We Don’t Give Medals for Mishaps

Accidents are not opportunities to draw praise, but an opportunity to correct and amend.

Mishaps are not for issuing medals and congratulations.

They are a great opportunity to make corrections from the current negligence and prevent death in the future of your team or those you are serving.

This is a serious reprimand for everyone who praises a mishap and encourages Coxswains or Crew to fail.

Why would you want your fellow sister or brother in the RWC world to fail, get hurt, or die?

Think about it.

Modify your own behavior and do not become corrupt. It’s easy to do when people are attracted to crashes.

Fear a mishap so you can learn to respect life itself and to support the mission and goals of boating safety.

Admit mistakes, make corrections before its too late.

Admit the problems, if you don’t know you have any, get your training assessed by an outside SME

1. Research solutions and corrections, find a mentor

2. Test the methods, observe the results

3. Determine the results of change from start to finish.

Do this now, not later.

Our maritime community is a collective internationally of those who practice safe boating and enforce it.

Otherwise, they are not part of the Maritime community.

Remember to fear an accident, you must respect it.

Boating Safety is Accident Prevention!

OPEN

CONCEPTUAL THINKING

Before setting out for your training, think of the goals you are aiming for.

It's a good idea to have a firm grasp on your target.

Think of three important operations that will matter most to your outreach.

Make sure the first one is a fundamental operation.

Give it your best and your time, don't skirt that one!

TRIALS

The best way to map your training out is to look at your program mission.

Do your goal work in the scope of your region?

Are they complimentary to the Rescue Water Craft you are using?

Be critical in this phase.

What you design in training is the operational goal when the call comes in.

Make sure you are not wasting gas, but training with purpose.

THE TEAM

Your team should be your 'devil's advocate.

Hash out any potential issues.

Write them down and identify corrective measures.

Your planning strategy has the ability to hone the results rather than heading to the water and figuring it out.

Remember, thinking like a survivor, act like a Coxswain.

We have discovered it takes about 85% background work to attain that 15% on water time.

That may help you with your timelines.

When you are do, conduct thorough examination of the results.

Where did you improve?

When you get to that point, its back to planning again for the next training session!

Good luck friends!

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Posted: February 4, 2020

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Visit page terms and conditions. Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

NOVEL RESCUE WATER CRAFT TRAINING

CONCEPTS OF DESIGN

It sure wasn’t easy to create Rescue Water Craft training for our maritime community. But it also wasn’t hard because we put in a lot of effort.

We knew the folks who brought the product to fruition. These were chain reaction effects.

We paid attention, and listened to our mentors. We studied, we studied mishaps, history and listened to instructors and associates.

We trained and traveled, build boats and tested equipment, we went all over the world, we chased storms and big waves and worked disasters.

To create Rescue Water Craft training we had to come up with a new schema that did not exist before, why?

When this new small power boat was created; the Jet Ski®, we understood the risk, we knew the accident behavior, we lived it and we raced with those risks. t continue we focused on what every motorized culture did, we created the safety mindset.

That safety culture has saved lives and protected reputations and departments from disaster.

K38 training in itself is Novel due to this product and we were created programs to serve the need and further propel the positive use, and we have achieved this in partnership with thousands of others.

We did not do this alone.

THE JET SKI CREATED THE PATH

It was the beginning of a new era of boating safety pursuits back in the 1970s. The changes in the product lines determined operator behaviors that were not always positive.

It was apparent we would focus on behavioral training and occupational enforcement of those actions. We also lined up with boating safety and the actions that would work with these boat characteristics.

It has not been easy, but we are still here focused on the mission to rev-olutionize lifesaving worldwide using these unique boats.

Working hard is not the entire solution. Being smart is part of it to a small degree of the distribution, but that is really a collective responsibility. It is about a team effort and having true content, consistency and modernization.

There are casual sequences of opportunity within our training hierarchy worldwide. Credit doesn’t always extend to those who are smart, hard-working, the creators, good imitators or bad ones.

The credit goes to the survivors of mishaps who have been positively recovered without additional duress exerted by the responders.

