If rescued by a Rescue Water Craft during a flood, what should you do?

Keep Thinking-Keep Moving

Flood Rescue using Personal Water Craft (PWC)

Oftentimes people will be recovered by citizens who own a PWC during flood events. Why is that?

Because most often in widespread disasters we are on our own and we help one another. There may not be organized rescue for a few days.

These images below are from Japan in November 2018 during severe flooding the nation experienced. It's not the first time Japanese have used Personal Water Craft for evacuations. During the Tohoku tsunami of 3.11.2011 Mr. Imazaki rescued over 100 persons in extremely dangerous freezing conditions at night.

Masayuki Imazaki

Wake of Fame Inductee: Phoenix Award

The 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami PWC Rescues (東日本大震災, Higashi Nihon Daishinsai)

PWC Operator: Mr. Imazaki, 40 years of age, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan

Owner: Higashi Nippon Marina – PWC Dealer ‘Marine Mechanic’

They represent our 'Everyday Heroes' conducting rescues of their neighbors. This is an experience occurring around the world as floods are the number one reason people drown worldwide, and a Personal Water Craft is one of many small craft that assist during the critical and initial food stage.

When you look at this images study them. Learn from them. Try to place yourself on that roof, or on that shoreline.

What do you need to know if you are in a flood and a person brings a Personal Water Craft (PWC) to you to evacuate from?

Watch out for wakes and the water jet pump

This is not training per-se, but an awareness article, something to think about. You could possibly apply this to other vessels as well.

This is a problem for us, having this kind of discussion is rarely a topic of anyone’s top ten list but we have to go here. K38 wishes that you adopt your own 'Safety Behavior' for yourself and your loved ones by being educated in advance of water disaster such as flood, earthquake-tsunami or storm surge.

EDUCATION SAVES LIVES

Did you know we host along with the Rescue Water Craft Association a Disaster Preparedness Education Group on Facebook?

Here is a link to the group, you may be interested in the outstanding educational editorial posted, visit the UNITS section: Disaster Preparedness Education Group

I am going to share with your potential issues or concerns from the perspective of an evacuee.

I’m not going to share with you the thousands of successful flood rescue recoveries conducted by citizens who have no water rescue training. They may not have professional training but they are doing great work and we are very proud of their efforts!

These are very good craft to use because of their shallow draft, which means they can operate in shallow waters. As long as there is no underwater hazards, these are great power boats for confined spaces.

They can also navigate in close or confined quarters (tight spaces). They are a great ‘point of contact’ craft. However debris can be a problem as well as strong currents, or capsizing due to lack of effective balance.

I would encourage you first to ask of the Personal Water Craft operator who is responding to your situation effective questions about how you will be transported and what to expect in case of an emergency. Make a plan first!

Remember this boat does not have a lot of room for bringing on a lot of personal items. Those would be best stowed in a towed vessel astern (behind) the Personal Water Craft if there is one, use it.

You probably will not be dry, meaning that it could be raining, your feet will get wet (pants), and you will experience spray from moving forward. You must consider the wind chill effect as well when underway, you may find yourself colder than when you started.

You can drop things and lose them in the water as well, so hold onto and secure your personal items.

Be careful of electrical lines

Be exceptionally aware of downed utility or power lines, you do not want to experience shock or electrical burns. Be careful of your surroundings and what you touch.

It may be difficult to hear, so you may have to talk loudly or yell to communicate.

TRANSPORT WEIGHT

There are probably 2 types of Personal Water Craft that citizens will use:

1. Sport - Capacity: 1 to 2 persons on board
2. Runabout - Capacity: 1 to 3 persons on board

*. Runabouts can also have a Rescue Board attached to the stern if its a volunteer Search and Rescue Group or public safety agency, oftentimes these are the color yellow but not always.

Both of these Personal Water Craft have what is called 'weight load limits'. These are set by the weight on board and can be somewhat rated by adding together the total human weight but not to exceed it for calm conditions. Obviously the more stable craft will be a three-seater type craft we call a 'Runabout'.

