SACRIFICE

INFLUENTIAL

Some Rescue Water Craft instructors are privileged due to their own self conceived status and these positions may not be favored by the team who knows they don’t have the right to question the hierarchy.

What makes instructors mature is the necessity of the goal, not protecting a kingdom of wrong.

Service as an instructor is a responsibility in saving lives, its a significant burden to bear.

WE ARE BOATERS NOT LIFESAVERS

We are a power boating community, we are to protect, I say protect and defend ‘Seamanship Skills’.

We do not see hardly any Rescue Water Craft instructors worldwide who get this, they may have lifesaving or fire training, but this does not make them a mariner nor a boating safety instructor.

In fact, this may actually make them dangerous.

Training in the maritime community is not lifesaving. Its boating education. Lifesaving is only one function of boat operations.

This is where the fire service and lifesaving services fail our maritime community. They do not separate the two and therefore they undercut the need for seamanship skills. They are essentially killing our maritime community with this mindset.

Social media and news outlet videos do not lie.

In fact, we cringe when we see the potential of risk they endorse without comprehending its negligent or has great potential to cause harm both to their reputation and survivors.

BOATING SAFETY CULTURE

Law Enforcement and the military get it, why? Because they have Marine Units!

They are vested in our boating culture and community and boating law is scripted around the personification of their use for public service and protection.

Most of our trauma comes from fire and lifeguard services and its sadly expanding. If you are in the lifesaving or fire rescue community we implore you to join our boating community and learn about our seamanship skills.
Make them yours, but do not ignore this warning. Heed this advice now, today, this minute.

This is not about pride or ego, it is about service and competency. If I had a tooth that needed work done on it i would not go to an automotive technician, I would go to a dentist.

Lifesaving is not Rescue Water Craft Operations. It is only one facet of multi-use competencies required of a competent and qualified Rescue Water Craft Coxswain.

______________________
Posted: April 15, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

ZERO HERO

ZERO

There is no reason to learn from mishap lessons, but there is every reason to prevent them from occurring in the first place!

When mishap admission is confronted, terrible mishaps will stop.

Every Coxswain is responsible for everything that happens to themselves, their team and their operations. Every Coxswain is responsible for the recovery and transport of survivors.

This does not mean getting lucky or dismissing reckless operations underway.

DISHONORABLE MENTION

These operators allow the repeat of potential tragedy because they are willing to hold themselves in risk behaviors that are reckless, dangerous and negligent.

These operators will fight like mad to protect their mishaps and flaws and promote dangerous practices with a passion that would be better reserved for some humble admissions of wrong.

They are not a Hero, they are an Adversary. This makes them destructive.

THE CURE

Make sure first your program is not the problem. Assess your program functionality by having an accredited boating safety instructor with current credentials assess the program. After that its time to tackle personnel issues.

1. Remove them from operations.

2. Roll back to training and remedial action.

3. Document with accuracy the inconsistencies in operations.

4. Counsel with appropriate operational behaviors.

5. Enforce them.

Safety is a way of being. It is not a certificate. It is what that individual does with the knowledge that makes ore breaks operations. Stay steady, stay true and remember that risk is not a word, its our friend challenging us to be responsible.

______________________
Posted: April 15, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

CHAOS BY VOLITION

CHAOS

The majority of Rescue Water Craft (RWC) operators are not RWC Coxswains. They are unsafe operators who believe they are doing the job appropriately, however their practices are negligent, it’s easy to identify.

Here are a few examples:

1. Hulls are not in the water
2. Operators are constantly jumping waves and wakes
3. Operators lack seamanship skills resulting in unstable craft
4. Operators use improper riding position and unsafe boating practices.

HONORABLE MENTION

Not to mention they do not understand how to maintain the boats and have no supporting data to justify inspections.

To mediate between the two is the discovery that there is a safe place in training, and a dangerous place residing in the individual ego. Both are at war with one another as a dynamic catastrophe of limitation.

Let’s say it loudly.

Ego driven operators are weak, they are paralyzed by their own unknowns by not confronting danger with competency measures.

Through observation of videos online in social media posts, they hold onto their behaviors and the refusal to ask for help or critique.

ADVICE

They hide in the shadows rather than brave the flaws of learning. This is how a program collapses when this arbitrary fate of protecting corrupt behaviors is endorsed as ‘normal’.

When operators strive to protect the wrongs they endorse, they are not welcome in our maritime community. Seamanship skills were built upon the deaths of mariners, crude, hard and harrowing deaths.

Train like your life and others depend upon it, but first understand what that means.

As my mother used to tell me 'get over yourself'. Best advice I was ever given.

______________________
Posted: April 15, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

RESCUE DRAMA

WATER RESCUE DRAMA

Every time we train, we are exposed to complexities by the dynamics of nature and our human framework. This is to increase from the insufficiencies of the last complex learning objective.

