00~17:00
4.場所
静岡県立三ヶ日青年の家 静岡県浜松市北区三ヶ日町都筑523−1
当施設は食事•宿泊(相部屋)が可能です。申込み後にご案内します。

5.受講資格
・水上オートバイの操縦免許資格保持者であること
・18歳以上であること
6.金額
5万円(税込)
7.お振込先
三菱UFJ銀行 新富町支店 普通0000837
公益財団法人マリンスポーツ財団
8.お申し込み•お問い合わせ
公益財団法人マリンスポーツ財団
担当:吉村
TEL:03-3454-1151/FAX:03-3454-1152
受講申込書ダウンロード
必要事項をご記入の上、FAXまたはメール(information@maris.or.jp)まで送信願います。

http://www.maris.or.jp/event/2712/?fbclid=IwAR1O98A7NYVl_HvBKvsm8xhyVKbAEYoDfVXUBfW6ba1GU53edKlMslx68fU

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Posted: 10.27.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

DEAD ZONE

Rescue Water Craft Dead Zone

The 'Dead Zone' is an area astern of the third seated position of the Rescue Water Craft (RWC). It incorporates the stern eye area, stern deck and the re-boarding handle and is referred to when using a TAD.

This area is one to observe for safety due to the range of motion between the Rescue Water Craft and the Towable Aquaplane Device (TAD-Rescue Board). This area is a location that we are aware of regarding a variety of movements and therefore have termed it the 'dead zone', meaning this is an area we try not to make physical contact with our hands and are mindful of body placement. It is a 'no go' area.

We utilize a developmental attitude of behavior regarding body placement on a TAD and try our best to minimize contact areas and hazards with a concerted awareness of possible strike zones, both from using a TAD and on board the RWC.

Be aware that not all operational situations will be possible to maintain efficiency in body placement or range of motion. These are best determined by the Coxswain training level, instructional content and familiarity with weather, vessel, TAD and not limited to being able to define the forces of action and range of motion and the objectives of training.

This requires of Coxswains and Crew members to have professional understanding and behavioral training regarding this risk area.

Items to consider during training with a TAD:

1. Type of RWC and TAD
2. Conditions of water and weather
3. Communications between Coxswain/Crew and training goals
4. Review, correction and counseling of supervisor and/or Coxswain/crew operations
5. Speed of the craft and turning radius applied with associated weight distribution on the TAD
6. TAD connectivity

It is impossible to cover everything we would normally prescribe in our training program for student candidates. We can give you some ideas to ponder and size up against common sense and water safety. Let's dig in!

Rescue Boards rest on the top transom stern deck and centerline connection point from the bow of the Towable Aquaplane
Device (TAD-Rescue Board) is typically affixed to the RWC stern eye.

We do not add any additional hardware to the upper RWC deck due to vessel and passenger safety. We would not advise
agencies or personnel to drill holes through the RWC hull and add additional bow eyes to the top deck. Especially if
working in flood environments or drawing bodies over these areas.

These could become strike points, facial contact, create entanglement or entrapment, wrap long hair (scalping) or garments and cause breaks/fractures/amputations of fingers if rings are worn.

Port and Starboard side rescue board tether points generally are affixed to the trailer tie down eye points underneath the RWC top deck bond line. The trailer tie down eyes are actually a very strong tow point, but rarely is there direct load on these two points. Generally there is a giveway or slack and shock effect depending upon the style of board, the interface of connectivity and the amount of weight pushing downward with gravitational force.

Rescue boards are not floating per se, they are dragging, pivoting, rising and lowering. They are a towable aquaplane device that rests semi forward on the stern deck of a Rescue Water Craft.

There is a pitch upward and downward at the fulcrum point of interface between the rescue board bottom deck. There is also interface of the bow tether point that can crease the topside of the rescue board if too much force is applied or if pinned against a fixed object or rolled such as in waves. Always touch check and visibly inspect your rescue board and retire when needed.

When in a training environment we coach our students as role players to understand the risks to bodily injury using a TAD such as placing their head when lying in a prone face down position to port or starboard astern of the craft and to monitor survivors body positioning or changing positions while underway.

When underway in the same fashion changes of body position will occur with the interface between water movement and Coxswain helms control and trim. There is not a lot of deck space however we have studied the most practical methods by observing RWC, board, water and human movements and have determined that the 'dead zone' is a clear reminder for personal safety.