You can tell this by the way the seating looks on the Personal Water Craft. Do you see that three people can sit down?

How do you hold on? You can hold onto the waist of the operator in front of you, or onto a strap on the back of their lifejacket. But do not tug them, they can lose their balance.

Some models have a seat strap that goes across the front seat area.

Some models have hand held finger grasp imprints along the plastic that is the re-boarding handle. See if you can identify any of these areas to use for stabilizing your position on the craft.

Your feet should remain in the footwell areas while you are facing forward in a seated position. Do not stand up underway! Falls overboard can occur.

When re-boarding be mindful that some of these craft do not have a neutral position but will be in idle moving forward from 2 to 4 miles per hour.

Some of these models may have a retractable re-boarding step below the molding on the deck area, near where the directional steering nozzle is at the back of the craft below the waterline. You can see if there is one or ask the operator, you can feel for it and pull it downward to get your knee onto it, but be mindful it can retract back into its resting position when released.

Use due caution when loading on a Personal Water Craft (PWC)

Moving pets is a different topic altogether, use common sense and be careful!

Sometimes you will see a rescue board, that is a flat device that is on the stern of the craft to the waterline. It is secured with 3 tie downs to the stern (back) of the Personal Water Craft. You may be asked to lay flat, hold onto the front handles and watch out for spray in your face.

You can expect to get wet and you will have water wash over the rescue board and it may be spraying in your face, so we advise you to be cautious of this during flood events. (Again we prefer to not to use a rescue board in flood stages professionally, except for small livestock and pets).

It is best if you do not stay near the waterline, because of debris, contaminants, cold, and fixed objects underwater. It is better if you can be up on the rear seat behind the Personal Water Craft (PWC) Operator. This means that the craft will be less stable with a higher center of gravity from body positioning however. The rescue board can be used as a ramp to help guide you towards the seat.

RESCUE BOARD POSITIONS

1. Kneeling on the Rescue Board
2. Laying Face Down on the Rescue Board

Oftentimes people sit upright on a rescue board. This is less centered balance, especially if you are near the back of or the end of the board. Keep your body forward and place a hand on the re-boarding handle behind the back seat to steady yourself.

If you have an operator who applies sudden throttle to the helm, you may experience a sharp 'lurch' forward or to the sides, hold on tight as this can set you off balance and back into the water. Take your safety seriously when using a rescue board, you do not want to fall backwards. Be mindful of hair or loose clothing wrapping on the handles.

The Rescue Board can slip below the surface at the midpoint, but it is connected to the stern cleat of the Personal Water Craft (PWC). This makes it a bit awkward to board until you get closer towards the back of the PWC, then the board will rise towards the surface but that back end will still be below the surface as it is dragged forward.

Think of the Rescue Board as two distinct halves. The strongest point for you is closer to the back of the Personal Water Craft. No matter what make sure your pelvis is above the back of the rescue board and not dragging in the water.

Also you may need to coax and assist others with boarding, so pay attention to additional weight changes.

Rescue Board

You can also hold your legs up from the knees when laying flat as they can trail in the jet thrust and pull your shoes off, especially if you have loose fitting shoes. Stay centered on the rescue board and hold on to the top two forward handles you will be looking at.

Do not hold onto the center line attached to the Personal Water Craft. Do not hold onto the re-boarding handle if you are laying face down on the board. Simply hold on with both hands, keep a watch and stay alert for the water conditions underway.

Watch where you place your fingers, you don't want them to get pinned, pinched or smashed especially if you are wearing rings on your fingers, remember the Rescue Board pivots and moves, this means you may lose your grip or find that you are not holding onto a safe area, think about where your hands are and reconsider positioning.

Towing a boat with Survivors behind a Personal Water Craft

Sometimes a rescue board is not used for transporting survivors but a boat is being towed behind it where people are placed. The same principles apply, set your body position in a stable part of the towed boat and find a seated position and observe for safety issues ahead while underway. Keep a watch on the boat you are on, look for any water pooling in the bottom by your feet or how high the water is to the side of the boat.

