DAY OF THE LEG DRAG

RED FLAG WARNING

I was racing at Long Beach at the Marine Stadium with the world’s greatest Jet Skiers. Many of my friends know this place well as first generation Jet Skiers; that was our hallowed ground for RPM loads! We all have race stories. This is one that helped me climb the ladder we call life.

To be on a track during that time was high energy! The competitive spirit and drive was a birthplace of everything that came after in Personal Water Craft racing.

New engines, pipes, pumps, anything you can think of was being engineered, designed and tested, curiosity was a fever. Development was a weekly high. This was part of the Jet Ski Fever.

I was a weekend stand up Jet Ski® racer; meaning I was a mother first, had my own business and was working hard to get the time and funds to compete on the weekends. And how we raced!

We had qualifiers, heats, last chance qualifiers and main events. Easily up to 50 women would vie for the limited top positions for the mains. Every main event was earned.

Racers with amazing talent across the nation would drive hundreds to thousands of miles to compare themselves to others. They represented 50% of the equation, the powerhouse gamble was their custom build and race teams.

Women were on these tracks. Lots of women!

These women opened the door for motorsports. They are Jet Ski icons and mavens. They gave a gift to this generation that should be determined in honor and gratitude.

Some day this current generation of female racers needs to do the same for those coming up behind them and we encourage them increase and not decrease the worth of our efforts. We gave a lot to this sport for 'future generations'.

We determine this to represent a code of honor for racing to rest upon. And for those who built it before me, I thank you.

Prominent Race Names come to mind:
Brenda Burns, Celeste Peterson, Bonnie Burns (Brenda's mother), Kelly Koster, Bonnie Gordon, and Cindy Coffman.

There was a race every weekend in California. BC Racing was our Region 1 promoter and I would enter 4-5 events. Whatever they had to offer I signed up: freestyle, closed course, obstacle, slalom and the gran prix (long distance).

My Jet Ski® was salvation. It kept me sane with the hectic pace of life I adopted as an adult juggling a lot of responsibilities. This was therapy for me. My Jet Ski® taught me about myself, racing was the delivery of tempered emotions, responsibility and dedication.

This was my right of passage. Mentorship came from those on the sides; my husband, my daughters my race mechanic, a variety of great holders and Kawasaki Motors Corporation and finally the IJSBA and it’s promoters. Those promoters worked very hard to put on their events. Even harder today with the reduced participant numbers.

Interesting fact which is the basis of this story. I did the first leg drag at the BC race at the marine stadium for us gals in my division. I was just starting to get into a race groove regionally.

At this race I had the pole position on the start in the main I had earned through the qualifiers.

The week prior I had been practicing the leg drag at WOT and got really good with it. I was competent and strong. I decided to use it in the next race. The men had been doing this for a while and I aspired to race like they did because I admire their power and aggressive drive.

It is race day, I'm on the pole. I get a fair start.

We are heading to the first turn buoy pretty much lined up in a stack off my starboard side. I will take advantage of the pivot on this turn to get the clean water ahead. I feel good.

I throw out my left foot and start the pivot to drag my foot on WOT.. However.......with that being said...........

When a leg drag is thrown the subsequent pitch of the hull offsets the flat bottom and makes a V off the gunwale angle. And guess what? Planing with a deep vee on a sharp edge throws a significant plume of whitewater like a garden hose. Yup, that’s' what it does on a stand up.

The first four riders closest to my starboard side, the first inside racer freaks from the water which I believe they thought I fell (appropriate assumption and a fearful one in a first turn). It's not fun having a blast of water at speed hit your face. This is blind faith to negotiate through streams of water.

Fear of getting hit on the first turn buoy and the next 5 are the highest risk of the race. Positions are challenged with skill and horsepower. Contact with another Personal Water Craft is a legitimate fear. It's real, people have died on race tracks.

Instead of holding their line and braving the turn, they turn sharply to their right and create a 4 boat pile up. I race away into beautiful glass water ahead and negotiate 2 more turn buoys to be faced with a red flag coming at me by a pursuing head on Course Marshal. It was probably Brad Southworth haha.

MINDSET

My happiness and joy I experienced for throwing down a foot was replaced instead by the color of danger. Red was my punishment.

