RESCUE DRAMA

WATER RESCUE DRAMA

Every time we train, we are exposed to complexities by the dynamics of nature and our human framework. This is to increase from the insufficiencies of the last complex learning objective.

 Danger
 Risk
 Behavior

SACRIFICE

Or you can sacrifice your reputation, equipment and well being by regressing to not participating in effective training:

 Closed mind
 Restrictive to danger and its remedial necessary corrections
 Endorsing tragedy in service

RESPONSIBLE PEOPLE ARE GREATLY ADMIRED

How can you increase functionality through service and reduce drama?

1. Research your program need, make a list and check the boxes
2. Source multiple outlets
3. Connect with the boating community and disconnect with lifesaving, you are a boater first!
4. Use your RWC Owner’s Manual
5. Secure an appropriate budget that tracks all program demands
6. Train with credited instructors. Ask them for their boating credentials.
7. Evaluate and track your in-service instructors, are they current in knowledgeable of boat operations?
8. Track your mishaps, do not repeat history

These eight items will assist your department Rescue Water Craft Program to get on target and stay on track!

______________________
Posted: April 15, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

SAVE NOW PAY LATER

You can save now but you sure will pay later!

When an agency representative says they cannot afford training or the right equipment, they need to shut their program down and reevaluate their present reality.

It's time to get honest and shoot straight from the hip.

There is no way to cry about not having a program functional.

But you can close a program that is not functional and will cause damage, such as a mishap.

BLACK HOLE

The Black Hole of wrong is an excuse.

What do I mean by that? If you have equipment you cannot maintain financially, you don't have a program.

If you cannot afford to pay for training that will stop an accident from occurring, prevent the injury or death of personnel, you better have a good insurance policy and be ready to ruin reptuation.

You can pay up front and do it right.

Or you can pay with silent ignorance that is going to ruin everything the program justified on paper but could not produce.

MANAGE PROBLEMS

If you decide by committee rule to close a program down, you have my respect.
If you decide by committee rule to discover opportunities to manage your program and restructure it, you have my respect.

Don't go ahead blindly. Break it down!

1. Equipment costs
2. PPE costs
3. Training Costs per member
4. Maintenance costs
5. Accident investigation costs
6. Injury costs
7. Replacement costs
8. Recurring training costs
9. Dispose of equipment costs
10. Administration costs
11. Annual evaluation costs of program
12. Mission deployment costs and loss
12. What else did we miss?

Your program is no different than how we run a business. If we open up the door and cut costs, something will go away for that decision. Which of the 12 items are you willing to remove?

Okay.. what will you get in exchange for that removal?

Don't forget to add in the storage fees you would pay for gear, buildings are not cheap. Add electricity, fuel and vehicles and trailers.

Don't forget tires, maintenance and checkups.

Keep going... you are starting to get the picture!

Save now or pay later... having a maritime boat unit is costly.

It is NOT a tool in the toolbox! Stop saying that crap~ It's a marine unit with many pieces that are interwoven for it to be provided. Its hundreds of tools united in one forward motion.

__________

Posted 1.19.2019

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

READY?

Ready? Three Questions we all need to ask ourselves before we splash our Rescue Water Craft!

1. Is your Rescue Water Craft Ready?

2. Is your Crew Personal Protective Equipment Ready?

3. Does your Crew have the proper training experience to fulfill the mission safely?

KITTED

REPEAT

By asking ourselves these three questions we can determine if we are 'ready to go' or 'no go'.

Having a maritime asset such as a Rescue Water Craft requires your safety plan to be a determination of mission success.

Sit down now and plot our these three questions and get together with your team.

Discuss where your program is and if you can response adequately.

Are your personnel able to have appropriate tools and personal protection?

Do you know how long it takes to launch? Put those three together and do a dry run, time it!

GO!

__________

Posted 1.16.2019

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

TRANSFORM POTENTIAL MISHAPS TO RELIABLE OPERATIONS

Transform potential mishaps to reliable operations by focusing on your factual goals and program needs.

No agency needs to learn from a mishap. Accident prevention is a reliable management policy. Our first goal is to prevent them from happening by possessing the fundamental knowledge base of boating safety.

Oftentimes programs are set up to fail due to a poorly aligned budget, but this may only be one element of the problem.

Sometimes the failures are from a lack of procedures that are enforced or training modules that are not helpful to the goals.

There is a lot of responsibility to manage a maritime boating unit. For Rescue Water Craft that responsibility is exceptionally high due to the nature of calls these unique small power boats will be employed.