Basically, when instructing, the goals are to enhance the abilities of others and make sure those facts of the spectrum of training are enforced.

Otherwise there will be chaos aka mishaps.

That is why standards run strong on success, they are measured and controllable actions.

You are mandated to be current and to use and seek out the best methods and practices in regard to your boating conduct.

PERFORMANCE ABILITIES

We constantly seek competent people. They may not have the skills initially, but in the selection criteria they have future opportunity.

Operational truth is discovered during the scrutiny of the training attempts, passes and failures. Having desire is not enough, one most understand what a marine unit is and the purposes and rules that back that up.

Its not lifesaving. It’s boating, its seamanship skills, it’s about embracing the precepts of a prudent mariner.

Or it isn’t; and those who aren’t are far too obvious and painful when observed. We want to invite them to change and uplift their chaos into boating safety control.

One of the measures for boating rescue techniques is in the mindset and subsequent performance functions a Coxswains enacts.

How a Coxswain is capable of working under pressure is a great equalizer in maintaining the ‘Seconds and Feet’ performance we have when working in any high-risk zone.

Keep working on your Novel information, ideas, outreach and training.

Set new boating goals, set three at a time and keep refining them.

Check in with your mentors.

Revisit your training doctrines.

Stay in touch with the boating safety organizations and government authorities responsible for boating in your country of origin.

Keep thinking-Keep Learning!

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Posted: February 1, 2020

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Visit page terms and conditions. Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

FASTER THAN THE MASTER

SLOW DOWN

You cannot move faster than the master of boating education. No matter how badly you want it, reality will show you the reasons why.

When you place yourself in that position, you cannot afford the tuition you didn’t pay for by dedication, study and scrutiny. There are no short cuts to rising to the top. Failures can be costly, slow it down a little!

Desire should not be confused with competency. Training is a development structure of the direction one needs to go to attain the necessary skills as an occupational mariner.

Training itself for one evolution in training will not secure mastered success. Life teaches us this lesson all the time. Athletes exemplify it and schools represent it.

Don’t think you can jump ahead without a conscientious respect for boating safety. To be part of community is to be immersed within it and surrounded by other mariners.

To develop your skills, give yourself about six months of applied training. That means every day training, not one training session on the water for 2 hours and 3 hours of preparations.

When somebody tells me, they have been operating Rescue Water Craft for 5 years I take stock of that quote and ponder the agreeableness on its terms.

5 years is 1,825 days. There are 24 hours in a day, if we take 40 hours as a regular work week, we are looking at 2,080 hours a year x 5 that would put them up to about 6,240 hours of Rescue Water Craft on water work. Nobody in the world has it.

Think about restructuring that answer. Stop saying you have 5 years of experience, and start saying you are still learning and get back on the boat!

Learning skills will be restrained or resolved depending upon the relationship value of the particulars that are presented to you and how those sills are corrected. Who doesn’t want to be better at these operations? I sure do!

EARN YOUR MERITS DON'T CLAIM THEM

First you need to make a commitment. This commitment needs to cover several areas, your time, your money and your honest effort and willingness to make improvements. That’s asking a lot of you!

That means you have to be trainable.

Some people simply are not, they need to be realistic and conduct some homework first on the demands associated with Rescue Water Craft operations.

If you aren’t ready to do that part, that educational sacrifice you will never master Coxswain skills needed in the dynamics of boating safety.

You will need professional help. Directly from experts who are properly vetted and tested by a boating organization. If you want the right help you need to go to the best instructor.

Be willing to take honest feedback aka critiques from your instructor. If you cannot take the advice, you probably are not the best fit for this demanding role.

Evaluations can be uncomfortable, but a mishap you create from not listening or not being able to grasp the advice will cost you more than you can afford in reputation.

Once you get your foundational skills down, practice on them one at a time.

• Over and Over.
• Set goals
• Evaluate your benchmarks.
• Move onto the next one.

While you are engaged in your skill building you are still in the experimental phase. Learning the ropes as they say. Do you know where that idiom originally came from? Our nautical heritage of course! The tall ships rigged with ropes to set the sails.