Oftentimes boats are overloaded due to the emergency and not having effective training as volunteers. Question the safety and ask the operator to make a second trip if you believe its unsafe to continue. Remember, you can communicate your concerns!

SITUATIONAL AWARENESS

It is desirable if the Personal Water Craft operator maintains a level, steady and stable PWC for you while maneuvering to a safe landing, but this may not be the case with untrained volunteers. You may find yourself back in the water in a worse situation than you were in, so think along the route about the hazards, trust your instinct!
You may notice depending upon the currents and speed of the Personal Water Craft some shifting of the towed boat taking place.

Always maintain a watch! You may find that you have to help out sometime.

It is most important to realize when the PWC begins to slow down that you need to start counterbalancing, as the stern wake catches up the PWC can start to roll slightly. Usually the PWC flips because the operator is unaware of this action as well as passengers. You may have to conduct slight counter balance measures to assist.

Two Persons laying flat, side by side, holding forward 2 handles

The most important thing for you is when the Personal Water Craft stops. How to get off? Wait for the Operator to bring the Personal Water Craft to a complete stop first. Observe what is ahead of you and start to prepare for your exit.

Its easier to get off by climbing off the back, from the seat. It is the most stable part of the craft. If you exit from the right (starboard side) or the left (port side) you will discover that the Personal Water Craft will pitch or roll off its centerline which is the most stable part of the craft. If you have been sitting on the seat you will notice this.

Forward propulsion stabilizes the PWC, so when it is stopped you can expect increased motion from the craft, counter balance.

Be careful stepping off! You don't know what you are stepping onto, make sure your have good foot contact so you don't roll your ankle in soft mud or dirt or get tripped on debris. Plant one foot at a time and maintain your balance during each step.

Take your time and go slow. Don't be nervous, focus on your surroundings. You don’t know what you will be stepping on, so get a firm foot down first. Don't let your ankle roll or jump or dive off. Remember the Personal Water Craft moves a lot, so prepare yourself for that, its a very small craft.

Never lock your knees or arms when riding, unless you have an injury.

Loading from a roof line can be dangerous, slow down and take your time!

Safety is a Behavior

If you have the ability to put on a lifejacket that is even better! (Or have some type of flotation with you if you are not a strong swimmer). Do so immediately and properly secure all the buckles for a good fit. If you have children with you take care of them first.

Remember an adult lifejacket may not be the best measure for small children, they can slip out of them due to inadequate sizing! Let the children know verbally what is happening so they are not scared, give them key information to help them deal with the situation and tell them if they fall overboard to go into a 'floating position' or to swim towards shore, or if the PWC capsizes to 'stay with the PWC'.

If you have brought a small pet with you, be mindful of their behavior. They may be distressed and want to bite at others. Make sure you have secured them with a collar, leash, muzzle or a very firm grip. Remember, pets are protective and may not respond to people helping them positively especially a uniformed person.

If you are bringing any electronics such as a smart phone, be mindful this is a wet ride and items easily fall overboard or out of pockets and you will get wet or lose them!

If you have been a witness to a drowning or lost a loved one, pet or livestock, you will have to hold on a little longer till you get to a safe area. It will be important for you to seek help and to talk about the experience at some point. Evacuations are a long process of loss to many degrees.

At this critical time, 'Life and Safety' are most critical and should be your primary concerns.

Once safe, everything else can be dealt with, but first its imperative to get you out of a risk zone and to a safe zone.

EMERGENCY
If you experience a problem underway, such as the water jet pump being fouled with debris, or the PWC capsizes or you fall off the PWC, you can do something to help yourself and others. But first discuss it before your board a vessel!

If the Personal Water Craft capsizes remain calm! Tell yourself not to panic or be afraid. Especially if you do not have a fastened lifejacket. What you do next is vital.

Since you have been observing for hazards you already know where the currents are going and any downstream or upstream or surrounding hazards, you may have to start swimming away from objects if you are going to drift into them.

These may be called strainers and they can be deadly. A strainer is a fixed object that water can pass through but objects get pinned against them.