My historic maneuver was diminished in disgrace and my pride slipped away. I was shocked. What the heck happened? Everything was perfect on that first turn! I didn't push anyone! I felt pigeonholed; men would never be given a red flag for a leg drag on the first turn! The guy who pushed the pack however would be! Rats! Suck it up Shawn, own it.

I track back towards the starting line wondering what happened and how that crash happened since it was behind me and not in front of me, I had no idea. I reset my mindset to get back on the track in my head and make a repeat stellar performance. I am not hoping for this. I want the win. Goals!

I get on the line with my holder and the rest of the racers recollect. The Course Marshal drives up to my pole position and places his hand to his head and taps it. What? What? He points to me! What? Nobody else?

I have been assessed the penalty on the start! I received this due to my fellow female racers not ready for the change and pushing through the risk. Which is not easy in a motorsport.

I was ready. It was time we climb one more rung in the race ladder. Change does not come easy or with acceptance, it comes from friction against the status quo.

I have 30 seconds to figure this out and not dwell on disappointment. My holder walks away. Dead start with no holder and a hand on my head signals absolute defeat. It is obvious I'm in a pinch. I am not going to waste the money I invested.

There is a level of shame involved in being the recipient of an infraction, sometimes it's worthy. It’s usually temporary because racing has no place for emotions, feelings are distractions. Racing only has a podium that dominates the waterspace.

Everyone there knows it’s me, I'm the one to dispute. There is no way to protest. 'Racer's fire up your engines'; so helmet down, refocus. Have fun and ride smart.

Spectators love drama, crashes and negativity.

Race teams like winning. These spectacles are to revel in the disaster by enjoying the setback one experiences.
This is the gladiator in the coliseum and we are all mere entertainment. People prefer damage to success. Essentially, we reduce this to one word ‘drama’.

Feeding drama is pointless and a distraction to race success.

Races have lots of drama. I decline to participate. It's back to the rule book and what it says for dead engine starts.

I have no holder now. I am alone on the start line standing in hip deep water. My fellow sister racers are all on game with their pumps out of the water revving up their pipes red hot. Damn! That sound is beautiful!

It wakes me up and I smile, I love that compression sound. That is why I am here.

They load their boats into the water for their final push and level out the hull as their holders strains to control their crafts straight, their heads are tucked and ready to battle the first turn.

DEAD LAST

I look over at them in their game. I notice the first four to my right. They are intent on the first turn buoy and not distracted. They are waiting for the Course Marshal to turn the card. The hold their breath waiting for the band to snap. Boats are fully loaded.

I make a decision that I will meet them on the track and dominate their track lines. I will pass every single one of them I tell myself. That is my goal. I am going to let myself go.

I thank them for my race ahead. In my mind I run a quick win on fast forward.

The rubber band snaps. They are off on that wonderful ‘wot wot wot’ sound with the tell-tale whitewash that is the signature of thrust and super stock power.

As they race away, I start my Jet Ski loaded sideways on my hip to not overload the back pressure of the exhaust and drop the hull into the water.

I pull my throttle drawing a left knee into the tray, I stand up and tuck down and I pin it to win it. I’m tracking over their wonderful trailing jet wash wakes. I race as if there are 11 race boats at my side.
They have all crossed the first inside line buoy and are fighting for the hierarchy structure on the track.

I ride my race on my terms. I unleash permission and I let my race boat do its job. I don’t interfere. I let my boat do all the work and I stay in step with it. My breathing is calm and steady.

I am in that space of wonder. That internal mind. That hidden area that is given permission to awake where before slumber was comfortable and convenient in the middle of the pack.

The track is tight, with a lot of buoy turns and laps. I pick off every single racer on the track one by one. I win the race. From dead last I was number 1.

I knew I was going to win that race. In my mind, I had won that race before I started the boat. I cannot say that about any other race I had been in prior to this one.

I am a bit surprised honestly I am doing this. I never imagined I would pass this many race boats or even have the talent to do so, let alone competitive horsepower.

I won that race because of my sister racers. They also won with me.

If that call was not made against me, I would not have tapped into the hidden mind of permission. It was this race that I became an Apex Predator. I finally figured it out in my head! But it took the color of red to guide me and a failure.