It's easy to say and clear to remember. This is a non-operative area. No hands should be in this area between the board and the boat, these are pinch points due to the lifting up and downward motions between the two leverage points.

This takes some time for students to incorporate into their training skillsets, this does not happen as a behavior during their first rotation. It takes many reminders and self assessment to correct and enable the safety behaviors. These corrections can be mere inches and change while underway due to vessel movement or body positioning.

It is important to consider anchor points, handheld points, foot wedges (not entrapment) and the pivot or sway of the rescue board. This does not mean they are gaining any visual capabilities. This is a measure to protect the head from either lifting and rising, or dropping and striking the ‘Dead Zone’ area in case of mishap.

There are a lot of contributing factors. Video review of incorrect and correct methods may assist you in understanding the risks and determining what would be the best course of action with the make and model of RWC and board. This is a difficult discussion to harness without proper coaching, so do not use all of this as a set in stone way of operating. There are many contributing actions that apply, such as operator and crew knowledge, Rescue Board inspection, RWC inspection and a firm understanding of the waterway you will be training and working under. And then, add pressure of a real life situation.

This is also a safety consideration during transport of survivors. Another rule we would like you to consider along with the 'dead zone' is a safe speed transport set at about 25 miles per hour. There are many technical needs, so don't fixate on just one, we teach hundreds of variations that enable the operators to select their underway options.

Don't forget that wise saying 'where the head goes the body follows'.

Use Common Sense, Evaluate, Study, Learn and Correct

REVIEW YOUR PROGRAM USE

Let's recap:

1. Do not add hardware to the RWC top deck where bodies come in contact
2. Observe the Dead Zone area astern and be mindful of points of contact
3. Safe Speeds Underway (25 mph rule), crew communicates with Coxswain is speed is determined unsafe
4. Coxswains maintain a level, steady and stable RWC at all times, Crew maintains the efficiency use of survivor loading and
underway security and secures the final stop measures
5. Observe counterbalance measures between the RWC and TAD and Persons on Board (POB).

We spend a lot of focus time to work with rescue boards to gain understanding in simple physics, vessel/board type, water dynamics and operator technical abilities. We want our Coxswains and Crew to be 100% responsible for their underway actions. We believe this is possible with a strong mindset, knowledge base and policies that work for success of the mission.

The Dead Zone is a reminder that this area is not a safe zone for us, to respect our board and rescue board use, and we must be mindful of potential impact or strike zones when operating in dynamic conditions other than calm water.

Speed is a critical component of professional marine units, safe operations mean Safe Coxswains and Crew who maintain a safe and successful program!

There are typically three ways of operations for crew to consider and train under until familiarization occurs:

1. Laying prone face down on a TAD
2. Layering weight and body positions on a TAD (multiple persons on board)
3. Kneeling-bracing position on TAD as Crew
4. Sitting position on RWC stern seat

Please consider taking a class and find out what you do not know!

It's far less expensive than the long rough road of mishap review and repair.

We hope to see you in a class!

Posted: 10.27.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

TEN YEARS OF K38 JAPAN

K38 JAPAN LEGACY

K38 Japan legacy trains the next generation of Coxswains and Crew. They protect reputation. They care about their students and survivors coming home again safely.

K38 Japan Instructors have dedicated their professional experience towards the reputations of others, lifesaving and program development.

K38 Japan is a legacy company invested in the future, your future, your career.

The K38 Way of Training has been dedicated towards the greater good of society.

We understand that partnership is a way of being and that lifesaving begins with community, strength and standards.

K38 Japan Leads The Way

LEGACY OF LIFESAVING

K38 is a partner in global outreach to ensure that Operators, Coxswains, Crew and public safety agencies are protected and have the highest level of knowledge to conduct their marine units with pride, respect and integrity. We are committed to the public trust and the sacred trust of serving others in a time of need.

K38 Japan is one piece of this solution, we could not do this alone. We could not be a servant if we did not have outstanding partners in boating safety who care just as passionately about professionalism, and they do!

We thank your partners and public safety agencies, associations and companies who care and are united and working very hard in an united front to support one another. These are amazing teams, administrations and people who have heart. They have determination and stewardship and care about community and appreciate professionalism as a way of being and it shows.

Thank you to Marine Sports Foundation, Japan Coast Guard, Japan Ocean Leisure Safety and Promotion Association, Rescue Water Craft Association Japan, Japan Small Water Relief Boat Association, Japan Boating & Water Safety Summit, NASBLA, NSBC, Rescue Water Craft Association, all their instructors, partners and administrators for a concerted international effort of public service!