If you are not taking care of small children or pets, immediately when you surface roll onto your back and float face upward to the sky, and relax and breathe.

Get control of your thoughts and take a look around for safe landings or objects to grab onto. You may have to help the Personal Water Craft operator to right their capsized PWC. It's not hard to do! The sooner the PWC gets righted the sooner you will reach safety.

Re-boarding from the water line can be exhausting. Take it slow and counter balance. If you focus it will be easier to determine what needs to be done and you will do great!

Righting a Capsized Boat

1. You will see an intake with metal bars on it, that's the water intake screen. Place your fingers on the outside of the bars and start to pull the PWC towards you. You can also place a knee up on the edge of the capsized PWC, and give it a few tugs!

2. Once the PWC starts to roll over, it will settle in an upright position. For four stroke engines we wait 10 seconds till we restart, but if the PWC is upside for over two minutes it becomes more difficult and the engine compartment can start seeping water making it heavier than usual.

3. The Engine Cut Off Switch will be needed to re-start the craft, the operator should have this, but they can break or float away. If using a Kawasaki Ultra model, open the glove box below the helm and remove the immobilizer key and re-key it to start. You will hear a chirping sound.

4. Re-board the craft from the back stern deck, not the sides. Stabilize and take your time. Observe for hazards you may be floating towards.

You will need the engine cut off switch to restart the engine. If you are on a BRP Sea Doo the engine cut off switch on newer models is digitally coded, as are the Kawasaki Ultra models immobilizer key. Keep all electronics away from these!

Follow the diagram on the stern of the PWC (If it has not been removed)

UITEMATE

If you find yourself in the water, a simple technique of floating will help you and others! Do not panic! Learn how to float on your back using the Uitemate technique from Japan.

Uitemate

Japanese technique "uitemate" on preventing drowning

Uitemate Method

When you get closer to a landing area, start to think ahead of what you need to do and be mindful of. Allow the Personal Water Craft operator to complete their final maneuvering. Continue to counter balance.

You may find that your legs have gone to sleep in a strange position or the cold has caught up to you. Take your time moving and getting off the Personal Water Craft.

Be mindful of the soil or area your feet will make contact with. Do not dive. Do not jump! Place your feet down slowly and firmly. You do not want to roll an ankle or trip and fall into the water.

If you can and are physically able, assist others from disembarking.

If you have any open cuts or wounds, you may need to get them cleaned out from contact with the water.

Now its time to get ready for your next evacuation plan, a shelter or a staging area or counseling!

Hopefully you never have this experience but these are some of the items I would like you to be aware of so you don’t experience any fear, frustration or worry. Better to know something than to know nothing at all.

Thanks for your time! Ask any questions you may have!

Special thanks to our Everyday Heroes in these photos. I am sending all my best thoughts to the responders in Japan, please join me!

Special thanks to this blog post: http://netgeek.biz/archives/122152

_________________
Posted 11.25.2018

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

A Moment for Safety

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED!

When you have accomplished your mission you know you are paying attention to risk!

Do not be afraid to fail, that is what training is about. Its actually required unless you already know the content.

But for the first time learner an effective instructor will translate to the student the best measures to approach the problem with credible solutions.

The mission is delivered when there are no mishaps, the operations are based on technical boating, proper PPE is assigned, and training is documented along with the program needs. If this is not taking place, stop and restart the program before a mishap occurs.

Successful mission outcomes are great, but it comes with a heft investment of time, personnel and funding.

Updates cannot happen within an agency, they must come from those who are in the field and discovering content, creating content, testing the content, measuring the content and delivering the content. This is what qualified instructors bring to an agency versus a 'train the trainer' format that weakens the foundation strength.

It's been proven that intellectual knowledge is delivered from subject matter experts. Most training programs do not maintain or reach their potential due to downsizing the curriculum to save time. Those agencies should not have a Rescue Water Craft marine unit. Maintaining a boat unit is an expansive responsibility.

Oftentimes agencies treat the Rescue Water Craft program as a rescue asset instead of a boat asset. The two are in conflict with on another. Boating must come first, rescue is the final application.