I learned from that race a valuable lesson: Give Yourself Permission

This lesson is mindset through spirit. I teach this capability to my Rescue Water Craft students. One must wnat it and not be afraid to succeed.

It can be used for anything in life. Not everyone has it or wants it. This is something developed inside the internal will of a human who has a hunger for greatness. It is a passage.

My sister racers are my champions. They are my personal race heroes.

Without them I would be nothing. With them I am something.

They are part of my team, not adversaries. If we are not pushing one another towards greatness we are holding one another back and that my dear friends is the most selfish act of all in competition.

Keep in mind that we also had up to 4 log jumps and sometimes mini ramps on the closed course race track. Not like today where race tracks have reduced women's stand-up racing to a token of risk in a reverse discrimination against everything us first generation racers fought for. And loved!

We weren't afraid of ramp jumps or log jumps, they were equalizers of talent just like the slalom event.

Racing today is a fragment of the raw excitement it used to be. We can thank promoters and track design for that disaster. Runabouts do not belong on our closed course tracks. Yes, quote me because evidence is my master and it should be yours as well. And the evidence does not lie, but people do.

Runabouts are best suited for endurance and offshore race events due to mass weight, distance of travel and speed vs risk and safety. I'll save that for another story.

Moral of my race story:
Racing isn’t fair and neither is life.

We earn our effort and sometimes it’s taken away. But we keep on keeping on.

We respect our competitors and honor them.

They are us and we are them.

______________________
Posted: June 23, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

ASK ABOUT YOUR WORST BEHAVIORS

CONCEPTUAL SCHEMES OF LEARNING

ASK ABOUT YOUR WORST BEHAVIORS – IMPROVE FOR THE BEST RESULTS

When you ask about your worse behaviors, be ready to hear the truth. Evaluate and determine the resulting changes that are needed. Put them into motion and self-assess. Ask your instructor for additional advice or corrections.

Question the results.

It is up to you to decide how you want your Coxswain seamanship skills to develop. You can expect two metrics; good or bad.
What interactions in the field by your vessel and water knowledge can determine safe speeds, a competent program and reduce failures and to be able to communicate and negotiate for a secure operation.

PRUDENT MARINER

We cannot control the weather or the water conditions. However we can control ourselves. When we know where our capabilities last rested, we can appreciate that we are capable of much more!

Do you have a perception or a conceptual idea of what you limit is? Trust me, there is more. Perhaps you are too comfortable and
you haven't taken time to stay updated. There is nothing worse than to close the book and forget what you learned.

Pull out your training notes and review them.
Watch your training videos and look for the useless points of action and signal the highlights of potential.

STRUCTURE OF REALITY

If you don’t do that you are going to continue to develop unsettled disputes that will arise during operations and those options you entertained it the beginning of your training need to be tested. If they work, improve upon them. If you still cannot secure a stop or operate with efficiency and technical advantage, something is wrong.

Negotiate for a better program. Begin with yourself. Your actions will tell your story, but you must pay attention to them and create a metric of success or failure. From there you can determine if your course is dysfunctional or safe.

______________________
Posted: May 14, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

LIVE LIKE YOUR HERO

LEGITIMACY

You are that person, its a legitimate potential of chaos and risk, and we want to come home and that is reliant on all our decisions in actuality.

Live like your hero or die a zero, cute sentence right? Could be true for some who have lost their life because one important action was missing from their behaviors underway.

We help each other when we help ourselves, we hold ourselves responsible and its an indication that we are the stewards that transform the risk of life lost to the recovery of life, and they are people, real like you and I. We are them and they are us.

We don't want you to suffer the neglect of an incomplete behavior or program. We care and our partners care. That is why we are in business and its a reflection of our mission.

Restrain your emotions and upgrade your professionalism. Yes this is important and its not just chatter.

Digital communication has evolved and we have adjusted, we must consider the objectives of digital influence. The competitiveness of attention online is a cycle of weakness.

The cycle of seeking likes and an audience we need to be cautious, publishing misleading content is not to be rewarded.

We need to triumph the negotiation of will that works diligently towards not causing harm.

We cannot afford a mishap the same as we cannot afford an unreputable post. It is your role to judge and decipher competency, this requires effort and investigation.

