Public Safety Law Loan Program

Yamaha or Kawasaki ‘Law Loan Program’

Yamaha or Kawasaki ‘Law Loan Program’

This program was set up through the efforts of the PWIA (Personal Water Craft Industry Association) in partnership with the manufacturers.

This is NOT a mandatory program for dealerships, it is voluntary and up to the discretion of the participating dealership based off of past positive or negative experiences with public safety agencies or a willingness to serve the community with quality resources.

You can go to the following websites to start the investigative process:

1. Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA
Kawasaki Dealer Locator

2. Yamaha Motors Corporation USA
Yamaha Dealer Locator

Kawasaki JET SKI STX 15-F

Participating Dealerships

Locate the nearest dealerships in your region. You will be looking at a 3-seater Personal Water Craft (PWC). Prepare a list of questions to ask the dealer representative.

Some public safety agencies also request for additional assets, however we are only going to discuss the Rescue Water Craft (RWC) which is the occupational term for our type of maritime asset, known as Personal Water Craft recreationally.

1. Yamaha-WaveRunner®

2. Kawasaki-JET SKI® (Ultra LX or STX 15-F)

Be prepared to conduct investigative work!

Make a list and keep notes on your contact progress.

Or you can purchase a 2019 Ultra JET SKI® ULTRA® LX MSRP $11,199. Sometimes this is a good option after you work with the
Law Loan program.

The Law Loan Program has been going strong for several decades!

Public Safety Agency Responsibilities

Make contact with the dealer leadership and ask if they participate on the “Law Loan Program’ for public safety agencies.

3. Write a Letter of request on agency letterhead and submit back to the participating dealership.
What you may be responsible for:

• Provide a Personal Water Craft trailer that is rated to transport a 1,000 lb. craft at 11.6” inches in length. (No shorty trailers, must be a properly sized trailer for the length/weight of the craft)
• Pay for any damages during the loan period
• Remove any agency stickers (do not remove manufacturer stickers) upon return
• Insure the water vehicle
• Professional certification for Coxswains and Crew operating the RWC (Rescue Water Craft)
• Rescue boards and accessories are not included. Rescue Boards may also damage the stern deck of a RWC so be prepared to compensate for any friction damages.
• Do not drill any holes or add any hardware to the craft during loan, do not alter the craft.
• Abide by the maintenance schedule and pay for the needed maintenance such as required hourly inspections and oil changes.


Yamaha WaveRunner VX Cruiser HO can be purchased for $11,499.00

Make sure you have prepared an effective annual budget for the following:
1. Maintenance Schedule
2. Hourly Maintenance Schedule
3. Training
4. Personal Protective Equipment for Personnel
5. Accessory devices (rescue board, tow lines, fuel cans, etc.)
6. Return damage fees acquired during the loan period
7. Fuel & Fuel conditioner for prevention of damages from the effects of Ethanol
8. Transportation: Trailer, Vehicle, tow hitches, electrical, tires and tie downs

Participating dealerships will need to sell the water vehicle when the loan program is over. These participating dealerships are for profit businesses and need to turn over the floor stock inventory. Be sure that you return the Personal Water Craft that you have conducted a thorough review of the craft.

I would advise you to do the following:

1. When you receive the water vehicle take photos of the top, bottom, port/starboard and interior of the craft.
2. When you are ready to prepare the craft for return prior to removing decals/stickers take the same round of photos.
3. When returning the water craft take the final third round of the photos for records.

Make sure that you ask in advance what fees you will incur for the maintenance of the craft and how long the dealership will have the asset for these repairs or schedules so you can adjust your operations in the field when you take the unit(s) out of service.

Keep detailed records of your training and maintenance, focusing on the engine hours in your daily checklists.

Make sure that every team member reads the Owner’s Manual and understands the content and is able to translate it effectively and surely.

Good luck in your search! We hope you find a matching dealer who is willing to support and has the appropriate resources to do so.