Students must want to learn and content must be updated annually for this to happen.

How do you rank?

Your must evaluate your training program. You need a baseline measure to compare the success from failure.

Ask yourself these questions:

1. Do you have the proper fitted and sized PPE?
2. Do you evaluate physical fitness levels and how often?
3. Are your checklists signed off by the individual who tasks the assignment?
4. Are your RWC's pulled out of service when there is questionable operational behaviors?
5. Are your rescue boards inspected?
6. Trailer inspection list, how often?
7. Weather and water conditions listed in training logs?
8. Individual training logs and results maintained.
9. Equipment is retired according to use and wear and manufacturer recommendations.
10. Is your team certification current and valid for 3 years?
11. Do you review your curriculum annually?
12. Has each team member read the manufacturers Owners Manual?
13. Does each team member hold a current valid Boat operators license or permit?
14. Do your team members know how to swim in the water you train in?

1 to 4 - AT RISK

5 to 8 - NEEDS IMPROVEMENT

9 to 12 - SECURE

Rescue Board Training and Inspection

CORRECTIONS

Any of the questions above that were not checked are the ones you need to focus on.

You can revise your program internally or hire a subject matter consultant. We can help you with that.

We have created hundreds of solutions for clients who knew their program was at risk. It's easy to correct. Don't let your program suffer or open up bigger problems down the line. Consider making your own program evaluation and presenting it to your
administration for review. Then tackle those concerns head on.

It's better to effect change before problems occur rather than when a mishap occurs. They can be costly in resource loss, out of service and injury recovery time due to loss of work for individuals.

Thank you for taking the short quiz and for caring about your Marine Unit.

Remember this: A moment for safety can save a lifetime of regret.
_______________________________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

WHAT IS YOUR CURRENT PROGRAM STATUS?

CHECK!

Program status matters! It's how you ensure reputation and efficiency.

As a qualified Rescue Water Craft Coxswain what are your operational responsibilities?
They are a composite of equipment and personnel needs.


Ask yourself how many of these are incorporated in your Rescue Water Craft Program?
Let’s survey now! Select the number of program plans you already have in effect:

1. Rescue Water Craft Maintenance Records
2. Training Records
3. Inspection Records
4. Certifications, Re-certifications (Physical standard requirements)
5. Incident Histories
6. Mishap Reviews
7. Dated Revisions
8. Weather/Environmental Notes
9. Training Videos
10. PPE Records
11. TAD Records
12. Trailer Inspection Records

How do you rank?

1 to 4 - AT RISK

5 to 8 - NEEDS IMPROVEMENT

9 to 12 - SECURE

Rescue Board Training and Inspection

MANAGEMENT

It is a significant responsibility to maintain a professional marine RWC unit. It requires first of all a proper budget. Second effect training for the areas of response. Thirdly it requires inspection, maintenance and updates.

If you scored below 9 as a minimum it’s time to get to work! Make a list of the areas you need support in. If you need your program reviewed, we can assist you with that. Programs should be reviewed every three years, and assessed annually.

We wish you a safe and secure season and we know you care about your program or you wouldn’t be reading this story. You are the direct link to your team’s safety and public confidence, we are glad you are in our community. Let’s get to work!

_______________________________

Have any questions? Join the Rescue Water Craft Association
and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!
Join the Rescue Water Craft Association

Content Creator: Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

RESCUE WATER CRAFT BATTERY ISSUES

MELTDOWN

RESCUE WATER CRAFT BATTERY ISSUES

Rescue Water Craft batteries require your constant attention. Battery inspection needs to be a daily feature in your pre and post operations inspection.

It is only avoidable if there is knowledge. So now in the aftermath of discovery it is avoidable if the knowledge is retained. Before this it is just 'learning'.

That's a dead short you are looking at in the images above. It is the result of way too much current flow. How do you know that? The posts are molten where your cables would have been connected. That is one way to explode a battery, and could become a very dangerous situation quickly.

The Rescue Water Craft fuses should have helped to prevent an explosion. It would be important in these instances to inspect your fuses ASAP.