TAKE ACTION

Our communication and connectivity is greatly impacted by social media. We communicate in forums, private messages and groups. We confront publicly or privately the world we work in and how we want to transform deadly potentials into safe practices.

We have all made mistakes, we hold ourselves accountability because we believe we are the steward of this sacred trust. We have a huge responsibility, its a significant burden in fact. Let's make our digital footprint one of validity, valor and encouragement of safe practices.

How can you live like your Hero? Most of our outreach is conducted on social media. You can be a digital hero or a zero, ensure that your posts are clearly stated and that if you are presenting an argument, be prepared to have a solution.

If the photo or video shows behaviors that are skeptical, move on.

Think about what you are posting.

1. Is this your current knowledge level
2. Have you seen other practices that may challenge it
3. Have you researched the difference and made a conclusion on which direction to follow?

If they are not representing safe practices, move on. If they are not showing boating navigation rules properly, move on. If they are sensationalizing and hyping up dangerous and negligent operations, move on.

THINGS HAVE TO MAKE SENSE

There has to be meaning in our shares, this is how we can sustain our maritime community. We do need to challenge and discuss pertinent information. It should not be impulsive and narrow but by taking on the high end of responsibility and then you have a reason to question motives and results. You become a credit to yourself and our community, and we need you!

Digital conflict is real, and sometimes its not sufficient and lacks the next step and can be misinterpreted. Make sure you outline that and explain it in your descriptive field.

Professionalism will place their name on their work, their articles will be consistent and well sourced. Follow these people. Use your tools for searches.

Many online pages are stealing content, altering the original presentation and altering it for dramatization and likes. Be careful if you repost these type of images. Take responsibility for your choices, its going to take you time, yes, but you may be a leader that is needed now and people are listening!

Think before you share information that is misinformation, be the solution. Lives depend upon it!

____________

Posted: April 28, 2019

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

Public Safety Law Loan Program

Yamaha or Kawasaki ‘Law Loan Program’

Yamaha or Kawasaki ‘Law Loan Program’

This program was set up through the efforts of the PWIA (Personal Water Craft Industry Association) in partnership with the manufacturers.

This is NOT a mandatory program for dealerships, it is voluntary and up to the discretion of the participating dealership based off of past positive or negative experiences with public safety agencies or a willingness to serve the community with quality resources.

You can go to the following websites to start the investigative process:

1. Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA
Kawasaki Dealer Locator

2. Yamaha Motors Corporation USA
Yamaha Dealer Locator

Kawasaki JET SKI STX 15-F

Participating Dealerships

Locate the nearest dealerships in your region. You will be looking at a 3-seater Personal Water Craft (PWC). Prepare a list of questions to ask the dealer representative.

Some public safety agencies also request for additional assets, however we are only going to discuss the Rescue Water Craft (RWC) which is the occupational term for our type of maritime asset, known as Personal Water Craft recreationally.

1. Yamaha-WaveRunner®

2. Kawasaki-JET SKI® (Ultra LX or STX 15-F)

Be prepared to conduct investigative work!

Make a list and keep notes on your contact progress.

Or you can purchase a 2019 Ultra JET SKI® ULTRA® LX MSRP $11,199. Sometimes this is a good option after you work with the
Law Loan program.

The Law Loan Program has been going strong for several decades!

Public Safety Agency Responsibilities

Make contact with the dealer leadership and ask if they participate on the “Law Loan Program’ for public safety agencies.

3. Write a Letter of request on agency letterhead and submit back to the participating dealership.
What you may be responsible for:

• Provide a Personal Water Craft trailer that is rated to transport a 1,000 lb. craft at 11.6” inches in length. (No shorty trailers, must be a properly sized trailer for the length/weight of the craft)
• Pay for any damages during the loan period
• Remove any agency stickers (do not remove manufacturer stickers) upon return
• Insure the water vehicle
• Professional certification for Coxswains and Crew operating the RWC (Rescue Water Craft)
• Rescue boards and accessories are not included. Rescue Boards may also damage the stern deck of a RWC so be prepared to compensate for any friction damages.
• Do not drill any holes or add any hardware to the craft during loan, do not alter the craft.
• Abide by the maintenance schedule and pay for the needed maintenance such as required hourly inspections and oil changes.