CONSIDER THE OBVERSE

Without the seaman’s knowledge of these ropes these ships could not catch wind to their sails. Hence ‘learn the ropes’ was for the knowledge of the basics of sailing and as the ropes were learned onto the mastery of the ships rigging, raise the main and an assortment of knots as a deckhand.

An instructor will ‘show you the ropes’, because they have the experience to introduce you to the same thing! How does this work? Well, from imitation of course, but within the audience.

We have people who imitate poorly by not making that commitment for training. Without training, there is no knowledge and without knowledge there is no performance. Everything is reliant on the variation of the other. If not, it’s impractical.

In our method of training we know that learning the ropes means you will need to show him the ropes. You cannot master that which you can not define. This takes time, real hours, on-water hours, documented results.

That’s the hard part, people are spread thin on demands and it is challenging to respect the mastery of our seamanship skills. It’s not for everyone.
Don’t learn on your own, get advice, structure and feedback.

Don’t think you can do this after one class, a few days or hours, that’s a formula for failure.

Do learn by passing and failing your skills aka trial and error. Monitor your results.

Seek knowledge from a variety of resources and continue to learn, don’t set an end point on your knowledge. Learn how to use your time in a context of value by focusing on key items you can include in your evolutionary learning objectives.

Be your own Devil’s Advocate. Why are you doing it that way, what else can you do, how will additional dynamics cause your methods to fail, what can you adapt regarding change?

Talk to people you don’t like and to people you admire. Gain insights from both of their respective models. Speak up, don’t hide in the shadows, reach out and tolerate the results.

You cannot move faster than your master. You may have to swallow some humble pie and realize they may still be on the pursuit of study as a learner and that may very well be why they are a master.

When you pair up with a vetted master you now have the opportunity to challenge the evidence and to scale your ambition safely and surely.
You don’t want to end up a master of disaster.

Reconcile that time by becoming a prudent mariner.

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Posted: February 1, 2020

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Visit page terms and conditions. Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

DO NOT TAKE SAFETY AT SEA FOR GRANTED

YOU ARE YOUR RESPONSIBILITY

“A Moment for Safety Will Save a Lifetime of Regret” – Wake of Fame Inductee Brian Bendix

The only reason you are reading this is because you care.

1. If you are a passenger on a Personal Water Craft (PWC) you assume your own risk of safety. Prepare, study and take responsibility for your actions underway and prior to departure.

2. If you are an operator or owner of a Personal Water Craft (PWC) you assume your own risk and safety and those you bring on board. Prepare, study and take responsibility for your actions underway and prior to departure.

Boating is a lot of fun! The pursuit of this experience bears the responsibility of being safe so you can enjoy the outing and come home safe.

There is an amazing amount of content on the internet warning people, free information, free boating courses, free downloads for Owner’s Manuals, forums and groups you can join.

Paid or free you have every opportunity to empower your experience and that of others! Make sure you invest in your personal safety and that of all you have on board your PWC.

You cannot blame the boat, the weather, the water, or your friends. Your safety begins with you!

FREE EBOOK!

If you like what you have read so far, download the FREE eBook!
Accept the terms and conditions and evaluate the content and begin your educational outreach and personal responsibility campaign!

_____________________________________

Book ID: #2-121-20
About this K38 eBook
15 Pages
Published January 21, 2020
Completed: January 20, 2020

Author: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost PWC authority and leading Subject Matter Expert and Founder of K38. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft coxswains. K38 is dedicated towards protecting reputation, distributing boating & water safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care and seamanship skills.
Caution Disclaimer:
Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, gear and OEM manufacturer warning labels, uses and cautions. Read our page disclaimers and terms and agree to them.
Abide by all the Federal, State and Local boating rules and regulations, take a safe boating course.
The content posted on this site is not a training aid and should not be used as such.

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K38-Kanalu K38 2020 Copyright©

RWC Readiness Dimension

The structure of maritime authority and governing boating and water safety rules is based on ‘safety at sea’ measures and a hierarchy of order within a risky and dangerous activity.