 Danger
 Risk
 Behavior

SACRIFICE

Or you can sacrifice your reputation, equipment and well being by regressing to not participating in effective training:

 Closed mind
 Restrictive to danger and its remedial necessary corrections
 Endorsing tragedy in service

RESPONSIBLE PEOPLE ARE GREATLY ADMIRED

How can you increase functionality through service and reduce drama?

1. Research your program need, make a list and check the boxes
2. Source multiple outlets
3. Connect with the boating community and disconnect with lifesaving, you are a boater first!
4. Use your RWC Owner’s Manual
5. Secure an appropriate budget that tracks all program demands
6. Train with credited instructors. Ask them for their boating credentials.
7. Evaluate and track your in-service instructors, are they current in knowledgeable of boat operations?
8. Track your mishaps, do not repeat history

These eight items will assist your department Rescue Water Craft Program to get on target and stay on track!

______________________
Posted: April 15, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

TIME IS VALUE

Time is value, and how we spend it is priceless. Let's take a look at your program motivation.

What are your top 4 standards in which you measure your Rescue Water Craft program foundation upon?

Here are a few of mine I would like to share for your consideration and review:

1. Recurring Education
2. Goals
3. Time
4. Results

CRITIQUE

In training my role is not to be anyone's friend. In fact my role is the obverse.

I am there to scrutinize behavioral choices that result in operational movements.

Scrutiny at this level helps guide the student Coxswain closer to their maritime goals of manning the helm and becoming competent at boat handling skills.

Review the training goals again:

1. Knowledge base
2. Leadership, management and critically honest assessments
3. Research and study
4. Action

REPEAT

To encourage a team member is to make them strong.

When that happens the team gains.

Lead them so they can win.

Then you know you really care for them. Monitor all the safety elements and its a double win for both you and your team members.

You have to push them to their limits to learn. Otherwise they will never attain the necessary and vital capabilities to conduct safe and sure behaviors in natural settings that are unpredictable and dangerous.

This cannot be negotiated. When the RWC community stops, slows down, discards and excuses the need to drive hard and train with purpose, a mishap is being invited and I sure will.

That’s how you lose the game. To win the game, skills are honed and taken seriously.

Don't get too comfortable, keep reaching for the next learning level!

__________

Posted 1.16.2019

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

POSITIVE IS POWER

Positive is power and it begins with you.  Respect your ways and you respect your life and those around you.

K38 is your biggest cheerleader! We know what it takes to do the hard work, take the hard hits, and endure the critics.

Positivity cannot be smashed even by the most ardent deniers.

That is what makes you so great! Otherwise you would not be taking your precious time to read this validation you so greatly deserve.

Thank you for caring about your career and the reputation of those around you.

Work, attitude and commitment over the long haul will bring you there.

Maintain your positive attitude, it has served you well up until this point and it will not disappoint your future.

Positive actions create solutions.

Positive attitude creates a calm atmosphere under pressure when a disruption will create additional chaos.

Nobody wants to be around a negative personality, they are distractions from forward progress and need to be deflected.

Even if you are surrounded by doubters and naysers who bully and chide your dedication and focus, don’t assume their problems as your own. Smile back at yourself and carry on.

No matter what comes your way, you are the power of the greater good for the long term results.

The more positive you remain over the endurance of your career, the more benefits others receive. Your actions matter most, more than negativity, it crushes the disaster of that realm with the ‘can do’ attitude of getting things done, doing them right and avoiding collisions or mishaps.

We need more people like you to maintain that watch!

_______________________

Posted 1.13.2019

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

USE IT

It's now what you know, is how you use what you know when its time to launch your Rescue Water Craft.

You may know what your operational goals are but are you capable of executing them under pressure?

Its easy to do a drill, repeat a drill, say 'good job' and close the day.

When it suddenly gets real, knowledge is only an extension of actions addressed under duress.

That's where the chaff is separated from the stalk.

It requires a lot of repetitive corrections with the unknown. Team work is essential because your teammates can remind you where you are dropping off and how to stay in forward motion. Always work with the elements at hand, not in opposition.

SECONDS AND FEET

What can you do to get ready?

I have a simple formula that will help you.

Count.

Starting counting in 'SECONDS AND FEET'.

This is how we measure our training performance of our Coxswains.

It's not about time, its about forward movement.

Are they smooth?

Is the Coxswain maintaining a level boat?

Are the keeping the Rescue Water Craft stable by using proper balance techniques?

Is the Coxswain and the Crew steady? Are they working together or opposing each others vital actions?

Be Consistent in Behaviors and Constantly Asses, Critique and Correct.

KEEP THINKING

KEEP THINKING and KEEP MOVING!