Yamaha WaveRunner VX Cruiser HO can be purchased for $11,499.00

Make sure you have prepared an effective annual budget for the following:
1. Maintenance Schedule
2. Hourly Maintenance Schedule
3. Training
4. Personal Protective Equipment for Personnel
5. Accessory devices (rescue board, tow lines, fuel cans, etc.)
6. Return damage fees acquired during the loan period
7. Fuel & Fuel conditioner for prevention of damages from the effects of Ethanol
8. Transportation: Trailer, Vehicle, tow hitches, electrical, tires and tie downs

Participating dealerships will need to sell the water vehicle when the loan program is over. These participating dealerships are for profit businesses and need to turn over the floor stock inventory. Be sure that you return the Personal Water Craft that you have conducted a thorough review of the craft.

I would advise you to do the following:

1. When you receive the water vehicle take photos of the top, bottom, port/starboard and interior of the craft.
2. When you are ready to prepare the craft for return prior to removing decals/stickers take the same round of photos.
3. When returning the water craft take the final third round of the photos for records.

Make sure that you ask in advance what fees you will incur for the maintenance of the craft and how long the dealership will have the asset for these repairs or schedules so you can adjust your operations in the field when you take the unit(s) out of service.

Keep detailed records of your training and maintenance, focusing on the engine hours in your daily checklists.

Make sure that every team member reads the Owner’s Manual and understands the content and is able to translate it effectively and surely.

Good luck in your search! We hope you find a matching dealer who is willing to support and has the appropriate resources to do so.

This is a wonderful program started by (ret.) Roger Hagie’s Public Relations guru from Kawasaki, he is a great friend, a Wake of Fame Inductee and a champion for public safety and lifesaving!

_______________________________

Posted 11.2.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

DEAD ZONE

Rescue Water Craft Dead Zone

The 'Dead Zone' is an area astern of the third seated position of the Rescue Water Craft (RWC). It incorporates the stern eye area, stern deck and the re-boarding handle and is referred to when using a TAD.

This area is one to observe for safety due to the range of motion between the Rescue Water Craft and the Towable Aquaplane Device (TAD-Rescue Board). This area is a location that we are aware of regarding a variety of movements and therefore have termed it the 'dead zone', meaning this is an area we try not to make physical contact with our hands and are mindful of body placement. It is a 'no go' area.

We utilize a developmental attitude of behavior regarding body placement on a TAD and try our best to minimize contact areas and hazards with a concerted awareness of possible strike zones, both from using a TAD and on board the RWC.

Be aware that not all operational situations will be possible to maintain efficiency in body placement or range of motion. These are best determined by the Coxswain training level, instructional content and familiarity with weather, vessel, TAD and not limited to being able to define the forces of action and range of motion and the objectives of training.

This requires of Coxswains and Crew members to have professional understanding and behavioral training regarding this risk area.

Items to consider during training with a TAD:

1. Type of RWC and TAD
2. Conditions of water and weather
3. Communications between Coxswain/Crew and training goals
4. Review, correction and counseling of supervisor and/or Coxswain/crew operations
5. Speed of the craft and turning radius applied with associated weight distribution on the TAD
6. TAD connectivity

It is impossible to cover everything we would normally prescribe in our training program for student candidates. We can give you some ideas to ponder and size up against common sense and water safety. Let's dig in!

Rescue Boards rest on the top transom stern deck and centerline connection point from the bow of the Towable Aquaplane
Device (TAD-Rescue Board) is typically affixed to the RWC stern eye.

We do not add any additional hardware to the upper RWC deck due to vessel and passenger safety. We would not advise
agencies or personnel to drill holes through the RWC hull and add additional bow eyes to the top deck. Especially if
working in flood environments or drawing bodies over these areas.

These could become strike points, facial contact, create entanglement or entrapment, wrap long hair (scalping) or garments and cause breaks/fractures/amputations of fingers if rings are worn.

Port and Starboard side rescue board tether points generally are affixed to the trailer tie down eye points underneath the RWC top deck bond line. The trailer tie down eyes are actually a very strong tow point, but rarely is there direct load on these two points. Generally there is a giveway or slack and shock effect depending upon the style of board, the interface of connectivity and the amount of weight pushing downward with gravitational force.

Rescue boards are not floating per se, they are dragging, pivoting, rising and lowering. They are a towable aquaplane device that rests semi forward on the stern deck of a Rescue Water Craft.