This is derived from an organized system of practices based off the evidence from around the world of what people did wrong, how programs failed and what those results were and the faith to make it better.

The role of instructors it to make this world wide learning experience not only safer, but to enforce the safety practices and invest in the student cadre these resolutions.

Its based on a set of skills, the integration of the manner of these practices, the mindset determination of the individual and the boating safety culture.

Training programs are broken into functional categories, and those categories are identifiable domains that reflect the carriage of the student embodiment.

The capacity to fulfill the best practices or standards that you study under also incorporate the study of who you are as an individual. The mindset of a person is the greatest domain. Its based off their complexity of experience and behavioral training and functions in the real world.

These routines are dependent on the pattern of the complexity that involves boating safety.

The maritime possibilities of risk have to be directed at individual solutions with the perceived path while underway. That is a constantly changing dynamic.

If you think you are on the edge of a moving precipice and the boundary is just off your bow, your role is to stay steady and reduce any potential mishaps.

Each time you cross over that next wave (boundary) your performance of that pattern is the realization of your performance value. Was it safe? How do you determine what safe is?

THIS IS YOUR FUTURE

Encourage yourself to look at your operations from an objective perspective. The things you have not experienced yet are not your known module, you have to transfer into the unknown potential to understand the stakes you are engaged with.

The direct encounters you have with each wave, swell, directional change, current vectors of wind force and survivors are complex causalities you must solve on those boundaries.

You find the meaning of safety at sea by the cultural context of the law, the standards, the examples and prior mishaps, possibly even your own.

When you interact with your Rescue Water Craft, TAD and Crew you begin to gain sense of those realities that are not contained within your text book manual. You have to collapse the potential of the unknown into reasonable and transferable actions.

Do not give excuses to the actions you examine. Specify what you experienced if you want to attain operational security from your past to move forward your capable response. The unknown is the manner you use with your specified education history. Use this review process to transform yourself, rather than hold yourself hostage from pathological defense.

The analysis of the objective problem is the key. Your Rescue Water Craft is your model of success, it delivers you to the point of contact desired. This vessel represents your success. However, if it suffers a failure operationally, it becomes a possible threat.

How good are your inspection methods? Do you know how to fix it, to troubleshoot and to afford the budget for repairs?

The Rescue Water Craft is only good when its functional, otherwise it’s a significant liability and a danger to the risk metrics engaged. Geographic and weather compliments will add to this challenge along with the survivor

We are territorial beings, in our regions we become protective. In our failures we become defensive. This does not serve the greater good of our maritime culture.

That territory is challenged by what you do not know, it creates a delusion of where people think they are versus what nature will prove to them in reality.

BOUNDARY OF POTENTIAL

You are only as good as you know what to do. If you do not know how to match your behaviors and place them into motion, you will not aim for the success metric of Rescue Water Craft operational security.

You need to know how to act in your territory of domain aka Rescue Water Craft operations. When operators drive outside of their known RWC territory, they begin to lose control of their situation because they have not mastered that next domain. The possibility of the unknown can have disastrous results.

They can also allow an Operator to awaken to the moment and transcend the unexpected if they maintain a safety mindset.

Being prepared means to not rest in the past, but seek the future solutions.

You can make a dangerous situation worse. Tragedy is what we strive to avoid creating.

You are reaching from familiar territory to the unexplored territory. People do not like change. They know how to behave where they recognize the actions are predictable.

The risk areas in training are to prepare Coxswains for those areas that are unknown and unpredictable.

We are engaged with the chaotic and unpleasant measures of how we can die in an aquatic environment. When we use our training structure, we have to manage our mindset with reasonable balance.

Every time you train you are familiarizing yourself with the new behaviors, and this takes time. You have to associate new actions.

You are working with the danger imposed to make sense from it though your own behaviors. There are multiple pathways of learning, narrow your analysis to attend to necessary results.

Be careful about the abstract ideas of unchallenged methods, do not be distracted from the realities of risk in the maritime environment.