UPGRADE

Training does not have to be emphasized as 'on-water' a lot of updates can be done by review of material.

I spend a lot of time emphasizing annual upgrades! Stay current and understand any changes to boating laws or rules in your area.

Update your team with quizzes that keep them primed for boating safety when not on the water, such as knowing the ATONS. Aids to Navigation for both coastal or inland waterways.

When you conduct training assessments on the water, be sure to correct any mistakes and be constantly vigilant as the scrutineer of safe boating practices.

A maritime background in boating is a legacy heritage to protect so that the new water rescue community understands first hand this is not rescue, its boating handling! There is a significant difference and that is lost in translation.

Emphasize: BOATING

MANAGE

Have monthly review meetings regarding your program. If you program is only seasonally prepare a management policy for weekly updates to review any mishaps.

Why? We are seeing an increase in mishaps and we should be witnessing a decrease in these areas of operations. It's because of the rollover in agency personnel, not properly training up the next Coxswain generation, not having proper documentation to transfer or its outdated and incorrect.

The good news is these are very easy solutions to tackle.

__________

Posted 1.7.2019

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

MAYBE YOU ARE NOT TRYING HARD ENOUGH

Maybe you are not trying hard enough? Effort needs evaluation. Evaluation needs honesty.

Have you put together your operational metrics?

Do you know what goals you need to achieve? How are you going to sustain those and translate them into operational maintenance? Well one way is to try harder but in another direction, such as maintenance review of your Rescue Water Craft program.

Perhaps you may need to review your vetting process for team members? Can you conduct remedial updates for the vetting process and items needed to ensure safety of personnel and competency? Yes you can and you should!

RETURNS NOT DEFICITS

Returns not deficits mean your program is healthy.

This means your management process is functional. But if it isn't and you need to take on remedial action, its not difficult to increase your capability.

The good news is you can do this anytime but its preferable to have an annual review process in place.

REVIEW

Editing program management needs to be an annual process that begins in the last month of the year. You can easily construct a review program by looking at all your response records and any mishaps that occurred during that time or recurring mechanical issues with your Rescue Water Craft.

One area that you can make improvements on is your skills assessment.

If you do not have an update to this in the past year here are some suggestions for your consideration. Pick one simple repetitive behavior you rely upon and break it down into a skillset for qualification updates.

Trailering and On-Water Performance

Most damage that happens to a Rescue Water Craft is from poor trailering habits. Don't allow your Coxswains to turn off the Rescue Water Craft ignition before the Rescue Water Craft bow touches the trailer bunk runners.

Failure to do so will permit the Rescue Water Craft to drift off target and strike either the metal rails or bend the bunk runners. The Rescue Water Craft needs to maintain its forward movement onto the trailer bunks until the centered hull loads up onto the bunks.

It is incorrect to use thrust that would disrupt the surrounding water area with reverse use due to how the fluid dynamics are distributed this could disrupt other such as at a boat launch, create unnecessary boat handling and or off center from over correction.

Practice
Trailering -backing up, launching RWC's, loading RWC's, tie downs to RWC/Trailer (5 checked off in a row with remedial corrections and notations on skill checklist per team member.

Ensure that your team members know how to use the trailer tie downs and that they understand a soft approach to the helm/throttle management in confined areas of use.

Emphasize the depth of water to protect the water jet pump.

Make sure that the bow of the Rescue Water Craft is secure on the trailer before launching and hauling out of the water.

Each rotation have them conduct a pre-check on the boat ramp with the bilge plugs properly inserted each time. Too many Coxswains are unfamiliar with their craft features and oftentimes over tighten the bilge plugs.

This is a good example of one skillset. You can create as many as are needed and unique to your area of operation and the make model and year of your craft.

Thanks for reading this article, and for caring about your reputation and those you work with. Let us know if you have any topics you would like covered in future articles.
__________

Posted 1.7.2019

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

Act Courageously Through Competence

Let Us Begin

Courage is a distinct action of human fortitude and opportunity. Competence is a scale of capability and commitment through scrutiny that enforces developmental aptitude.

Now, let's insert or most favorite Rescue Water Craft.

We have all the ingredients of success before us.

Decisions are Made Before Deployment

Actions can be either to variables:

1. Noble

2. Disaster

Which would you prefer? Sometimes a disaster prompts us to reach out for the noble humility of recognizing where our program is failing.

Then it gets easy!

What does training provide you? Either a waste of time, funding and resource or increase of capability, safety and prestige.