There is a pitch upward and downward at the fulcrum point of interface between the rescue board bottom deck. There is also interface of the bow tether point that can crease the topside of the rescue board if too much force is applied or if pinned against a fixed object or rolled such as in waves. Always touch check and visibly inspect your rescue board and retire when needed.

When in a training environment we coach our students as role players to understand the risks to bodily injury using a TAD such as placing their head when lying in a prone face down position to port or starboard astern of the craft and to monitor survivors body positioning or changing positions while underway.

When underway in the same fashion changes of body position will occur with the interface between water movement and Coxswain helms control and trim. There is not a lot of deck space however we have studied the most practical methods by observing RWC, board, water and human movements and have determined that the 'dead zone' is a clear reminder for personal safety.

It's easy to say and clear to remember. This is a non-operative area. No hands should be in this area between the board and the boat, these are pinch points due to the lifting up and downward motions between the two leverage points.

This takes some time for students to incorporate into their training skillsets, this does not happen as a behavior during their first rotation. It takes many reminders and self assessment to correct and enable the safety behaviors. These corrections can be mere inches and change while underway due to vessel movement or body positioning.

It is important to consider anchor points, handheld points, foot wedges (not entrapment) and the pivot or sway of the rescue board. This does not mean they are gaining any visual capabilities. This is a measure to protect the head from either lifting and rising, or dropping and striking the ‘Dead Zone’ area in case of mishap.

There are a lot of contributing factors. Video review of incorrect and correct methods may assist you in understanding the risks and determining what would be the best course of action with the make and model of RWC and board. This is a difficult discussion to harness without proper coaching, so do not use all of this as a set in stone way of operating. There are many contributing actions that apply, such as operator and crew knowledge, Rescue Board inspection, RWC inspection and a firm understanding of the waterway you will be training and working under. And then, add pressure of a real life situation.

This is also a safety consideration during transport of survivors. Another rule we would like you to consider along with the 'dead zone' is a safe speed transport set at about 25 miles per hour. There are many technical needs, so don't fixate on just one, we teach hundreds of variations that enable the operators to select their underway options.

Don't forget that wise saying 'where the head goes the body follows'.

Use Common Sense, Evaluate, Study, Learn and Correct

REVIEW YOUR PROGRAM USE

Let's recap:

1. Do not add hardware to the RWC top deck where bodies come in contact
2. Observe the Dead Zone area astern and be mindful of points of contact
3. Safe Speeds Underway (25 mph rule), crew communicates with Coxswain is speed is determined unsafe
4. Coxswains maintain a level, steady and stable RWC at all times, Crew maintains the efficiency use of survivor loading and
underway security and secures the final stop measures
5. Observe counterbalance measures between the RWC and TAD and Persons on Board (POB).

We spend a lot of focus time to work with rescue boards to gain understanding in simple physics, vessel/board type, water dynamics and operator technical abilities. We want our Coxswains and Crew to be 100% responsible for their underway actions. We believe this is possible with a strong mindset, knowledge base and policies that work for success of the mission.

The Dead Zone is a reminder that this area is not a safe zone for us, to respect our board and rescue board use, and we must be mindful of potential impact or strike zones when operating in dynamic conditions other than calm water.

Speed is a critical component of professional marine units, safe operations mean Safe Coxswains and Crew who maintain a safe and successful program!

There are typically three ways of operations for crew to consider and train under until familiarization occurs:

1. Laying prone face down on a TAD
2. Layering weight and body positions on a TAD (multiple persons on board)
3. Kneeling-bracing position on TAD as Crew
4. Sitting position on RWC stern seat

Please consider taking a class and find out what you do not know!

It's far less expensive than the long rough road of mishap review and repair.

We hope to see you in a class!

Posted: 10.27.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

DO NOT USE HIGHLY FLAMMABLE PRODUCTS ON YOUR RWC ENGINE

Never use any type of anti corrosive spray that say ‘highly flammable’ in the Information section.

I have come across far too many of my k38 students who have been given poor advice by others.

This advise could be dangerous or even deadly.

This is why the manufacturer’s of Personal Water Craft give direct advice and guidance for the types of products
they would like clients to use. Many ignore their safety warnings and place themselves and their crews at risk for explosion or injury.