In training you compare results. Pay close attention.

That is the structure a good instructor will deliver and nature will defend. It is your role to make sense of it.

Download this post here:


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Posted: January 21, 2020

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards:
Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost PWC authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft coxswains. K38 is dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

History of the WNY PWC Challenge Coins

THE HISTORY

Craig R. Witt is the founding member of the WNY PWC club based in the Buffalo, New York area.

Back in 2017, the first recreational WNY PWC (Personal Watercraft) event began gaining traction within the PWC community.

This was due to the work that was generated from previous years local events.

These community events gained industry support through the motto ‘We Support Those Who Support Us’.

#WeSupportThoseWhoSupportUs

One of the outstanding supporters was Ken KGees. He had reached out from a military based PWC club, looking to support these efforts. He secured a monetary donation that was gifted to WNY PWC.

TEAMWORK

WNY PWC was inspired by this generosity and decided to “pay it back” through activities that honored a military tradition of mutable respect.

Enter Craig R. Witt. ‘As former veteran myself, I had a challenge coin in my night stand and began searching how to have these made for our PWC events’.

Ken Gees agreed with the concept and together they began working on the original design.

Each year WNY PWC carries on this tradition by having an amazing sponsor cover the cost of this highly collectible challenge coin, These WNY PWC challenge coins show the event ride logo on one side and the donating sponsors logo on the opposite side!

These challenge coins are a club and rider tradition that is carried on each year

STAY TUNED

We can’t wait to see how many coins their members will collect moving forward this outstanding tradition. They have structured some fun opportunities for their members who present their challenge coins at future events.

Stay tuned for those stories…….

For more information please visit: Follow the Club on their Facebook page

Special thanks to Craig for sharing the club information and KGees for his dedication.

To sign up for the free K38 e-book History of Challenge Coins and Memorabilia - Book One, you will find this story in the book: Sign up for FREE e-book!
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Posted: January 20, 2020

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

WHAT YOU DO NOT KNOW IS THE PLACE TO START

WHAT IS THE DUNNING - KRUEGER EFFECT?

“People tend to hold overly favorable views of their abilities in many social and intellectual domains. The authors suggest that this overestimation occurs, in part, because people who are unskilled in these domains suffer a dual burden:

Not only do these people reach erroneous conclusions and make unfortunate choices, but their incompetence robs them of the metacognitive ability to realize it.

Across 4 studies, the authors found that participants scoring in the bottom quartile on tests of humor, grammar, and logic grossly overestimated their test performance and ability. Although their test scores put them in the 12th percentile, they estimated themselves to be in the 62nd.

Several analyses linked this miscalibration to deficits in metacognitive skill, or the capacity to distinguish accuracy from error. Paradoxically, improving the skills of participants, and thus increasing their metacognitive competence, helped them recognize the limitations of their abilities.”
– Dunning/Krueger

Source: Semantics Scholar

FALLING AND FAILING IN THE RESCUE WATER CRAFT CULTURE

You can see them in videos and all over the internet, making claims that you know are reckless, dangerous and negligent, but they are oblivious to. You see it in organizations, associations, departments, teams and instructors.

How can obvious warning signs that are unsafe practices be so easily ignored or unrecognized? This behavior lies in the individual’s self-assessment of over inflated value. This can lead to poor estimation of actual capabilities and lure an Operator into a false sense of security.

This is where we view frequent accidents on videos of Operators using a PWC beyond their actual capabilities. The relevant skills are missing. These detrimental behaviors are costly and only serve a self serving bias and do not reflect our professional operations.

We never arrive at the pinnacle of our objective. We are constantly striving for the horizon of knowledge. This is a mighty journey, do not over place yourself.

When asked do I consider myself an advanced RWC Coxswain, I respond ‘yes, but I have so much more to learn’.

Our enthusiasm for using a Rescue Water Craft and diminishing the boating safety requirements for competency has become a maritime cultural whitewash. It has brought all of us to this monolith at some point in our career.