First off you need to refer to the make, model and year of production of your Rescue Water Craft and adhere to the manufacturer’s recommendations.

Questions
Is there too much slack in the lead wires or the battery strap harness inside the RWC while operating with this battery?

Is it missing the traction pad below it rests on? Is it the right type of battery?

Did this happen inside the Rescue Water Craft or was the battery brand new and being charged for use?

Jet Pump

Yuasa Battery

LOOSEY GOOSEY

Loose battery connections on the lead cables create resistance and turn into ‘heat’. If the cable was not tightened enough it could create resistance for the battery when it tries to bridge the gap and arcs with a high heat. There should be no white powder on the terminals and they should not move when touched and tugged to see if the posts swivel or move.

Tight terminals are a must, as are using an inspection daily check list post and pre-ops. Be consistent, its a bad deal when problems come your way when you are out on the water. It's better to catch them while the RWC is on the trailer. Don't splash your RWC until you are 100% seaworthy.

HINT: do not use a screwdriver, use a ratchet with a properly sized socket to adjust the Pos/Neg cables!

With a loose connection the wires which are small and the load is high, what does that mean? If a battery is loose inside a Rescue Water Craft, such as the straps are connected improperly or using the wrong strap sizes or one broke free or the battery size is wrong and does not fit into the stock tray, problems are imminent.

Take a close look at the battery tray location. Does your battery shape fit fully in the tray? If not, consider heading back to a stock battery, saving money is not gonna happen in this situation.

If the battery is the right size the straps may be problematic. Friction and movement of the battery can be an issue causing the wire connections to crack or fracture and this is the kind of a situation that can cause sparks. If the battery is bouncing around those sparks are like the same heat as an arc welder. A bad situation is at hand and fully preventable.

Or you could have a short inside the battery. Even a partial short and/or poor connection on the terminals can create significant problems. In these images it looks like the pos side had a meltdown.

This kind of a situation can create other problems such as the relay or starter motor engine could have experienced damage.

Jet Pump

Vents and Distilled Water

JUICED

Never jump a Rescue Water Craft from another running vehicle or charger, it will feed more amps into the system and can damage or destroy the MPEM or ECU units.

Also if jumping the battery, make sure you are using the right size cables, you need the smaller cables, larger ones will not correlate with the proper amperage, and would be a wasted attempt.

I would definitely inspect the fuse and the leads pos/neg cables for rust or corrosion. Sometimes this happens when people jump their RWC batteries off a vehicle that is running, which should NEVER be done. Our Rescue Water Craft are not set up to run the amps and voltage beyond 2.5 amps in their system, this can be very destructive.

There is not much difference in voltage between a nearly full battery and a depleted one, its less than 1.0 volts. If the RWC engine is running the charging system makes an attempt to maintain a specific voltage output to the battery. This depends upon the battery ability to absorb the charge translated as Amps and the charging system delivery of the full current the battery demands.

There is a lot of demand placed on a battery and its electrical partners; from the voltage, charging, stator alternator, solenoid and starter. Never jump your battery from a vehicle, you will overcharge the system. Stay under 2 amps while charging your battery.

A solenoid is an electrical switch which causes electrical contact from the starter circuit to ground power the coil and can handle the high voltage for the starter which begins the rotation of the motor. Solenoids make a distinct click sound. If you are jumping the battery and the solenoid cranks poorly then it’s not the solenoid, it could be just a bad connection.

You can check with a volt meter on the posts to get a reading. Then press the ‘start’ button and note if the voltage is lower. It may be a weak battery.

It is important to remember to protect the electrical system and the battery by not holding down the start button longer than 5 seconds and waiting 15 seconds prior to the next start.

Frequent starts will engage a quick shut down cycle on the battery if the engine cannot run. You don’t want to burn out your starter motor. Patience goes a long way and will help you understand the temperament of your RWC electrical system.

Don’t rush, take your time to troubleshoot and be patient.