Both of these behaviors reveal the mind of the Coxswain, their determinations and the exposure of their accountable actions.

You can evaluate these behaviors in a step by step method of risk.

1. Are they maintaining a watch?
2. Do they use effective helm management?
3. Is their throttle modulation accurate and safe?
4. Are they making a safe contact approach with the survivors in the water?
5. Did they secure their stop appropriately?

If you answered a hearty 'no' to any of these, you have some good work ahead of you!

The good news is you just modernized your program!

We thank you and your survivors will be eternally grateful for your safe management and professionalism.

Remember: A moment for safety will save a lifetime of regret.

____________________

Posted 1.13.2019

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

LEARN

The Value of Training is the admission of the necessity for improvement. Training is also a vital extension of preventative maintenance.

If something isn’t quite working out as expected, address it.

This applies to the physical actions of Coxswains as much as it does to the tools they need to administer their program success.

If you have a team mentality that will do things the way they have always been done, maybe its time to inspect that closely. Everything in our world is moving forward, but water rescue has been stagnant in product development or new training updates and that is not good!

Admit where you or your program is wrong or flawed. Don't skirt it, don't ignore it and don't give it an excuse or delay. Fix it, and fix it strong and sure so that you do not suffer a casualty or loss. (or worse).

Making admissions in the errors of program or equipment use is lifesaving, its your life and your teammates. It starts with the most simplest of your tools.

Learning is about review. Its about sustainability and performance measures.

1. Itemize the needs
2. Deduct the problems
3. Fulfill the Solutions
4. Evaluate the results.

You cannot learn until you start taking some corrective actions. Its not just on the water where things go wrong, its starts with the program and long before you head to the boat ramp to launch.

You can start with something as simple as your engine cut off switch and lanyard.

Are you sure you are using the correct engine cut off switch for your Rescue Water Craft?

INSPECT

You need a minimum of 6 engine cut of switches or 'kill switches' as some refer to them.

The generic slang is simply using the word 'lanyard' to shorten the sentence structure.

It is a lot to say 'grab your engine cut off switch lanyard', but that is the correct term.

So, go get them right now. I'll wait for you...................

REPLACE

Broken, cracked or damaged, its time to replace like this engine cut off switch

Welcome back!

How many do you have in front of you? One of three?

Here is a solid suggestion for you.

1. Emergency use for the RWC (in case of emergency only)
2. 1 for the Coxswain
3. 1 for the Crew Member
4. 1 on board for replacement in case of loss or damage underway.
5. Additional 2 spares back at the marine unit location to replace the damaged ones.

Okay, you you need at least 6 engine cut off switches honestly.

Well if you don't have replacements you may have to take your Rescue Water Craft out of service until new ones arrive. That could takes weeks on order during the peak season.

How do you inspect them?

Just like any other sensitive equipment:

1. Breaks, fractures, splits or cracks
2. Lanyard frayed or worn
3. Long term age (yeah replace old gear)
4. Make sure you are using the correct key to begin with!

Engine Cut Off Switches should be specific to the Make, Year and Production model of the Rescue Water Craft you use.

Inspect after every single use.
Inspect annually.

Remember, this is part of your minimum Rescue Water Craft carriage requirements and the single most important accessory you can have while underway.

Now that you have the engine cut off switch done, go do the line and inspect every other item in your Marine Unit RWC Shed!

You are off to a good start!
__________

Posted 1.13.2019

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

INTENTION TO FAIL

INTENTION OF FAILURE

The intention of failure motivates others to fail. So the experience becomes familiar and then everything is okay in the worst possible way.

What is the answer for this?

The framework of the answer is in the validity of achievement.

Is achievement protected in the measure of repetitive failure so that only one element of the hierarchy cannot be disputed?

Some people don't want to succeed because they are only familiar with not forging ahead. Sometimes its due to budget, sometimes to political edges and sometimes its a personal problem. And sometimes its because of poor imitation.

Familiarity can become dangerous if its aligns with complacency. High risk operations require a higher level of accounting. Don't slack or back down, stay on the edge of concern and manage it. Slow things down if its getting too fast.

How about we focus on the definition of failure:

noun
1. an act or instance of failing or proving unsuccessful; lack of success:
His effort ended in failure. The water rescue was a failure.

2. nonperformance of something due, required, or expected:
a failure to do what one has promised; a failure to appear.

3. a subnormal quantity or quality; an insufficiency:
the failure of the team

SACRED TRUST

Don't assume everything will be fine. Know your team. Know your equipment. Risk is a real problem for us, managing it is even more severe. Take inventory and be honest. You will feel better and everyone will benefit from your leadership concerns

What is our rational purpose of the consequence of lifesaving? WE have several elements:

1. The Mindset of the Team and Leadership
2. The assets put in place
3. The management of the marine unit needs

We can outline in a practical manner the route of failure.