Usually the wake-up call is a fatality in training or destruction in the field during a call-out. This is where lessons will be learned rather than taught to prevent.

People who are not able to recognize their RWC operational incompetency if tested could not fulfill the reciprocal RWC skills necessary to become competent.

Their logic of performance is based upon the very flaws lacking in their scope even though they boast confidence based on ‘feelings’ rather than ‘facts’, they are a time bomb ticking.

SIGN HERE PLEASE

Why does this matter? Because safety is not a word it is a behavior in place for providing consistent boating operations. We have many predecessors in our ancestral maritime culture who have given us the path towards success. It should not be ignored by the new generation of RWC operators.

The fix for this would be to challenge an Operator as a Coxswain, because the standards are askew between the two.

Stiff regulations of evolutionary boating knowledge are determined by a Coxswain. An Operator is basically anyone at the helm of a Personal Watercraft.

How to avoid the pitfalls of your own meta cognition regarding Rescue Water Craft competency? You have to be critical of yourself; actions, motives, skills and knowledge base.

This is why the scrutineers of instructors must be thoroughly tested based on the science of evidence, fact and performance.

In our boating safety culture, Instructors are the first round of success or failure. If they are not competent in their own scrutiny of the knowledge base, they will turn out the next generation of lower than average Coxswains and Crew members.

However, If an Instructor has been examined after intensive Coxswain training and has the ability to consistently apply themselves to learning and knowledge annually with their recertification, they will be avoiding what is called the Dunning-Kruger effect.

Instructors are not immune to self-inflation. This is why we should all question the content and challenge it for professional development. That type of scrutiny is valid for our safety and those we serve.

KNOWLEDGE IS A PROCESS FOR THE IGNORANT

When a person first engages in learning the RWC knowledge foundation, they previously did not harness now becomes inspiration.

Their prior ignorance of the subject of Rescue Water Craft operations and subsequent instruction afterward, they may feel the invigoration of knowledge.

This is a wonderful experience of inspired purpose, but you are just beginning, it’s the baseline of promise. It is not the destination.

This ignorance can be dangerous if they believe they are an immediate expert.

That takes years of cognitive reasoning with practical applications in the scope of the domain regarding these small power craft. It cannot happen with one class, or one year or even five years.

To master the knowledge base is an intensive process and progress laden struggle, and you should not do this alone. Ask for help. Ask for evaluations, research and study. (Keep repeating that)

Group misconceptions are also on the rise mainly due to the rapid post firing of internet posts that are not scrutinized by governing bodies of education or expertise.

Taking an RWC course does not make you an expert after a few hours or days. Keep training, get on the boat on the water and develop the skills your instructor warned you about.

TO BE OR NOT TO BE

Behavioral training is a significant influencer on our skills, and this can go in an upward or downward trend. Poor imitation is not success.

Knowing something does not make you an expert. Understanding the realities, history and physics behind it with real world data and scrutiny does.

You can be the nicest person on a Personal Watercraft, and well-liked by your friends and colleagues.

But-If you cannot conduct a positive pivot point secure stop on a Rescue Water Craft 50 times, you don’t know what you are doing. And both port and starboard side swings please! After that we will move onto 25 other skill assessments to determine your competency.

This absence of operational knowledge can ruin reputations, damage equipment and injure or kill people.

Isn’t that enough to scare you into a self-evaluation process of your skills? Probably not.

If you are humble and willing to professionally develop your skills, begin here: Focus on your analytic skills. Look at past historic accidents and videos with repetitive operators creating mishaps. Have you missed something? Do you see yourself in the video?

The ethernet universe is cursed with misinformation regarding Rescue Water Craft operations. It is impossible to correct the dangerous operators and educate their adoring fans.

First red flag: Do not seek negative attention from an accident (mishap).

CONSIDER THE OBVERSE

If a Subject Matter Expert who is internationally recognized points out the flaws of safety or operation, listen to them.

Challenge the advice. Be open to the support you are receiving.

You may even help them. Ask me how I know? I had to admit my own shortcomings in knowledge when I stacked up against seasoned boat Captains and Coxswains in the early 1990’s. I quickly realized how little I know about power boating from a technical maritime advantage. I soon wised up and altered course.