Jet Pump

Waterproof Battery Tender

VOLTAGE

When the battery voltage drops low it’s time for a new battery. It is also possible to purchase a new battery that was not fully charged and it drops its voltage and becomes worthless pretty fast, requiring another new fully charged battery.

It is important to follow the directions for using the appropriate battery charger that can fully charge a new battery. Many times people do not follow suit properly and they waste time and money.

Waterproof battery tenders are often used for long time storage to help protect battery life. For some watercraft there are other contributing factors it could be a bad DESS key for a BRP Sea Doo as well. A simple replacement of the DESS key and coding might be the answer.

Always check a battery on a multi meter to see what the voltage level is. Make sure you are using the right battery that is recommended by the OEM manufacturer as well. Low voltage can be really bad for electronics and relays. Good batteries should be 12.3-12.5 volts but refer to your RWC brand to be specific.

Cheap batteries yield cheaper results and some of the batteries like Yuasa require a special charger to load the batteries, so that can be problematic and not getting a full charge. Use dieletric grease on the terminals in the future, you will be glad you did.

Rescue Water Craft batteries work best when the charge is maintained. Maintenance free batteries are highly recommended. Batteries get hot when working hard, so don’t overload the amperage by adding accessories to the craft that need an electrical draw.

Answer: Tight connections and Clean Cables are required, good straps and the appropriate fully charged battery. This was a brand new battery in the images above being charged.

Recap:
1. Bad Battery Sealed or Cell, gel cells or AGM (vented or not vented) Wet cell batteries need distilled water.
2. Poor Battery Connection-Partial short
3. Wrong Battery Used
4. DESS post failing (inductive arcing)
5. Fast Charged Battery
6. Inspect Fuse Box

This is not a tutorial, it’s a basic Q & A regarding battery connectivity. Take your RWC to a qualified mechanic for servicing and follow basic preventative maintenance schedules to ensure the longevity of your operations and underway safety.

Content Creator - Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

LAW LOAN PROGRAM

PWC LAW LOAN PROGRAM

Yamaha and Kawasaki Public Safety Law Loan Program.

Personal Watercraft Industry Association Law Loan Program This program was set up through the PWIA for public safety agencies to receive loaner craft through participating dealerships

The following information is intended to help your agency to apply for use of Yamaha Water Vehicles in your boating related Public Safety work. The focal point of the program is the local Yamaha Dealer.

Once your documents are prepared you should contact the local Yamaha Water Vehicle dealer in your region.

They in turn will endorse the application and forward it to Yamaha Motors Corporation USA, with their approval to order the unit or units specified in your request. The exceptions to this otherwise straight forward process are the limitations of Yamaha's inventory (a seasonal consideration), and the willingness of the local Yamaha dealer whose participation is strictly voluntary.

In 2018, the PWIA Law Loan Program entered its 30th year supporting public and federal safety agencies with personal watercraft from Yamaha Motors Corporation USA, and Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA. The program began in 1989.

This program has essentially the same terms and conditions in 2012 that it had at its beginnings in 1989, when it was launched. In just the past year over 100 agencies acquired loan units through their local Kawasaki JET SKI® watercraft dealers.

K38 Training Kawasaki TS Jet Ski

CELEBRATING 30 YEARS

In the 22 years of operation, the program has loaned approximately 4000 machines to well over 700 individual agencies. The value of these loans reaches over $20 million.

This program has been a big supporter of American communities saving taxpayers monies and supporting our local law enforcement and Search and Rescue groups.

K38 has been providing Rescue Water Craft boat operations qualification training for these agencies in concert with the PWIA Law Loan Program since 1989.

K38 has assisted hundreds of public safety agencies and thousands of personnel in competency training for these unique small boats.

K38 Training Rescue Water Craft

KAWASAKI PUBLIC SAFETY LAW LOAN PROGRAM

POINTS TO COVER

1. Contact Information: Name, Address, Fax, Email, Agency Name and Contact Person

2. Contact Name and Number of the day (hours of operation) office of the day-to-day officer responsible for the loaned units

3. A brief statement regarding the proposed use or application of the vessel(s), (units)

4. A statement that the agency will be responsible for the routine maintenance and repair of the craft

5. A statement that the units will be returned in a condition of normal wear. Any damages the dealership notes beyond that will be the responsibility of the agency to repair.