We at K38 love you all!

K38 Founder-Shawn Alladio

_____________________

Posted: 10.27.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

IDENTIFY YOUR WEAK OPERATORS

BECOME THE STRENGTH

Identify Your Weak Operators. Identify your role as team leader or administrator.

Strength and Weakness are reciprocal. Insert either word and we still discover the same framework of concern.

How much foundational knowledge do you possess to manage a Marine Unit?

What is an Marine Unit Administrator? What is a Coxswain? They are the Operator. They are the Captain. They are in charge of the Crew. They are in charge of the ship (Rescue Water Craft). It is important to identify your weak Coswains for a variety of reasons:

1. Reduction of liability through competence
2. Teaming (building a cohesive unit)
3. Safety at Sea
4. Operational Integrity
5. Mentoring
6. Operational Acumen

It is the precision of opposites we identify. We can easily state this is the same 6 criterion needs for a strong operator or crew!

LACK OF EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT

When you can identify the weakness in your Operators you have a distinct advantage to identify the complimentary strengths in your team. This is something that needs to be conducted periodically.

How can you make an assessment?

1. Review the condition of the Rescue Water Craft(s)
2. Review the condition of the trailering and Transport equipment
3. Quiz the Operators
4. Skillset assess monthly the technical ability of your team
5. Rate the level of competency and assign the rating in the database
6. Describe the shortcomings and capabilities, make improvement on both!
7. Assign degrees of performance related to service work

If you have an Operator that is identified as problematic in techincal skills, but is high in managing equipment, perhaps a reassignment is necessary? Where are their strengths? What are they comfortable doing? What are the uncomfortable doing?

Provide an honest counseling session regarding performance, executive and completion of all tasks. Ask them if they would be willing to take on another level and manage that specific area of the program. Correlate that with documentation that will verify their factual performance and related success or defaults.

It is important that an administrator oversees and inspects the performance of the team, leaders and program guidelines.

You may need an outside program assessor to partner with who is unbiased but willing to check deficiencies that could lead to a lawsuit, injury, death or program destruction. There is nothing wrong with this, but everything goes wrong when it's not in place and considered important.

K38 Jet Ski Training

STRENGTH

Strength is a needed ingredient in program management and sustainability, but how do we measure strength?

Is id conducted by setting a program and essentially abandoning it year after year because its always been that way or do we determine to investigate the program failures and success?

That begins with the personnel in charge. Whether administrators, operators, crew or mechanics the teaming aspect is critical for future safety as well as present safety and program sustainability.

Make a commitment right now to review your Rescue Water Craft program.

Interview your team.

Ask them what they think is working well and what areas they would like to see changes.

Be courageous and represent integrity, as you may be saving one of your team members reputation or your own.

Care About Your Team

EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP CARES ABOUT RESULTS

Conduct periodic program reviews. Inspect equipment. Look at mishap or injury reports. Get the entire team together and ask them to share with you their concerns. Do they have adequate budget? Do they have the right equipment? Is the service of the boats adequate? Do they believe their skills are competent?

Review other mishaps. Can you see your team in the video or storyline?

...Otherwise the door is open for a mishap.

Don't wait until you have to learn from a lesson.

Take the lessons now and make a plan. A solid plan.

People do not have to get hurt, Rescue Water Craft do not have to be damaged to learn a lessonM, nor reputations damaged.

Backing up and slowing down your program flow can save your department and your staff intense grief and discouragement.

Review your mishaps. The story is in the actions and the subsequent behaviors can be alerted.

Ask us how we know?

Good luck, we wish you a safe and noble program that you are proud of and your people are operating safely!

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Posted: 10.27.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

IDENTIFY YOUR STRONG OPERATORS

COXSWAINS

Identify Your Strong Coxswains.

What is a Coxswain? They are the Operator. They are the Captain. They are in charge of the Crew. They are in charge of the ship (Rescue Water Craft). It is important to identify your strong Coswains for a variety of reasons:

1. Reduction of liability through competence
2. Teaming (building a cohesive unit)
3. Safety at Sea
4. Operational Integrity
5. Mentoring
6. Operational Acumen

MANAGEMENT

When you can identify the strength in your Operators you have a distinct advantage to identify the complimentary deficiencies in your team. This is something that needs to be conducted periodically.