‘Criticism in the scope of learning and is the gateway to progress’. (A good affirmation I use)

This is how we construct our positives from our negatives; where failure can endure the process of capacity unfulfilled or neglected.

Be your own Devil’s Advocate. Be hard on yourself, because you care about your reputation.

Write down the opposing views of the positive ones you embrace. What could go wrong? Why would that take place? What sets the pattern in motion for an accident? Do you know what a mishap is and what to consider?

If you changed one thing in your RWC pattern of operations, how much more effective do you think you would be? Are you open to change? Do you have courage to make improvements?

You won’t know until you go.

Reference the Authors: Unskilled and unaware of it: how difficulties in recognizing one's own incompetence lead to inflated self-assessments.

By Justin Kruger and David Dunning (Authors)

Source: Download the Study Here

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Posted: January 19, 2020

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

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Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

THE LANGUAGE OF YOU

Your body language is your connection to those who can see and are willing to listen

You want to get the attention of others? Watch your body language!

When we work in the water you can forget the pitch of sound for articulate conversation. You can demand your body language to compensate and overhaul communication and direction.

When the search is on, our survivors may have their ears covered in water or they may only hear muffled sounds. Their level of conscious being may be diminished.

Are you ready for some constructive advice?

Are you asking that compromised person to ‘put their hand in the air’? Don’t be a poor imitator or at least do not give permission to mislead your potential. You deserve to know the difference.

Start thinking about what you are doing and the results, don’t just assume its proper or the best method. You may discover a disappointment in your past assessments. And that is a good place to start!

What you can expect if you were trained behaviorally in that worn out catch phrase is to assist your survivor in starting their own drowning process if they are using their arms to stay afloat. Don’t listen to people who tell you that because it’s a corrupt behavior.

You must do all the work for our survivors, 100% of the action, it is not a shared 50/50 split! Behavior shift of expected effort with a better resolution to maintain your tempo of lifesaving time.

Time stated as the race against drowning.

EXPAND POTENTIAL - DO NOT CRUSH IT

Don’t allow corruption to be an invitation to a person who is trying to survive, lend them hope by your actions, how you behave and what you do next for them in the water is what they need to rely upon.

Give yourself permission to provide humanity with your best measure, not your restrictions. You have the influence of authority and action, use it with compassion, kindness, strength and knowledge.

Study every day, don’t stop gathering knowledge and perspective.

Part of your navigational role is to try your best to get their attention, but not by reckless operations.

When was the last time you went into the water you work wearing a pair of swim trunks or clothing and floated for 45 minutes, alone? Like a survivor.

That is part of the language you will be speaking and we say it like this:

Think like the survivor but act like the boat coxswain.

You captain the delivery of an asset you can both depend upon because you care.

Remember this you tell your story by your actions, ways and deeds. Practice being mindful of your body movements.

Does the Rescue Water Craft appear stable when you move?
Do you place the craft precisely where it needs to be?
Do you make contact with the survivor before your boat or TAD does?

PAY ATTENTION

Remember, what people can see they will respond. Those movements may be simple, tapping your hand against the hull, reaching out to them, touching them, how your face looks.

Think about your facial expressions. What does your face look like to others? You are wearing a helmet, maybe a balaclava, perhaps eye protection, what else? Can they see your eyes, are you yelling?

Film them and study your response and others, practice using your facial expressions as a way to make contact, an impression.

The tone of your voice, simple and direct words. Where do survivors eyes track? What are they focused on? Can they hear you or are they in shock, which words would be symbolic to their soul at that moment?

Our behaviors are a constant work in progress.

That means the love you have for your job, for survivors and yourself are the divine of our purpose.

Do not be afraid, be amazing!

Download this article here:


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Posted: December 6, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.

WHEN YOU DECIDE

When You Want Excellence in Your Operations, You Express Gratitude.

Want some real-life water rescue advice? This is a compassionate question.