Prestige because you know you are on the right track and no longer fumbling the ball in the rescue lane. This was due to volition in leadership. Recognizing our pitfalls is the first step in striving for excellence through service.

Safety is a Behavior

I would like nothing better than for you to have the personal courage and conviction to evaluate where you are at the end of 2018.

1. What went wrong?
2. How did it happen?
3. What are the contributors of these failures?
4. Where can you make courageous changes?
5. Will you do it?

I want to encourage you to evaluate, assess and to be very hard on your recognition of alarm. Have your program assessed by an outside entity. Review your mishaps. Be critical in your assessments, don't say 'good job', say what can we do better?

Competence is Courage, it is a difficult transition from one to the other, because it is earned by effort.

I believe in you or you wouldn't be here spending your precious time reading this. You are going to do great!

Start the new year out with an honest assessment and your program will soar!

Thank you for being a part of our maritime community.

_________________
Posted 12.22.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

Public Safety Law Loan Program

Yamaha or Kawasaki ‘Law Loan Program’

Yamaha or Kawasaki ‘Law Loan Program’

This program was set up through the efforts of the PWIA (Personal Water Craft Industry Association) in partnership with the manufacturers.

This is NOT a mandatory program for dealerships, it is voluntary and up to the discretion of the participating dealership based off of past positive or negative experiences with public safety agencies or a willingness to serve the community with quality resources.

You can go to the following websites to start the investigative process:

1. Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA
Kawasaki Dealer Locator

2. Yamaha Motors Corporation USA
Yamaha Dealer Locator

Kawasaki JET SKI STX 15-F

Participating Dealerships

Locate the nearest dealerships in your region. You will be looking at a 3-seater Personal Water Craft (PWC). Prepare a list of questions to ask the dealer representative.

Some public safety agencies also request for additional assets, however we are only going to discuss the Rescue Water Craft (RWC) which is the occupational term for our type of maritime asset, known as Personal Water Craft recreationally.

1. Yamaha-WaveRunner®

2. Kawasaki-JET SKI® (Ultra LX or STX 15-F)

Be prepared to conduct investigative work!

Make a list and keep notes on your contact progress.

Or you can purchase a 2019 Ultra JET SKI® ULTRA® LX MSRP $11,199. Sometimes this is a good option after you work with the
Law Loan program.

The Law Loan Program has been going strong for several decades!

Public Safety Agency Responsibilities

Make contact with the dealer leadership and ask if they participate on the “Law Loan Program’ for public safety agencies.

3. Write a Letter of request on agency letterhead and submit back to the participating dealership.
What you may be responsible for:

• Provide a Personal Water Craft trailer that is rated to transport a 1,000 lb. craft at 11.6” inches in length. (No shorty trailers, must be a properly sized trailer for the length/weight of the craft)
• Pay for any damages during the loan period
• Remove any agency stickers (do not remove manufacturer stickers) upon return
• Insure the water vehicle
• Professional certification for Coxswains and Crew operating the RWC (Rescue Water Craft)
• Rescue boards and accessories are not included. Rescue Boards may also damage the stern deck of a RWC so be prepared to compensate for any friction damages.
• Do not drill any holes or add any hardware to the craft during loan, do not alter the craft.
• Abide by the maintenance schedule and pay for the needed maintenance such as required hourly inspections and oil changes.


Yamaha WaveRunner VX Cruiser HO can be purchased for $11,499.00

Make sure you have prepared an effective annual budget for the following:
1. Maintenance Schedule
2. Hourly Maintenance Schedule
3. Training
4. Personal Protective Equipment for Personnel
5. Accessory devices (rescue board, tow lines, fuel cans, etc.)
6. Return damage fees acquired during the loan period
7. Fuel & Fuel conditioner for prevention of damages from the effects of Ethanol
8. Transportation: Trailer, Vehicle, tow hitches, electrical, tires and tie downs

Participating dealerships will need to sell the water vehicle when the loan program is over. These participating dealerships are for profit businesses and need to turn over the floor stock inventory. Be sure that you return the Personal Water Craft that you have conducted a thorough review of the craft.

I would advise you to do the following:

1. When you receive the water vehicle take photos of the top, bottom, port/starboard and interior of the craft.
2. When you are ready to prepare the craft for return prior to removing decals/stickers take the same round of photos.
3. When returning the water craft take the final third round of the photos for records.

Make sure that you ask in advance what fees you will incur for the maintenance of the craft and how long the dealership will have the asset for these repairs or schedules so you can adjust your operations in the field when you take the unit(s) out of service.