6. A statement that the agency will assume all liability for the operation of the craft while in their possession.
As mentioned above, take this letter to your local Yamaha or Kawasaki Water Vehicle Dealer. They will add their endorsement and forward it to our office here in California or Georgia so the machine can be ordered once approved.

You can find a local Yamaha or Kawasaki dealer through their respective websites. Use your area code to conduct a search.

With the recent economic downturn many local dealerships have moved or closed, or perhaps are not participating on the law loan program. You will have to be assertive in your search if your local dealership has closed.

You do not have to stay within your city, you can roam for other surrounding areas to contact dealerships. A dealership will only have so many units available for the program.

POINTS TO COVER

1. Contact Information: Name, Address, Fax, Email, Agency Name and Contact Person

2. Contact Name and Number of the day (hours of operation) office of the day-to-day officer responsible for the loaned units

3. A brief statement regarding the proposed use or application of the vessel(s), (units)

4. A statement that the agency will be responsible for the routine maintenance and repair of the craft

5. A statement that the units will be returned in a condition of normal wear. Any damages the dealership notes beyond that will be the responsibility of the agency to repair.

6. A statement that the agency will assume all liability for the operation of the craft while in their possession.
As mentioned above, take this letter to your local Yamaha or Kawasaki Water Vehicle Dealer. They will add their endorsement and forward it to our office here in California or Georgia so the machine can be ordered once approved.

You can find a local Yamaha or Kawasaki dealer through their respective websites. Use your area code to conduct a search.

With the recent economic downturn many local dealerships have moved or closed, or perhaps are not participating on the law loan program. You will have to be assertive in your search if your local dealership has closed.

You do not have to stay within your city, you can roam for other surrounding areas to contact dealerships. A dealership will only have so many units available for the program.

K38 RECOMMENDS: THINGS TO KNOW IN ADVANCE

Good thing you are reading this! I am going to save you frustration and give you what you need:

PERSPECTIVE

1. Trailers are not included, you will need to supply your own transportation and tie downs

2. You will need to supply additional lanyards for each person on your team and replace them if worn or damaged. If you have a Bombardier, Sea Doo, you will need to have each digital lanyard coded alike off their MPEM program so your lanyards can be keyed the same. Digital keys and lanyards are not interchangeable! If you lose or break them you will not be able to start your craft.

3. Bathing suits are not to be worn, your crew must be wearing full PPE protection, and a USCG approved lifejacket, properly fitted and sized

4. Enter into effective dialogue with your loaner dealership. Do not make any make any
assumptions. Your department is held responsible for any damages to the craft upon return. Put aside an amount of money for repairs or maintenance for your program.

5. Depending upon the make, model, year and agreement, your watercraft will need a tune-up and oil change every 30-50 hours of use. (Oil filter, spark plugs, oil change)

6. Your team will need to understand how to maintain and care for craft.

7. Keep hourly logs on the boats so you can keep your maintenance hours in check.

8. Your operators need to be physically fit. This is an active ride.

9. Your operators need to know how to swim and should be evaluated wearing their full PPE kit

10. Your operators need to have their basic boating skills and current credentials in order. Our K38/NASBLA/NSBC instruction program endorses certification for a period of three years upon expiration. This is a boating standard. No exemptions! Equipment, laws, rules and regulations change, you must stay current with all your operational needs

PWC Manufacturers
1. BRP Sea Doo
2. Kawasaki Motors Corporation USA
3. Yamaha Motors Corporation USA

ABOUT PWIA

Personal Watercraft Industry Association (PWIA) represents U.S. personal watercraft manufacturers. Founded in 1987, the organization was created to promote the safe and responsible operation of personal watercraft. PWIA provides a unified voice for the segment, and represents the interests of personal watercraft manufacturers in legislative and regulatory concerns.

Content Creator - Shawn Alladio cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.