The second threat is to the exhaust cooling rubber hoses. If the hoses lost their structural integrity they will fail. This means a Rescue Water Craft can take on water suddenly and sink. This could end up as a total loss.

Your preventative sprays are to be used with a cooled engine after washing down the engine compartment or completing the fresh water rinse/flush of the exhaust cooling lines.

Pay attention to all your actions and research the information and get other opinions if you are learning.

It does not require much effort and you will do better with your program in many ways.

Shawn Alladio – 6.14.2018


Shawn cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

2018 International Rescue Water Craft Day

RWC DAY

The International Rescue Water Craft Day is an international day of observance to commemorate qualified Rescue Water Craft operators, crews, volunteers and teams.

The Rescue Water Craft Association (RWCA) established the inaugural International Rescue Water Craft Day on June 21st, 2017 and will be celebrated each subsequent year on the anniversary date.

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Rescue Water Craft Day

JOIN US

The promotion of the day symbolizes the dedication, service and commitment towards boating safety and lifesaving. RWCA is the lead agency coordinated events worldwide.

In 2017 the following nations observed the inaugural event by sharing awareness about RWC/PWC boating safety: USA, Poland, Chile, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Event Anniversary Date: June 21st

International Rescue Water Craft Day Motto:
International Rescue Water Craft Day Theme 2018: ‘Because We Care’

Hashtags: #IRWCD #RWCA #RescueWaterCraftDay #BecauseWeCare

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RWC Lifesavers

ABOUT

The International Rescue Water Craft Day is observed around the world each year on June 21st. Established in 2017 by the Rescue Water Craft Association, IRWCD provides a shared day recognizing the commitment to boating safety and to contribute to the Rescue Water Craft community a culture of safety and best practices.

PARTICIPATE

Ways to participate:

1. Post up your Rescue Water Craft Team Photos or Videos. Represent professionalism and standardization, use #IRWCD hashtags
2. Share RWCA IRWCD theme posts to social media outlets
3. Take a Rescue Water Craft boating safety course
4. Make a commitment to representing Rescue Water Craft standards both in practice and operations
5. Make a video representing your commitment to IRWCD and boating safety, post on June 21st

NORTH AMERICA
RWCA FACEBOOK

JAPAN
RWCA JAPAN FACEBOOK

LAW LOAN PROGRAM

PWC LAW LOAN PROGRAM

Yamaha and Kawasaki Public Safety Law Loan Program.

Personal Watercraft Industry Association Law Loan Program This program was set up through the PWIA for public safety agencies to receive loaner craft through participating dealerships

The following information is intended to help your agency to apply for use of Yamaha Water Vehicles in your boating related Public Safety work. The focal point of the program is the local Yamaha Dealer.

Once your documents are prepared you should contact the local Yamaha Water Vehicle dealer in your region.

They in turn will endorse the application and forward it to Yamaha Motors Corporation USA, with their approval to order the unit or units specified in your request. The exceptions to this otherwise straight forward process are the limitations of Yamaha's inventory (a seasonal consideration), and the willingness of the local Yamaha dealer whose participation is strictly voluntary.

In 2018, the PWIA Law Loan Program entered its 30th year supporting public and federal safety agencies with personal watercraft from Yamaha Motors Corporation USA, and Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA. The program began in 1989.

This program has essentially the same terms and conditions in 2012 that it had at its beginnings in 1989, when it was launched. In just the past year over 100 agencies acquired loan units through their local Kawasaki JET SKI® watercraft dealers.

K38 Training Kawasaki TS Jet Ski

CELEBRATING 30 YEARS

In the 22 years of operation, the program has loaned approximately 4000 machines to well over 700 individual agencies. The value of these loans reaches over $20 million.

This program has been a big supporter of American communities saving taxpayers monies and supporting our local law enforcement and Search and Rescue groups.

K38 has been providing Rescue Water Craft boat operations qualification training for these agencies in concert with the PWIA Law Loan Program since 1989.

K38 has assisted hundreds of public safety agencies and thousands of personnel in competency training for these unique small boats.