How can you make an assessment?

1. Review the condition of the Rescue Water Craft(s)
2. Review the condition of the trailering and Transport equipment
3. Quiz the Operators
4. Skillset assess monthly the technical ability of your team
5. Rate the level of competency and assign the rating in the database
6. Describe the shortcomings and capabilities, make improvement on both!
7. Assign degrees of performance related to service work

If you have an Operator that is identified as problematic in techincal skills, but is high in managing equipment, perhaps a reassignment is necessary? Where are their strengths? What are they comfortable doing? What are the uncomfortable doing?

Provide an honest counseling session regarding performance, executive and completion of all tasks. Ask them if they would be willing to take on another level and manage that specific area of the program. Correlate that with documentation that will verify their factual performance and related success or defaults.

It is important that an administrator oversees and inspects the performance of the team, leaders and program guidelines.

K38 Jet Ski Training

STRENGTH

Strength is a needed ingredient in program management and sustainability, but how do we measure strength?

Is id conducted by setting a program and essentially abandoning it year after year because its always been that way or do we determine to investigate the program failures and success?

That begins with the personnel in charge. Whether administrators, operators, crew or mechanics the teaming aspect is critical for future safety as well as present safety and program sustainability.

Make a commitment right now to review your Rescue Water Craft program.

Interview your team.

Ask them what they think is working well and what areas they would like to see changes.

Be courageous and represent integrity, as you may be saving one of your team members reputation or your own.

Care About Your Team

PROGRESS IS EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP

...Otherwise the door is open for a mishap.

Don't wait until you have to learn from a lesson.

Take the lessons now and make a plan. A solid plan.

People do not have to get hurt, Rescue Water Craft do not have to be damaged to learn a lesson.

Today there are service providers such as K38 who have gone through the scale of difficulty and formatted procedures that
protect reputation, reduce risk of injury and accident and are on the frontline of knowledge.

If you do not have a subject matter expert on your staff who is invested in the Rescue Water Craft community and can represent 100 questions that are accurate about a Rescue Water Craft, 200 questions about the environment and 500 questions about how this lines up accidents, you may need to reach out and have your program reviewed.

Backing up and slowing down your program flow can save your department and your staff intense grief and discouragement.

Review your mishaps. The story is in the actions and the subsequent behaviors can be alerted.

Ask us how we know?

Good luck, we wish you a safe and noble program that you are proud of and your people are operating safely!

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Posted: 10.27.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

PROTECT YOUR HELM

DON'T DO THIS

Helm Safety is Security Underway.

I would advise all of Rescue Water Craft crews, teams and operators to never strap anything down on top of the Rescue Water Craft handlebars (helm) that places direct and consistent pressure against the helm station.

Rescue Water Craft helms do not have the structural strength in storage or transport to maintain a weight load placed up against them, let alone any ratchet cargo straps pressing down.

Disregarding the structural strength of the helm and over bearing a significant weight load against it could lead to a catastrophic failure of the helm.

Resulting in a serious mishap, injury or fatality.

Also to note that the rear stern re-boarding handle is also plastic and can suffer damage as well.

A rule of thumb? If you capsize your Rescue Water Craft and it heels over upside down in shallow waters, when you right it, check the re-boarding handle, rear seats and helm, forward cowling, turn the helm and pull back throttle and inspect the steering nozzle before you start the craft.

This typically happens because of a lack of education regarding the care and maintenance of the overall craft itself. A simple solution would be to have every member of your team read the Owner's Manual warnings and cautions of the Make, Model and Year of Production of your Rescue Water Craft.

Sheared off Helm

KNOW YOUR BOAT

Not all of the steering column necks are not metal fabrication unless you have an afermarket one designed for race builds. Construction can be a combination plastic and metal and both can receive stress fractures from objects that produce repetitive movement, such as air pushing against an IRB and creating a bounce affect with a downward force towards the Rescue Water Craft.

This could also be caused by a poorly maintained trailer where the trailer bunks are failing or the axle, tires and wheels are overloaded with more weight than their rating or the tongue weight is incorrect.

1. Protect the helm
2. Protect the handlebar grips to not cause rotation which can result in wrist flexion
3. Protect the throttle lever and clutch lever (port/starboard helm sides)

The only way you can inspect the helm after a transport such as this showed in the header photo is to remove the shroud and inspect the entire steering assembly closely and even then, maybe not.