Keep detailed records of your training and maintenance, focusing on the engine hours in your daily checklists.

Make sure that every team member reads the Owner’s Manual and understands the content and is able to translate it effectively and surely.

Good luck in your search! We hope you find a matching dealer who is willing to support and has the appropriate resources to do so.

This is a wonderful program started by (ret.) Roger Hagie’s Public Relations guru from Kawasaki, he is a great friend, a Wake of Fame Inductee and a champion for public safety and lifesaving!

_______________________________

Posted 11.2.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

DEAD ZONE

Rescue Water Craft Dead Zone

The 'Dead Zone' is an area astern of the third seated position of the Rescue Water Craft (RWC). It incorporates the stern eye area, stern deck and the re-boarding handle and is referred to when using a TAD.

This area is one to observe for safety due to the range of motion between the Rescue Water Craft and the Towable Aquaplane Device (TAD-Rescue Board). This area is a location that we are aware of regarding a variety of movements and therefore have termed it the 'dead zone', meaning this is an area we try not to make physical contact with our hands and are mindful of body placement. It is a 'no go' area.

We utilize a developmental attitude of behavior regarding body placement on a TAD and try our best to minimize contact areas and hazards with a concerted awareness of possible strike zones, both from using a TAD and on board the RWC.

Be aware that not all operational situations will be possible to maintain efficiency in body placement or range of motion. These are best determined by the Coxswain training level, instructional content and familiarity with weather, vessel, TAD and not limited to being able to define the forces of action and range of motion and the objectives of training.

This requires of Coxswains and Crew members to have professional understanding and behavioral training regarding this risk area.

Items to consider during training with a TAD:

1. Type of RWC and TAD
2. Conditions of water and weather
3. Communications between Coxswain/Crew and training goals
4. Review, correction and counseling of supervisor and/or Coxswain/crew operations
5. Speed of the craft and turning radius applied with associated weight distribution on the TAD
6. TAD connectivity

It is impossible to cover everything we would normally prescribe in our training program for student candidates. We can give you some ideas to ponder and size up against common sense and water safety. Let's dig in!

Rescue Boards rest on the top transom stern deck and centerline connection point from the bow of the Towable Aquaplane
Device (TAD-Rescue Board) is typically affixed to the RWC stern eye.

We do not add any additional hardware to the upper RWC deck due to vessel and passenger safety. We would not advise
agencies or personnel to drill holes through the RWC hull and add additional bow eyes to the top deck. Especially if
working in flood environments or drawing bodies over these areas.

These could become strike points, facial contact, create entanglement or entrapment, wrap long hair (scalping) or garments and cause breaks/fractures/amputations of fingers if rings are worn.

Port and Starboard side rescue board tether points generally are affixed to the trailer tie down eye points underneath the RWC top deck bond line. The trailer tie down eyes are actually a very strong tow point, but rarely is there direct load on these two points. Generally there is a giveway or slack and shock effect depending upon the style of board, the interface of connectivity and the amount of weight pushing downward with gravitational force.

Rescue boards are not floating per se, they are dragging, pivoting, rising and lowering. They are a towable aquaplane device that rests semi forward on the stern deck of a Rescue Water Craft.

There is a pitch upward and downward at the fulcrum point of interface between the rescue board bottom deck. There is also interface of the bow tether point that can crease the topside of the rescue board if too much force is applied or if pinned against a fixed object or rolled such as in waves. Always touch check and visibly inspect your rescue board and retire when needed.

When in a training environment we coach our students as role players to understand the risks to bodily injury using a TAD such as placing their head when lying in a prone face down position to port or starboard astern of the craft and to monitor survivors body positioning or changing positions while underway.

When underway in the same fashion changes of body position will occur with the interface between water movement and Coxswain helms control and trim. There is not a lot of deck space however we have studied the most practical methods by observing RWC, board, water and human movements and have determined that the 'dead zone' is a clear reminder for personal safety.

It's easy to say and clear to remember. This is a non-operative area. No hands should be in this area between the board and the boat, these are pinch points due to the lifting up and downward motions between the two leverage points.

This takes some time for students to incorporate into their training skillsets, this does not happen as a behavior during their first rotation. It takes many reminders and self assessment to correct and enable the safety behaviors. These corrections can be mere inches and change while underway due to vessel movement or body positioning.

It is important to consider anchor points, handheld points, foot wedges (not entrapment) and the pivot or sway of the rescue board. This does not mean they are gaining any visual capabilities. This is a measure to protect the head from either lifting and rising, or dropping and striking the ‘Dead Zone’ area in case of mishap.