K38 Training Rescue Water Craft

KAWASAKI PUBLIC SAFETY LAW LOAN PROGRAM

POINTS TO COVER

1. Contact Information: Name, Address, Fax, Email, Agency Name and Contact Person

2. Contact Name and Number of the day (hours of operation) office of the day-to-day officer responsible for the loaned units

3. A brief statement regarding the proposed use or application of the vessel(s), (units)

4. A statement that the agency will be responsible for the routine maintenance and repair of the craft

5. A statement that the units will be returned in a condition of normal wear. Any damages the dealership notes beyond that will be the responsibility of the agency to repair.

6. A statement that the agency will assume all liability for the operation of the craft while in their possession.
As mentioned above, take this letter to your local Yamaha or Kawasaki Water Vehicle Dealer. They will add their endorsement and forward it to our office here in California or Georgia so the machine can be ordered once approved.

You can find a local Yamaha or Kawasaki dealer through their respective websites. Use your area code to conduct a search.

With the recent economic downturn many local dealerships have moved or closed, or perhaps are not participating on the law loan program. You will have to be assertive in your search if your local dealership has closed.

You do not have to stay within your city, you can roam for other surrounding areas to contact dealerships. A dealership will only have so many units available for the program.

POINTS TO COVER

1. Contact Information: Name, Address, Fax, Email, Agency Name and Contact Person

2. Contact Name and Number of the day (hours of operation) office of the day-to-day officer responsible for the loaned units

3. A brief statement regarding the proposed use or application of the vessel(s), (units)

4. A statement that the agency will be responsible for the routine maintenance and repair of the craft

5. A statement that the units will be returned in a condition of normal wear. Any damages the dealership notes beyond that will be the responsibility of the agency to repair.

6. A statement that the agency will assume all liability for the operation of the craft while in their possession.
As mentioned above, take this letter to your local Yamaha or Kawasaki Water Vehicle Dealer. They will add their endorsement and forward it to our office here in California or Georgia so the machine can be ordered once approved.

You can find a local Yamaha or Kawasaki dealer through their respective websites. Use your area code to conduct a search.

With the recent economic downturn many local dealerships have moved or closed, or perhaps are not participating on the law loan program. You will have to be assertive in your search if your local dealership has closed.

You do not have to stay within your city, you can roam for other surrounding areas to contact dealerships. A dealership will only have so many units available for the program.

K38 RECOMMENDS: THINGS TO KNOW IN ADVANCE

Good thing you are reading this! I am going to save you frustration and give you what you need:

PERSPECTIVE

1. Trailers are not included, you will need to supply your own transportation and tie downs

2. You will need to supply additional lanyards for each person on your team and replace them if worn or damaged. If you have a Bombardier, Sea Doo, you will need to have each digital lanyard coded alike off their MPEM program so your lanyards can be keyed the same. Digital keys and lanyards are not interchangeable! If you lose or break them you will not be able to start your craft.

3. Bathing suits are not to be worn, your crew must be wearing full PPE protection, and a USCG approved lifejacket, properly fitted and sized

4. Enter into effective dialogue with your loaner dealership. Do not make any make any
assumptions. Your department is held responsible for any damages to the craft upon return. Put aside an amount of money for repairs or maintenance for your program.

5. Depending upon the make, model, year and agreement, your watercraft will need a tune-up and oil change every 30-50 hours of use. (Oil filter, spark plugs, oil change)

6. Your team will need to understand how to maintain and care for craft.

7. Keep hourly logs on the boats so you can keep your maintenance hours in check.

8. Your operators need to be physically fit. This is an active ride.

9. Your operators need to know how to swim and should be evaluated wearing their full PPE kit

10. Your operators need to have their basic boating skills and current credentials in order. Our K38/NASBLA/NSBC instruction program endorses certification for a period of three years upon expiration. This is a boating standard. No exemptions! Equipment, laws, rules and regulations change, you must stay current with all your operational needs

PWC Manufacturers
1. BRP Sea Doo
2. Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA
3. Yamaha Motors Corporation USA

ABOUT PWIA

Personal Watercraft Industry Association (PWIA) represents U.S. personal watercraft manufacturers. Founded in 1987, the organization was created to promote the safe and responsible operation of personal watercraft. PWIA provides a unified voice for the segment, and represents the interests of personal watercraft manufacturers in legislative and regulatory concerns.

Content Creator - Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.