This is a wonderful program started by (ret.) Roger Hagie’s Public Relations guru from Kawasaki, he is a great friend, a Wake of Fame Inductee and a champion for public safety and lifesaving!

_______________________________

Posted 11.2.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

DEAD ZONE

Rescue Water Craft Dead Zone

The 'Dead Zone' is an area astern of the third seated position of the Rescue Water Craft (RWC). It incorporates the stern eye area, stern deck and the re-boarding handle and is referred to when using a TAD.

This area is one to observe for safety due to the range of motion between the Rescue Water Craft and the Towable Aquaplane Device (TAD-Rescue Board). This area is a location that we are aware of regarding a variety of movements and therefore have termed it the 'dead zone', meaning this is an area we try not to make physical contact with our hands and are mindful of body placement. It is a 'no go' area.

We utilize a developmental attitude of behavior regarding body placement on a TAD and try our best to minimize contact areas and hazards with a concerted awareness of possible strike zones, both from using a TAD and on board the RWC.

Be aware that not all operational situations will be possible to maintain efficiency in body placement or range of motion. These are best determined by the Coxswain training level, instructional content and familiarity with weather, vessel, TAD and not limited to being able to define the forces of action and range of motion and the objectives of training.

This requires of Coxswains and Crew members to have professional understanding and behavioral training regarding this risk area.

Items to consider during training with a TAD:

1. Type of RWC and TAD
2. Conditions of water and weather
3. Communications between Coxswain/Crew and training goals
4. Review, correction and counseling of supervisor and/or Coxswain/crew operations
5. Speed of the craft and turning radius applied with associated weight distribution on the TAD
6. TAD connectivity

It is impossible to cover everything we would normally prescribe in our training program for student candidates. We can give you some ideas to ponder and size up against common sense and water safety. Let's dig in!

Rescue Boards rest on the top transom stern deck and centerline connection point from the bow of the Towable Aquaplane
Device (TAD-Rescue Board) is typically affixed to the RWC stern eye.

We do not add any additional hardware to the upper RWC deck due to vessel and passenger safety. We would not advise
agencies or personnel to drill holes through the RWC hull and add additional bow eyes to the top deck. Especially if
working in flood environments or drawing bodies over these areas.

These could become strike points, facial contact, create entanglement or entrapment, wrap long hair (scalping) or garments and cause breaks/fractures/amputations of fingers if rings are worn.

Port and Starboard side rescue board tether points generally are affixed to the trailer tie down eye points underneath the RWC top deck bond line. The trailer tie down eyes are actually a very strong tow point, but rarely is there direct load on these two points. Generally there is a giveway or slack and shock effect depending upon the style of board, the interface of connectivity and the amount of weight pushing downward with gravitational force.

Rescue boards are not floating per se, they are dragging, pivoting, rising and lowering. They are a towable aquaplane device that rests semi forward on the stern deck of a Rescue Water Craft.

There is a pitch upward and downward at the fulcrum point of interface between the rescue board bottom deck. There is also interface of the bow tether point that can crease the topside of the rescue board if too much force is applied or if pinned against a fixed object or rolled such as in waves. Always touch check and visibly inspect your rescue board and retire when needed.

When in a training environment we coach our students as role players to understand the risks to bodily injury using a TAD such as placing their head when lying in a prone face down position to port or starboard astern of the craft and to monitor survivors body positioning or changing positions while underway.

When underway in the same fashion changes of body position will occur with the interface between water movement and Coxswain helms control and trim. There is not a lot of deck space however we have studied the most practical methods by observing RWC, board, water and human movements and have determined that the 'dead zone' is a clear reminder for personal safety.

It's easy to say and clear to remember. This is a non-operative area. No hands should be in this area between the board and the boat, these are pinch points due to the lifting up and downward motions between the two leverage points.