Its conducted by the review of our mishaps, the study of maritime history or the evaluation of other agency mishaps and an honest accounting of the pitfalls therein.

The paramount issue that faces our Maritime RWC culture is ‘what do to do about that? A discovery phase must be embarked.

One answer is to find the meaning of the utility of RWC purpose and effective us and the associated safety of those risks observed. We need to question but not miss the point.

We have to discover these before we are led away to another mishap by those who enforce failure by doing nothing at all to remedy it.

In our world we deal with suffering, either from malevolence, natural incidents, accident or ignorance, these are some of the instance of accident or peril.

We are a point of contact in that path, but recovery continues after tragedy for everyone. Hence, review, review, review!

Bearing the tragic consequence surrounding water rescue, is the notice of engaging in something meaningful, something sacred.

For those who lost their compassion they often choose the adversarial account of survivors, distancing themselves from the meaningful action that is worth the suffering and controversy to modernize a program.

Allow your survivors to teach you well.

Question a way of being that may need to be modified or retired. Courage to conduct actions in a manner that can reveal itself in the moment of risk that are relationship bound. You, your craft, your mechanic, your team, the survivors.
This is the price of experience.

COURAGE

Its even more important to question products, their structural failures and common sense red flags. If you have catastrophic failures with purchased gear, document the issues and contact the manufacturer with your concerns.

Ask for for remedial solutions. Make sure that it's not because you abused the product or mismanaged it, and if it is - address that head on with your team.

Taking responsibility with your own volition for the suffering and tragedy of those in peril while you are operating and work to remediate it as a conduit of good. You may be saving your own life first.

Here is what I tell myself when working: I am you and you are I. I am like the survivor and they are like myself. My experience is that I want to come home safely, not take reckless actions into emotion, but to be responsible for my actions and remediate accordingly to success.

I don’t want to place a barrier in my experience by jumping a wave with my RWC, operating in fear, not having technical control in confined spaces and on and on…

Reject the excuses of those who provide barriers and fail to bear the responsibility of leading properly. Question everything presented to you in the RWC training workups by conducting you own vigilance.

• Get to know the maritime community.
• Become knowledge of the ATONs
• Understand the mechanics of your Rescue Water Craft and appropriate maintenance
• Learn about atmospheric pressure systems and water conditions
• Investigate new technologies and products
• Become curious about private companies and their leading edges of real world experience

If you do not believe this is relative and reject it there is something wrong in your soul. There is a path of rejecting failures that would present to you your own.

Fear the lack of progress. It can cause great harm to you and others.

__________

Posted 1.13.2019

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

INHERITANCE

Inheritance is an extension of the past to ensure the future.

In 1973 the Kawasaki JS 400 was soon to make an appearance. The Jet Ski® was destined to revolutionize lifesaving and we didn’t even know it at that time. Not until 1974 were those waters tested. And Kawasaki got right to business!

Wake of Fame Inductee


Wake of Fame inductee Steve Stricklin who was working for Kawasaki during this time began showing the stand up Jet Skis to local southern California Lifeguards.

Visit: WAKE OF FAME AWARDS

GRANDADDY OF THE SPORT

Steve is the inventor of a towable accessory device (TAD) for Personal Water Craft which eventually arrived to the modern rescue boards used today. He affixed a piece of indoor/outdoor green carpet by using rivets to the stern boarding area of a JS400.

On behalf of Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA, Steve went to Huntington Beach City Lifeguards bringing with him one of the Jet Skis and gave them a demonstration. This was the very first interaction of public service agencies being exposed to the potential of lifesaving using this unique new power craft.

A Stand Up Jet Ski in those days required great skill to manage in the surf zone. Lifeguards took off on them kneeling in the tray area. Since lifeguards were surfers they had pretty good balance and picked up on them for their first demos quickly.

LEGACY

We’ve come a long way since those days. We inherited an incredible legacy from these early pioneers.

We owe it to them to maintain the same standards we received from them:

1. Know the Jet Ski®
2. Know the Environment You Operate in
3. Maintain the Jet Ski®
4. Don’t Wipeout and Don’t Lose your Jet Ski®
5. Head out Safe and Come Back Safe
6. The more you ride the better you get

When you inherit something valuable, it is up to you to maintain it and to look after it and ensure that you can pass it along to the next generation.

Lifesaving is a calling. It's practicality rests in the assets and tools used for the job and the mentality of those Coxswains and instructors manning the helm.

And don’t forget these immortal words of Brian Bendix Wake of Fame inductee and first generation Jet Skier:

“A moment for safety will save a lifetime of regret”.

__________

Posted 1.12.2019

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.