To instill excellence in your rescue boat operations you have to give more than the instructor guidance, more than the workbooks and be ready for the water and weather.

This means you need to decide who you are going to be and what you are willing to give.

You need a hunger or a model of inspiration to drive your will towards goals that exemplify ‘excellence’.

That does not mean you take a course and resign yourself to the certificate issued. Many courses hand them out freely without scrutiny that cares about your functionality. Start caring about your performance.

Were you challenged and corrected, measured and critiqued with sincere discernment? Seek out the critics!

You are just beginning to learn- post training, you now have a place to start. You certainly have not arrived!

It’s time to continue taking steps towards navigating your reputation, spirit, beliefs, strengths and fears.

Don’t succumb to the methods of educational or instructive mediocrity or your last class, even mine. Move ahead on a continuum of developing a structured reasoning of water rescue knowledge. Don’t be brand favorited.

Explore fearlessly the things you embrace or ignore. Tell yourself with sincere conviction: I CAN DO THAT

You may allow yourself to be confined and restricted from creative opportunities that hold your potential hostage.

You have to give more. Put in more time. Sacrifice and possibly use additional resources of financial commitment or travel.

GET CONNECTED

Find a trusted mentor. Do they care about your reputation? How does that measure in action and output?

The only life that provides a spiritual and physical balance is one lived with purpose.

Remember this do not seek praise as your justification of excellence. No, refrain from the praise and seek the encouragement of improvement where you are not excelling! Those critical assessments even if they seem harsh to you, if you don’t get it, you are not trainable. You are emotional.

If you are feelings are hurt from an instructor comment, you need to keep practicing till you get it right! Listen to them and don’t waste their time or yours. You must be trainable or you are looking for the wrong results.

If you have selected the field of rescue as a work discipline, whether volunteer or paid staff, you have eclipsed a spiritual calling, it is simply not a job.

It requires of us that strive for excellence a deeper understanding of the fear associated with dire circumstances, the unknown human condition, our courage and bravery and our foremost skills and tools.

We must keep a measure of continued seeking knowledge to maintain that sacred trust.

We are seekers, searchers and problem solvers, we think for two, three or ten. It is not just about us.

WHO IS YOUR MENTOR?

When I teach in my audience, I see the prospective student in front of me. Spiritually I recognize my burden. It is their parents, teammates, agency, children, wife, husband or beloved, their brothers or sisters or those who depend upon them.

It is the manufacturers of the equipment we train with and use, it is their employees, all who laid a hand on the production and we trust their efforts and tools.

There are thousands of people in my classroom. And my ancestors are watching me. Am I a good steward of their trust, faith and determination? Do I wield their failures and warnings and guidance with respect, duty and honor?

How do I determine that? By humility and service, being a servant of the past to move the future.

These students are either there by their own volition or assigned to take my training. They come in blind faith, or with judgement and negative attitudes. How do we move beyond our own prejudices and expectations and arrive at trust?

We earn it by evidence and historical tempering.

We are the most difficult and opportunistic beings alive; we choose every minute how and what we will do.

In training, we cannot be selfish to a fault, we have to encompass all personalities, maturity levels and egos.

That takes trust, genuine influence of your explored and unique soul-and an open mind who is willing to listen.

But the training content must deliver.

I will keep learning. I invite you to join me and thousands of others in the pursuit of excellence as a way of being.

The world needs your competence and abilities. Let’s get busy!

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Posted: December 6, 2019

Content Creator of Rescue Water Craft and Personal Water Craft boating international education standards: Shawn Alladio is the world’s foremost authority and leading subject matter expert. She cares most about her community and the culture surrounding the safety of event service providers and Rescue Water Craft operators, working hard and dedicated towards protecting their reputation, distributing safety information and continuing to train these amazing individuals to the highest standards of care.

__________

Have any questions? Come train with us and discover what your community is doing to modernize standards, safety and reduce liability!

Caution: Use at your own risk. Please take a qualified Rescue Water Craft training course and maintain proper records and respect all the PWC, RWC, PPE, and gear OEM manufacturer warning labels and cautions.