This takes some time for students to incorporate into their training skillsets, this does not happen as a behavior during their first rotation. It takes many reminders and self assessment to correct and enable the safety behaviors. These corrections can be mere inches and change while underway due to vessel movement or body positioning.

It is important to consider anchor points, handheld points, foot wedges (not entrapment) and the pivot or sway of the rescue board. This does not mean they are gaining any visual capabilities. This is a measure to protect the head from either lifting and rising, or dropping and striking the ‘Dead Zone’ area in case of mishap.

There are a lot of contributing factors. Video review of incorrect and correct methods may assist you in understanding the risks and determining what would be the best course of action with the make and model of RWC and board. This is a difficult discussion to harness without proper coaching, so do not use all of this as a set in stone way of operating. There are many contributing actions that apply, such as operator and crew knowledge, Rescue Board inspection, RWC inspection and a firm understanding of the waterway you will be training and working under. And then, add pressure of a real life situation.

This is also a safety consideration during transport of survivors. Another rule we would like you to consider along with the 'dead zone' is a safe speed transport set at about 25 miles per hour. There are many technical needs, so don't fixate on just one, we teach hundreds of variations that enable the operators to select their underway options.

Don't forget that wise saying 'where the head goes the body follows'.

Use Common Sense, Evaluate, Study, Learn and Correct

REVIEW YOUR PROGRAM USE

Let's recap:

1. Do not add hardware to the RWC top deck where bodies come in contact
2. Observe the Dead Zone area astern and be mindful of points of contact
3. Safe Speeds Underway (25 mph rule), crew communicates with Coxswain is speed is determined unsafe
4. Coxswains maintain a level, steady and stable RWC at all times, Crew maintains the efficiency use of survivor loading and
underway security and secures the final stop measures
5. Observe counterbalance measures between the RWC and TAD and Persons on Board (POB).

We spend a lot of focus time to work with rescue boards to gain understanding in simple physics, vessel/board type, water dynamics and operator technical abilities. We want our Coxswains and Crew to be 100% responsible for their underway actions. We believe this is possible with a strong mindset, knowledge base and policies that work for success of the mission.

The Dead Zone is a reminder that this area is not a safe zone for us, to respect our board and rescue board use, and we must be mindful of potential impact or strike zones when operating in dynamic conditions other than calm water.

Speed is a critical component of professional marine units, safe operations mean Safe Coxswains and Crew who maintain a safe and successful program!

There are typically three ways of operations for crew to consider and train under until familiarization occurs:

1. Laying prone face down on a TAD
2. Layering weight and body positions on a TAD (multiple persons on board)
3. Kneeling-bracing position on TAD as Crew
4. Sitting position on RWC stern seat

Please consider taking a class and find out what you do not know!

It's far less expensive than the long rough road of mishap review and repair.

We hope to see you in a class!

Posted: 10.27.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

DO NOT USE HIGHLY FLAMMABLE PRODUCTS ON YOUR RWC ENGINE

Never use any type of anti corrosive spray that say ‘highly flammable’ in the Information section.

I have come across far too many of my k38 students who have been given poor advice by others.

This advise could be dangerous or even deadly.

This is why the manufacturer’s of Personal Water Craft give direct advice and guidance for the types of products
they would like clients to use. Many ignore their safety warnings and place themselves and their crews at risk for explosion or injury.

The second threat is to the exhaust cooling rubber hoses. If the hoses lost their structural integrity they will fail. This means a Rescue Water Craft can take on water suddenly and sink. This could end up as a total loss.

Your preventative sprays are to be used with a cooled engine after washing down the engine compartment or completing the fresh water rinse/flush of the exhaust cooling lines.

Pay attention to all your actions and research the information and get other opinions if you are learning.

It does not require much effort and you will do better with your program in many ways.

Shawn Alladio – 6.14.2018

Shawn cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

2018 International Rescue Water Craft Day

RWC DAY

The International Rescue Water Craft Day is an international day of observance to commemorate qualified Rescue Water Craft operators, crews, volunteers and teams.