There are a lot of contributing factors. Video review of incorrect and correct methods may assist you in understanding the risks and determining what would be the best course of action with the make and model of RWC and board. This is a difficult discussion to harness without proper coaching, so do not use all of this as a set in stone way of operating. There are many contributing actions that apply, such as operator and crew knowledge, Rescue Board inspection, RWC inspection and a firm understanding of the waterway you will be training and working under. And then, add pressure of a real life situation.

This is also a safety consideration during transport of survivors. Another rule we would like you to consider along with the 'dead zone' is a safe speed transport set at about 25 miles per hour. There are many technical needs, so don't fixate on just one, we teach hundreds of variations that enable the operators to select their underway options.

Don't forget that wise saying 'where the head goes the body follows'.

Use Common Sense, Evaluate, Study, Learn and Correct

REVIEW YOUR PROGRAM USE

Let's recap:

1. Do not add hardware to the RWC top deck where bodies come in contact
2. Observe the Dead Zone area astern and be mindful of points of contact
3. Safe Speeds Underway (25 mph rule), crew communicates with Coxswain is speed is determined unsafe
4. Coxswains maintain a level, steady and stable RWC at all times, Crew maintains the efficiency use of survivor loading and
underway security and secures the final stop measures
5. Observe counterbalance measures between the RWC and TAD and Persons on Board (POB).

We spend a lot of focus time to work with rescue boards to gain understanding in simple physics, vessel/board type, water dynamics and operator technical abilities. We want our Coxswains and Crew to be 100% responsible for their underway actions. We believe this is possible with a strong mindset, knowledge base and policies that work for success of the mission.

The Dead Zone is a reminder that this area is not a safe zone for us, to respect our board and rescue board use, and we must be mindful of potential impact or strike zones when operating in dynamic conditions other than calm water.

Speed is a critical component of professional marine units, safe operations mean Safe Coxswains and Crew who maintain a safe and successful program!

There are typically three ways of operations for crew to consider and train under until familiarization occurs:

1. Laying prone face down on a TAD
2. Layering weight and body positions on a TAD (multiple persons on board)
3. Kneeling-bracing position on TAD as Crew
4. Sitting position on RWC stern seat

Please consider taking a class and find out what you do not know!

It's far less expensive than the long rough road of mishap review and repair.

We hope to see you in a class!

Posted: 10.27.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

IDENTIFY YOUR WEAK OPERATORS

BECOME THE STRENGTH

Identify Your Weak Operators. Identify your role as team leader or administrator.

Strength and Weakness are reciprocal. Insert either word and we still discover the same framework of concern.

How much foundational knowledge do you possess to manage a Marine Unit?

What is an Marine Unit Administrator? What is a Coxswain? They are the Operator. They are the Captain. They are in charge of the Crew. They are in charge of the ship (Rescue Water Craft). It is important to identify your weak Coswains for a variety of reasons:

1. Reduction of liability through competence
2. Teaming (building a cohesive unit)
3. Safety at Sea
4. Operational Integrity
5. Mentoring
6. Operational Acumen

It is the precision of opposites we identify. We can easily state this is the same 6 criterion needs for a strong operator or crew!

LACK OF EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT

When you can identify the weakness in your Operators you have a distinct advantage to identify the complimentary strengths in your team. This is something that needs to be conducted periodically.

How can you make an assessment?

1. Review the condition of the Rescue Water Craft(s)
2. Review the condition of the trailering and Transport equipment
3. Quiz the Operators
4. Skillset assess monthly the technical ability of your team
5. Rate the level of competency and assign the rating in the database
6. Describe the shortcomings and capabilities, make improvement on both!
7. Assign degrees of performance related to service work

If you have an Operator that is identified as problematic in techincal skills, but is high in managing equipment, perhaps a reassignment is necessary? Where are their strengths? What are they comfortable doing? What are the uncomfortable doing?

Provide an honest counseling session regarding performance, executive and completion of all tasks. Ask them if they would be willing to take on another level and manage that specific area of the program. Correlate that with documentation that will verify their factual performance and related success or defaults.

It is important that an administrator oversees and inspects the performance of the team, leaders and program guidelines.

You may need an outside program assessor to partner with who is unbiased but willing to check deficiencies that could lead to a lawsuit, injury, death or program destruction. There is nothing wrong with this, but everything goes wrong when it's not in place and considered important.

K38 Jet Ski Training

STRENGTH

Strength is a needed ingredient in program management and sustainability, but how do we measure strength?