First care is to protect the helm and the water jet pump because of their relationship values, inspect your throttle lever and don't allow any lines near it, that could be a fatal mistake.

You don't want to be underway and have your helm shear off when hand hold forces are applied and it let's go, loss of steerage and stopping distance to fixed objects or other crews cannot be controlled at this point, and the operator and or crew could be ejected.

This could become a serious situation if ignored due to not understanding the craft, not knowing its construction design and not having enough storage for ancillary gear.

Remember, you are a mariner, not a rescuer!

Don't get it backwards! Repeat after me: I am a mariner.

Know your boat as a prudent mariner and care for them as you care for yourself; rescue is an application of our maritime community. It is one facet of operations. If you consider yourself a rescuer first you are going to experience many mishaps and chronic failures of your Rescue Water Craft Program.

Recommendation: Deflate the hypalon tubes for the IRB and set your gear up on site instead, don't compromise your boats. Don't strap anything above the helm station. Take a RWC maintenance course, check ours out!

Ask me how I know? lol

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Posted: 9.14.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

KIDDE FIRE EXTINGUISHER RECALL

RECALL

Back in late 2017 a Kidde fire extinguisher recall notice was sent throughout our Marine community. However we have noticed many of our colleagues are not using fire extinguishers in their Rescue Water Craft. We are required by law to carry on board the proper fire extinguisher. Since the recall, there has been confusion on what type will fit in the secure areas onboard Rescue Water Craft. Sharing with you the fire extinguishers we are using on our K38 Kawasaki Ultra LX Jet Skis. Please read this article and make sure you replace yours if you did not get the notice!

November 2, 2017 - In conjunction with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), Kidde announced a recall to replace certain Kidde fire extinguishers. The replacement program was initiated because certain fire extinguishers can become clogged or require excessive force to activate, posing a risk of failure to discharge. In addition, the nozzle can detach with enough force to pose an impact hazard. The product recall involves two styles of Kidde disposable fire extinguishers: plastic handle fire extinguishers and plastic push-button fire extinguishers.

At Kidde, the safety of our customers is our priority. We have identified a potential product safety issue related to certain fire extinguishers.

As a result, Kidde is voluntarily recalling these extinguishers. This guide will help you identify whether your fire extinguisher is included in the recall, and show you where to find the information needed to process your request for a free replacement.

Affected Fire Extinguishers with Plastic Handles
There are two styles of fire extinguishers included in the recall: certain plastic handle fire extinguishers and push-button Pindicator fire extinguishers.

If the extinguisher has a gauge, the first thing to look for is a vertically oriented pull pin that is either fixed with two connections or hanging with a single connection.

Push-Button Pindicator Fire Extinguishers
The other type of affected extinguisher is the push-button Pindicator design. These extinguishers have push buttons, and a T-shaped pull pin and a loop handle. These units come in two sizes and are either red or white.

First Alert Marine Compact Fire Extinguisher 5-B:C

REPLACE

Note to Personal Watercraft Owners
If your push-button Pindicator model is used with a personal watercraft, Kidde does not currently have an exact replacement for it, but will provide a replacement that is U.S. Coast Guard rated, and similar in size. While it may not fit in the same location as the extinguisher that you currently have, there may be another space on your watercraft where the extinguisher can be stored or mounted.

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE KIDDE REPLACEMENT MANY NOT FIT IN EXISTING PERSONAL WATERCRAFT COMPARTMENTS, WE DO HOWEVER HAVE A LIMITED QUANTITY OF EXACT FIT REPLACEMENTS AVAILABLE IN OUR SERVICE DEPARTMENT. GIVE US A CALL TODAY (231) 220-2128 FOR DETAILS ON THE REPLACEMENT.

Non-Affected Fire Extinguishers with Metal Handles
If your extinguisher has a metal handle and metal pull pin – in any style – it is not affected.

Non-Affected Fire Extinguishers with Plastic Handles
Plastic handle extinguishers with horizontal plastic pull pins and a curved black plastic handle are also not affected.

These units come in various sizes and are either red, white or silver and can be ABC or BC rated but the important thing to remember is the horizontal plastic pull pin and curved black plastic handle.

For more information about how to determine if your extinguisher is affected:

Recall Video

Affected models

We have Four Kawasaki Ultra LX 2017 Jet Ski models currently. These are the fire extinguishers we recommend.
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Posted: 8.31. 2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.