The Rescue Water Craft Association (RWCA) established the inaugural International Rescue Water Craft Day on June 21st, 2017 and will be celebrated each subsequent year on the anniversary date.

Jet Pump

Rescue Water Craft Day

JOIN US

The promotion of the day symbolizes the dedication, service and commitment towards boating safety and lifesaving. RWCA is the lead agency coordinated events worldwide.

In 2017 the following nations observed the inaugural event by sharing awareness about RWC/PWC boating safety: USA, Poland, Chile, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Event Anniversary Date: June 21st

International Rescue Water Craft Day Motto:
International Rescue Water Craft Day Theme 2018: ‘Because We Care’

Hashtags: #IRWCD #RWCA #RescueWaterCraftDay #BecauseWeCare

Jet Pump

RWC Lifesavers

ABOUT

The International Rescue Water Craft Day is observed around the world each year on June 21st. Established in 2017 by the Rescue Water Craft Association, IRWCD provides a shared day recognizing the commitment to boating safety and to contribute to the Rescue Water Craft community a culture of safety and best practices.

PARTICIPATE

Ways to participate:

1. Post up your Rescue Water Craft Team Photos or Videos. Represent professionalism and standardization, use #IRWCD hashtags
2. Share RWCA IRWCD theme posts to social media outlets
3. Take a Rescue Water Craft boating safety course
4. Make a commitment to representing Rescue Water Craft standards both in practice and operations
5. Make a video representing your commitment to IRWCD and boating safety, post on June 21st

NORTH AMERICA
RWCA FACEBOOK

JAPAN
RWCA JAPAN FACEBOOK

LAW LOAN PROGRAM

PWC LAW LOAN PROGRAM

Yamaha and Kawasaki Public Safety Law Loan Program.

Personal Watercraft Industry Association Law Loan Program This program was set up through the PWIA for public safety agencies to receive loaner craft through participating dealerships

The following information is intended to help your agency to apply for use of Yamaha Water Vehicles in your boating related Public Safety work. The focal point of the program is the local Yamaha Dealer.

Once your documents are prepared you should contact the local Yamaha Water Vehicle dealer in your region.

They in turn will endorse the application and forward it to Yamaha Motors Corporation USA, with their approval to order the unit or units specified in your request. The exceptions to this otherwise straight forward process are the limitations of Yamaha's inventory (a seasonal consideration), and the willingness of the local Yamaha dealer whose participation is strictly voluntary.

In 2018, the PWIA Law Loan Program entered its 30th year supporting public and federal safety agencies with personal watercraft from Yamaha Motors Corporation USA, and Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA. The program began in 1989.

This program has essentially the same terms and conditions in 2012 that it had at its beginnings in 1989, when it was launched. In just the past year over 100 agencies acquired loan units through their local Kawasaki JET SKI® watercraft dealers.

K38 Training Kawasaki TS Jet Ski

CELEBRATING 30 YEARS

In the 22 years of operation, the program has loaned approximately 4000 machines to well over 700 individual agencies. The value of these loans reaches over $20 million.

This program has been a big supporter of American communities saving taxpayers monies and supporting our local law enforcement and Search and Rescue groups.

K38 has been providing Rescue Water Craft boat operations qualification training for these agencies in concert with the PWIA Law Loan Program since 1989.

K38 has assisted hundreds of public safety agencies and thousands of personnel in competency training for these unique small boats.

K38 Training Rescue Water Craft

KAWASAKI PUBLIC SAFETY LAW LOAN PROGRAM

POINTS TO COVER

1. Contact Information: Name, Address, Fax, Email, Agency Name and Contact Person

2. Contact Name and Number of the day (hours of operation) office of the day-to-day officer responsible for the loaned units

3. A brief statement regarding the proposed use or application of the vessel(s), (units)

4. A statement that the agency will be responsible for the routine maintenance and repair of the craft

5. A statement that the units will be returned in a condition of normal wear. Any damages the dealership notes beyond that will be the responsibility of the agency to repair.