Is id conducted by setting a program and essentially abandoning it year after year because its always been that way or do we determine to investigate the program failures and success?

That begins with the personnel in charge. Whether administrators, operators, crew or mechanics the teaming aspect is critical for future safety as well as present safety and program sustainability.

Make a commitment right now to review your Rescue Water Craft program.

Interview your team.

Ask them what they think is working well and what areas they would like to see changes.

Be courageous and represent integrity, as you may be saving one of your team members reputation or your own.

Care About Your Team

EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP CARES ABOUT RESULTS

Conduct periodic program reviews. Inspect equipment. Look at mishap or injury reports. Get the entire team together and ask them to share with you their concerns. Do they have adequate budget? Do they have the right equipment? Is the service of the boats adequate? Do they believe their skills are competent?

Review other mishaps. Can you see your team in the video or storyline?

...Otherwise the door is open for a mishap.

Don't wait until you have to learn from a lesson.

Take the lessons now and make a plan. A solid plan.

People do not have to get hurt, Rescue Water Craft do not have to be damaged to learn a lessonM, nor reputations damaged.

Backing up and slowing down your program flow can save your department and your staff intense grief and discouragement.

Review your mishaps. The story is in the actions and the subsequent behaviors can be alerted.

Ask us how we know?

Good luck, we wish you a safe and noble program that you are proud of and your people are operating safely!

_______________________________
Posted: 10.27.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

IDENTIFY YOUR STRONG OPERATORS

COXSWAINS

Identify Your Strong Coxswains.

What is a Coxswain? They are the Operator. They are the Captain. They are in charge of the Crew. They are in charge of the ship (Rescue Water Craft). It is important to identify your strong Coswains for a variety of reasons:

1. Reduction of liability through competence
2. Teaming (building a cohesive unit)
3. Safety at Sea
4. Operational Integrity
5. Mentoring
6. Operational Acumen

MANAGEMENT

When you can identify the strength in your Operators you have a distinct advantage to identify the complimentary deficiencies in your team. This is something that needs to be conducted periodically.

How can you make an assessment?

1. Review the condition of the Rescue Water Craft(s)
2. Review the condition of the trailering and Transport equipment
3. Quiz the Operators
4. Skillset assess monthly the technical ability of your team
5. Rate the level of competency and assign the rating in the database
6. Describe the shortcomings and capabilities, make improvement on both!
7. Assign degrees of performance related to service work

If you have an Operator that is identified as problematic in techincal skills, but is high in managing equipment, perhaps a reassignment is necessary? Where are their strengths? What are they comfortable doing? What are the uncomfortable doing?

Provide an honest counseling session regarding performance, executive and completion of all tasks. Ask them if they would be willing to take on another level and manage that specific area of the program. Correlate that with documentation that will verify their factual performance and related success or defaults.

It is important that an administrator oversees and inspects the performance of the team, leaders and program guidelines.

K38 Jet Ski Training

STRENGTH

Strength is a needed ingredient in program management and sustainability, but how do we measure strength?

Is id conducted by setting a program and essentially abandoning it year after year because its always been that way or do we determine to investigate the program failures and success?

That begins with the personnel in charge. Whether administrators, operators, crew or mechanics the teaming aspect is critical for future safety as well as present safety and program sustainability.

Make a commitment right now to review your Rescue Water Craft program.

Interview your team.

Ask them what they think is working well and what areas they would like to see changes.

Be courageous and represent integrity, as you may be saving one of your team members reputation or your own.

Care About Your Team

PROGRESS IS EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP

...Otherwise the door is open for a mishap.

Don't wait until you have to learn from a lesson.

Take the lessons now and make a plan. A solid plan.

People do not have to get hurt, Rescue Water Craft do not have to be damaged to learn a lesson.

Today there are service providers such as K38 who have gone through the scale of difficulty and formatted procedures that
protect reputation, reduce risk of injury and accident and are on the frontline of knowledge.

If you do not have a subject matter expert on your staff who is invested in the Rescue Water Craft community and can represent 100 questions that are accurate about a Rescue Water Craft, 200 questions about the environment and 500 questions about how this lines up accidents, you may need to reach out and have your program reviewed.

Backing up and slowing down your program flow can save your department and your staff intense grief and discouragement.

Review your mishaps. The story is in the actions and the subsequent behaviors can be alerted.

Ask us how we know?

Good luck, we wish you a safe and noble program that you are proud of and your people are operating safely!

_______________________________
Posted: 10.27.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.