6. A statement that the agency will assume all liability for the operation of the craft while in their possession.
As mentioned above, take this letter to your local Yamaha or Kawasaki Water Vehicle Dealer. They will add their endorsement and forward it to our office here in California or Georgia so the machine can be ordered once approved.

You can find a local Yamaha or Kawasaki dealer through their respective websites. Use your area code to conduct a search.

With the recent economic downturn many local dealerships have moved or closed, or perhaps are not participating on the law loan program. You will have to be assertive in your search if your local dealership has closed.

You do not have to stay within your city, you can roam for other surrounding areas to contact dealerships. A dealership will only have so many units available for the program.

POINTS TO COVER

1. Contact Information: Name, Address, Fax, Email, Agency Name and Contact Person

2. Contact Name and Number of the day (hours of operation) office of the day-to-day officer responsible for the loaned units

3. A brief statement regarding the proposed use or application of the vessel(s), (units)

4. A statement that the agency will be responsible for the routine maintenance and repair of the craft

5. A statement that the units will be returned in a condition of normal wear. Any damages the dealership notes beyond that will be the responsibility of the agency to repair.

6. A statement that the agency will assume all liability for the operation of the craft while in their possession.
As mentioned above, take this letter to your local Yamaha or Kawasaki Water Vehicle Dealer. They will add their endorsement and forward it to our office here in California or Georgia so the machine can be ordered once approved.

You can find a local Yamaha or Kawasaki dealer through their respective websites. Use your area code to conduct a search.

With the recent economic downturn many local dealerships have moved or closed, or perhaps are not participating on the law loan program. You will have to be assertive in your search if your local dealership has closed.

You do not have to stay within your city, you can roam for other surrounding areas to contact dealerships. A dealership will only have so many units available for the program.

K38 RECOMMENDS: THINGS TO KNOW IN ADVANCE

Good thing you are reading this! I am going to save you frustration and give you what you need:

PERSPECTIVE

1. Trailers are not included, you will need to supply your own transportation and tie downs

2. You will need to supply additional lanyards for each person on your team and replace them if worn or damaged. If you have a Bombardier, Sea Doo, you will need to have each digital lanyard coded alike off their MPEM program so your lanyards can be keyed the same. Digital keys and lanyards are not interchangeable! If you lose or break them you will not be able to start your craft.

3. Bathing suits are not to be worn, your crew must be wearing full PPE protection, and a USCG approved lifejacket, properly fitted and sized

4. Enter into effective dialogue with your loaner dealership. Do not make any make any
assumptions. Your department is held responsible for any damages to the craft upon return. Put aside an amount of money for repairs or maintenance for your program.

5. Depending upon the make, model, year and agreement, your watercraft will need a tune-up and oil change every 30-50 hours of use. (Oil filter, spark plugs, oil change)

6. Your team will need to understand how to maintain and care for craft.

7. Keep hourly logs on the boats so you can keep your maintenance hours in check.

8. Your operators need to be physically fit. This is an active ride.

9. Your operators need to know how to swim and should be evaluated wearing their full PPE kit

10. Your operators need to have their basic boating skills and current credentials in order. Our K38/NASBLA/NSBC instruction program endorses certification for a period of three years upon expiration. This is a boating standard. No exemptions! Equipment, laws, rules and regulations change, you must stay current with all your operational needs

PWC Manufacturers
1. BRP Sea Doo
2. Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA
3. Yamaha Motors Corporation USA

ABOUT PWIA

Personal Watercraft Industry Association (PWIA) represents U.S. personal watercraft manufacturers. Founded in 1987, the organization was created to promote the safe and responsible operation of personal watercraft. PWIA provides a unified voice for the segment, and represents the interests of personal watercraft manufacturers in legislative and regulatory concerns.

Content Creator - Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.